New year miscellany (open thread)

Two minor bits of federal polling news, a change in party representation in the House of Representatives, and looming electoral events in the Northern Territory and Victoria.

‘Tis the season to be silly, but there is at least the following to relate:

• Roy Morgan published an SMS poll a fortnight ago that found 53% would vote yes in a referendum on an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voice to parliament, with 30% for no and 17% for undecided. A yes majority was recorded in five of six states, the exception being Queensland with 44% for yes and 38% for no. The poll was conducted December 9 to 12 from a sample of 1499.

• The Age/Herald reported last Wednesday on a quarterly analysis of Resolve Strategic polling, though since the pollster provides breakdowns for the three largest states with each poll result, this was less illuminating than the similar exercise performed for Newspoll. However, it did provide results for Western Australia, showing Labor up a point from its strong performance at the election to 38% and the Coalition down a further five to 30%.

• Calare MP Andrew Gee has quit the Nationals to sit as an independent over the party leadership’s opposition to an indigenous voice to parliament. This reduces the Coalition to 57 seats in the House of Representatives and increases the cross bench from 16 to 17, with Labor still on 77.

• A by-election looms for the Northern Territory seat of Arafura, which covers the Tiwi Islands along with mainland territory around West Arnhem, following the death last month of Lawrence Costa, the Labor member since 2016. A defeat would not imperil Natasha Fyles’ government, with Labor holding 14 out of the Legislative Assembly’s 25 seats, not including Blain MP Mark Turner who was expelled from caucus in February 2021.

• The Narracan supplementary election will be held on January 28, finally bringing resolution to the Victorian state election. The election for the seat was not conducted on November 26 after Nationals candidate Shaun Gilchrist died in the period between the close of nominations and election day.

• The Victorian Election Commission has announced it will conduct full preference counts through to the final counts in February, having previously only conducted the counts to the point needed to determine the winning candidate.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

4,056 comments on “New year miscellany (open thread)”

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  1. Australia’s fertility rate rebounded to pre-pandemic levels in 2020-21, according to a snapshot from the federal government’s latest population statement.

    In 2020-21, the fertility rate was 1.66 babies per woman, similar to the rate recorded in 2018-19. In 2019-20, the rate had fallen to 1.61 babies per woman.

    According to the report, the data suggests people “adapted to the uncertainty of the pandemic and quickly caught-up on delayed childbearing plans”.

    The temporary decline in births was most evident in the December 2020 quarter, when births fell by 3,000 to reach 71,000 births, the lowest quarterly result in 15 years, the report says.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2023/jan/02/australias-fertility-rate-rebounds-to-pre-covid-levels-but-jim-chalmers-issues-warning-on-ageing-population

  2. I hope Elon Musk ends up losing Twitter. He has built up so much bad karma since he bought it that he should. I mean, allowing that misogynist Andrew Tate back on Twitter! Genius move?

  3. Best wishes for the New Year to William and the PB community. Always plenty to aspire to and achieve. Strong progress on climate change, Voice, biodiversity conservation and general health and well being will be a good start.

  4. Two years after the UK transitioned out of the European Union nearly two-thirds of Britons now support a referendum on rejoining. A Savanta survey for The Independent also shows that the number of people who oppose another vote has fallen, with less than a quarter of voters now against a referendum.

    The UK formally left the EU on 31 January 2020, but the “transition period” meant it observed Brussels laws and remained in the single market until 31 December 2020. Since then Britons believe the economy, the UK’s global influence and the ability to control our own borders have all got worse, the survey also shows. This appears to have contributed to a boost in the numbers who want a future referendum on membership.

    The number who say there should be another vote is now 65 per cent, up from 55 per cent at the same point last year, although they are split over the timing. The most popular options were now, at 22 per cent, and within the next 5 years, 24 per cent, followed by within 6-10 years, 11 per cent. Just 4 per cent thought another vote should be in more than 20 years, while those who said there should never be a second referendum have fallen from 32 to 24 per cent.

  5. I imagine the EU would never allow the UK back in….and I think it would need to be a unanimous vote to let them back in. Also new members get a different deal than the older members, so the UK will be getting a worse hand than when they left!

    The UK trash talked and undermined the EU for so long, leave it as an example to other members of the consequences of leaving.

  6. Morning all. I enjoyed the reasoned discussion of Ukraine v Russia last night. One of the players – Turkey – has an election due soon. Erdogan is increasingly autocratic and has profited from defecting from western sanctions on Russia.

    This Guardian article looks at conflict risks around the world, including via Turkey/Iran / mid east, (China) Taiwan and North Korea.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/jan/01/ukraine-taiwan-north-korea-iran-palestine-flashpoints-2023

    Reading this, and thinking about the reality of the Ukraine conflict from last night, several conclusions seem apparent to me.
    1. There is no case for Iraq style Australian army involvement in them. We would only inflame things and make matters worse. No more deputy sheriff please!
    2. It follows from that that our army should be designed to defend Australia and assist regional neighbors, nothing more. So lets forget costly US tanks and AFVs. We should send the ones we have to Ukraine.
    3. We should keep focusing on better regional alliances, similar to the QUAD.
    4. We should focus our navy and air force on defending our region and patrolling shipping lanes to Australia. So subs, ships, F35s and missiles yes, B21s no.
    5. RAN ships (or SSNs) in the Taiwan Straight is folly. We will make no difference to the outcome, and get caught in a dangerous war. We can still support Taiwan with supplies, as the west does for Ukraine.
    6. AUKUS tying us closely to USA without any treaty benefit is not a good thing. What if Biden loses to De Santis in two years? Building French SSNs is more stable.

  7. HoldenHillbilly, Torchbearer

    Brexit was only ever a swindle, sold on a pack of lies about EU funding, that was designed to get London city financial dealers out from EU financial regulations. There was only pain for the rest of the UK economy.

    In this light it seems obvious that UK involvement in AUKUS was a marketing exercise only. UK has no intention of any permanent defense commitment to Asia. They just wanted to win a sub contract off the French. Even the offer of Astute class SSNs was a bait and switch, as Ben Wallace has since confirmed it is going out of production. They want us to pay for development of their next SSN.

  8. The Eurolanders have had enough of the whingers and whiners from across the North Sea.
    They would be crazy to accept the UK back into Euroland – even with a 100% Yes vote, from 100% of eligible UK voters.
    It is not going to happen,again.

  9. Thanks William. Based on the online comments accompanying Anne Twomey’s opinion piece on the Voice in the 9fax outlets, I don’t think there’s much hope of a civilised, respectful referendum campaign. Probably naive to imagine that was ever a possibility. The anti Voice commentary, of which there’s quite a bit, has all the hallmarks of an organised misinformation exercise.

    That’s not how the published polling looks at the moment. It might just be, as with the cookers at the Vic election, that some Voice opponents are making a heap of noise but will turn out to be electorally irrelevant on the day.

  10. Britain seems desperate and doesn’t know what to do basically….. The Johnson bravado bought then a few years of denial…. Bit now an ugly reality has arrived

  11. Of course the EU would welcome Britain back into the EU. No brainer. Business is business. The UK in the EU is good for everyone.

  12. Socrates

    Agreed re the Guardian broad brush article, a fair summary. Due to our own parlous position with respect to Defence acquisition, Australia needs to focus on this issue and our own region for the next decade.

  13. Max

    “ The anti Voice commentary, of which there’s quite a bit, has all the hallmarks of an organised misinformation exercise.”

    The LNP under Dutton has hardly landed a glove on the Albanese government so far. Even if they don’t care either way about the Voice, defeating it might be seen as a victory that would damage their enemy. So sacrificing Aboriginal welfare is a means to an end. Plus ex Qld cop Dutton might genuinely oppose more rights for first nations people.

    This would explain the usual Liberal media noise machine getting involved. It is the first target they think they can harm in the new era.

    The tactic of “seeking the details” is a lot like the anti-climate change tactics. They don’t want to say they oppose more rights for Aboriginals, so they ask for more detail, hoping to find something they can attack, while never supporting any particular model.

  14. ‘Socrates says:
    Monday, January 2, 2023 at 7:31 am

    Morning all. I enjoyed the reasoned discussion of Ukraine v Russia last night. One of the players – Turkey – has an election due soon. Erdogan is increasingly autocratic and has profited from defecting from western sanctions on Russia.

    This Guardian article looks at conflict risks around the world, including via Turkey/Iran / mid east, (China) Taiwan and North Korea.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/jan/01/ukraine-taiwan-north-korea-iran-palestine-flashpoints-2023

    Reading this, and thinking about the reality of the Ukraine conflict from last night, several conclusions seem apparent to me.
    1. There is no case for Iraq style Australian army involvement in them. We would only inflame things and make matters worse. No more deputy sheriff please!
    2. It follows from that that our army should be designed to defend Australia and assist regional neighbors, nothing more. So lets forget costly US tanks and AFVs. We should send the ones we have to Ukraine.
    ….’
    =============================
    Agree that it was a good discussion.

    We don’t know what the range of war scenarios in our region of security interest is likely to be over the next three to five decades.

    We don’t know what the range of possible voluntary or involuntary engagements that the scenarios might entail for Australia. (There is a hidden assumption in nearly ALL Australian defence thinking that it is Australia which decides when and where it joins its wars. We have been bloody lucky to date. But there is no particular reason that bit of national luck will hold for another half century.)

    One of the signal lessons of Putin’s War is that tanks, AFVs and APCs are not obsolete.

    In relation to restricting our role in the threatened Xi Invasion of Taiwan to only resupply, the overwhelming likelihood is that resupply would be contested. A decision to resupply would more likely than not be a decision to engage.

  15. I note that the usual claque of Bludger China apologists have leapt to the defence of their comrades. Included is the mandatory clutch of ‘Whatabouts’.

    The rational reason to treat China’s inbound travelers differentially is that China’s Government has demonstrated massive bad faith when it comes to sharing information about the Covid situation in China.

    A week ago, for example, we were informed that there had been a single death. We are not getting advice on variants. What we are being fed is outrageous lies.

    ‘The Global Times’ article linked several times in yesterday’s thread is classic China international bullying. If you stuff around with travelers from China you face a ban on Chinese tourists visiting your state.

  16. ‘Max

    “ The anti Voice commentary, of which there’s quite a bit, has all the hallmarks of an organised misinformation exercise.
    ….’
    ====================================
    Bandt and Thorpe are part of an organized misinformation exercise? Yeah. Nah. The Greens are a chaotic mess on the Voice. Thorpe, spokesperson on Indigenous Affairs for the Greens, has yet to resile from the Voice referendum being ‘a waste of money’, for example. As for Bandt, silence on the Voice is golden. For once!

  17. Boerwar

    “ In relation to restricting our role in the threatened Xi Invasion of Taiwan to only resupply, the overwhelming likelihood is that resupply would be contested. A decision to resupply would more likely than not be a decision to engage.”

    That is a risk but not a certainty. The ships and subs I mentioned could all assist in escorting and protecting supply convoys to Taiwan. Buying B21s and Virginia SSNs to lob missiles at Chinese bases is a step well beyond that. They would not protect such a convoy as much as AW destroyers, frigates or other SSN options. B21s and Virginias are essentially offensive, not defensive assets.

    I think we need to be prepared for conflict, but we should not seek it. I suspect some in defense and the defense industry hope for conflict.


  18. Holdenhillbillysays:
    Monday, January 2, 2023 at 7:12 am
    Two years after the UK transitioned out of the European Union nearly two-thirds of Britons now support a referendum on rejoining. A Savanta survey for The Independent also shows that the number of people who oppose another vote has fallen, with less than a quarter of voters now against a referendum.

    The UK formally left the EU on 31 January 2020, but the “transition period” meant it observed Brussels laws and remained in the single market until 31 December 2020. Since then Britons believe the economy, the UK’s global influence and the ability to control our own borders have all got worse, the survey also shows. This appears to have contributed to a boost in the numbers who want a future referendum on membership.

    The number who say there should be another vote is now 65 per cent, up from 55 per cent at the same point last year, although they are split over the timing. The most popular options were now, at 22 per cent, and within the next 5 years, 24 per cent, followed by within 6-10 years, 11 per cent. Just 4 per cent thought another vote should be in more than 20 years, while those who said there should never be a second referendum have fallen from 32 to 24 per cent.

    Buyers remorse!
    EU may say “fat chance” if UK wants to join EU after the trouble Britain gave them while they were member.

    It is not the marriage of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton, where they kept divorcing and remarrying. 🙂


  19. Socratessays:
    Monday, January 2, 2023 at 7:51 am
    HoldenHillbilly, Torchbearer

    Brexit was only ever a swindle, sold on a pack of lies about EU funding, that was designed to get London city financial dealers out from EU financial regulations. There was only pain for the rest of the UK economy.

    In this light it seems obvious that UK involvement in AUKUS was a marketing exercise only. UK has no intention of any permanent defense commitment to Asia. They just wanted to win a sub contract off the French. Even the offer of Astute class SSNs was a bait and switch, as Ben Wallace has since confirmed it is going out of production. They want us to pay for development of their next SSN.

    AUKUS was/is a fraud perpetrated on Australian people from the beginning. Shame on Richard Marles for continuing it with the consent of Albanese. No ifs, no buts and no other anatomical parts.

  20. Re Socrates @8:03

    The tactic of “seeking the details” is a lot like the anti-climate change tactics. They don’t want to say they oppose more rights for Aboriginals, so they ask for more detail, hoping to find something they can attack, while never supporting any particular model.

    That is part of the motivation, but I think that it’s mainly about preparing the ground for scare campaigns, creating a space in which they can plant seeds of fear and doubt.

  21. Good Morning Dawn Patrollers!

    I think I’ll start today off with this hilarious Andrew Dyson cartoon 😀

    Now on to the news of the day.

    I’ll start with a cricket and politics story. The PM had the Aus cricket team to Kirribilli House on Sunday and announced he will be going to India to see the cricket and meet Narendra Modi

    https://www.smh.com.au/sport/cricket/albanese-tries-to-corner-warner-into-becoming-a-rabbitohs-fan-20230101-p5c9qp.html

    Now to a very Summer story. Cicadas. What are cicadas, and why do they make such a racket? Why does it happen at dusk? And why only in summer?

    https://www.smh.com.au/environment/conservation/as-loud-as-a-jet-taking-off-why-do-cicadas-sing-at-dusk-20211101-p594xe.html

    Shane Wright has another 2002 Howard government Cabinet Papers story. This time concerning whether to use excess IVF embryos for research.

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/the-sneaky-language-that-failed-to-stop-medical-research-with-embryos-20221227-p5c8ww.html

    Lula! has been sworn in to the Presidency of Brazil.

    https://www.smh.com.au/world/south-america/lula-set-for-inauguration-as-bolsonaro-supporters-say-they-re-ready-for-war-against-communism-20230101-p5c9qm.html

    How the US House Speaker’s election could devolve into chaos. Here’s what you need to know about the election.

    https://www.smh.com.au/world/north-america/how-the-us-house-speaker-s-election-could-devolve-into-chaos-20230102-p5c9s7.html

    The Australian fertility rate has bounced back to pre pandemic levels. What else do you do when you’re stuck at home during lockdown? 😉

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/fertility-rate-bounces-back-to-pre-pandemic-levels-20230101-p5c9pk.html

    Climate change a harsh reality for emergency minister, Murray Watt, after year of record floods.

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/climate-change-a-harsh-reality-for-emergency-minister-after-year-of-record-floods-20221223-p5c8kz.html

    Mike Foley does an analysis of how Labor’s energy market intervention carries a series of political risks.

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/labor-s-energy-market-intervention-carries-a-series-of-political-risks-20221226-p5c8ud.html

    Liberals ask for ‘serious detail’ on Voice after timeline for referendum set. Constitutional law professor Anne Twomey said it was sensible to leave detail until later.

    https://www.smh.com.au/national/liberals-ask-for-serious-detail-on-voice-after-timeline-for-referendum-set-20230101-p5c9pp.html

    And Anne Twomey has an article outlining her views about the Voice.

    https://www.smh.com.au/national/parliament-not-the-devil-should-control-the-detail-on-the-voice-20230101-p5c9pe.html

    Anita Pointer of the Grammy-winning Pointer Sisters dies at 74. Vale Anita, the Pointer Sisters made some iconic music.

    https://www.smh.com.au/world/north-america/anita-pointer-of-the-grammy-winning-pointer-sisters-dies-at-74-20230101-p5c9qy.html

    Xi Jinping suggests dissent is OK, while internet videos are removed from Weibo 🙄

    https://www.smh.com.au/world/asia/xi-jinping-suggests-dissent-is-ok-while-internet-videos-are-removed-from-weibo-20230101-p5c9o6.html

    In a televised speech to mark the New Year, Xi said China had overcome unprecedented difficulties and challenges in the battle against Covid, and that its policies were “optimised” when the situation and time so required.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/dec/31/china-xi-jinping-new-year-address

    Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus says WHO officials stressed to Beijing the importance of sharing data ahead of easing of travel restrictions on 8 January

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/dec/31/who-urges-covid-data-transparency-as-china-prepares-to-open-borders

    Xi Jinping’s reputation in China and his standing in the world may not survive this Covid disaster. Having forced draconian lockdowns on his people, China’s supreme leader is now expecting them to believe that the virus is no worse than a cold.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/jan/01/xi-jinpings-reputation-in-china-and-his-standing-in-the-world-may-not-survive-this-covid-disaster

    Australia imposes mandatory Covid tests for travellers from China amid fears of diplomatic backlash

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2023/jan/01/australia-imposes-mandatory-covid-tests-for-travellers-from-china-amid-fears-of-diplomatic-backlash

    Grog on the year in Australian economics: inflation roars, interest rates bite and real wages fall off a cliff.

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/grogonomics/2022/dec/22/the-year-in-australian-economics-inflation-roars-interest-rates-bite-and-real-wages-fall-off-a-cliff

    Van Badham looks back on 2022

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/dec/27/courage-sums-up-the-spirit-of-2022-to-honour-the-heroes-among-us-we-must-be-brave-too

    Peter Lewis asks if we can take this calmer mindset into 2023, where we will be invited to embark on a journey to anchor our nation to this ancient land.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/commentisfree/2022/dec/13/as-2022-comes-to-a-close-australians-can-enjoy-a-reprieve-from-the-algorithms-of-fear-and-outrage

    From the Editor’s desk, Lenore Taylor says that as it marks the end of its first decade, Guardian Australia will scrutinise climate policies, cost-of-living measures and contribute to the Indigenous voice debate.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2022/dec/23/australians-reset-their-priorities-in-2022-but-in-2023-we-must-hold-our-leaders-accountable

    Demographer Simon Kuestenmacher has some praise for a few of our politicians.

    https://www.theguardian.com/au/commentisfree

    The Treasurer, Jim Chalmers, has issued a warning on our ageing population.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2023/jan/02/australias-fertility-rate-rebounds-to-pre-covid-levels-but-jim-chalmers-issues-warning-on-ageing-population

    Simon Tisdall does a roundup and speculates that Taiwan, North Korea, Iran and Palestine are all potential flashpoints that could distract western attention from the invasion in 2023.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/jan/01/ukraine-taiwan-north-korea-iran-palestine-flashpoints-2023

    Where did the new year’s resolution come from? Well, we’ve been making them for 4,000 years.

    https://theconversation.com/where-did-the-new-years-resolution-come-from-well-weve-been-making-them-for-4-000-years-196661

    It seems as though Matthew Franklin has left Anthony Albanese’s employ and become a journalist again for The New Daily. Here he says that the honeymoon is over for the PM.

    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/politics/australian-politics/2023/01/01/anthony-albanese-2023/

    And here are some cartoons from around the world today (because they’re as rare as hen’s teeth in Australia)

    From Iran

    Roar Hagen

    Carlos Latuff

    And that’s it!

  22. UK Cartoons:
    Chris Burke on the #newyear #strikes #NewYear2023

    Nicola Jennings: a bumpy start to #2023 #strikes #RishiSunak

    Graeme Keyes on a post Christmas tale

    Ella Baron on #2023NewYear #RishiSunack

    US Cartoons:


  23. ‘Quasar says:
    Monday, January 2, 2023 at 7:44 am

    GoodMorning all.
    I haven’t seen Poroti post for a while? I may have missed him but hope he’s ok.’
    ============================
    Poroti posted only just a few days ago.

  24. Soc
    I take your points on resupply. I suggest that it would probably be sensible to regard a decision to resupply as, de facto, a decision to engage militarily.

  25. Socrates @ Monday, January 2, 2023 at 7:31 am:
    Morning all. I enjoyed the reasoned discussion of Ukraine v Russia last night.
    ============

    Socrates, Boerwar seconded that point, and I third it. FWIW, I think the lack of proper offensive capability granted to Ukraine is the main thing stopping a quick resolution. Russia won’t just stop, because Putin can’t be easily ousted. Russian forces have to be physically ousted.

  26. Thanks C@tmomma for the Dawn Patrol today – including this one which is more of a scare campaign on behalf of the gas lobby than a serious analysis. Woe betide the government for daring to interfere in the gas cartel’s cosy little money spinner!

    Mike Foley does an analysis of how Labor’s energy market intervention carries a series of political risks.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/labor-s-energy-market-intervention-carries-a-series-of-political-risks-20221226-p5c8ud.html

  27. ‘It seems as though Matthew Franklin has left Anthony Albanese’s employ and become a journalist again for The New Daily. Here he says that the honeymoon is over for the PM.

    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/politics/australian-politics/2023/01/01/anthony-albanese-2023/
    ————————————-
    The ‘death of the honeymoon’ is quite a meme among the journo pack, ATM. I assume that we will be getting lots of ‘tests’ for Labor in 2023.

    Back in early December Bandt announced, with some glee, that the Albanese Government’s honeymoon is over. This is shortly after Bandt made a spectacular goose of himself and the Greens over the fossil price cap legislation. When it comes to honeymoons the Greens have never had a good root.

    2023 will be a difficult year for governments all over the world.

    There is every sign that the Albanese Labor Government will continue to engage and continue to make rational decisions. There is every sign that vested interests will continue to squeal.

    IMO the most challenging area for the Albanese Government in 2023 will be the hip pocket nerve.

    Meanwhile, just to remind us of what Remeikis and others have systematically ignored, this is what the Albanese Government in the sphere of women’s equality in 2022:

    1. Labor initiates a national policy discussion on policies to make dating apps more safe.
    2. Eight out of ten senior diplomatic posts filled with female appointees.
    3. First ever ambassador for gender equity appointed.
    4. A woman (Susan Kenny) is appointed as acting president to clean out the AAT.
    5. After eons of granting a large majority of grants to male researchers, the NHMRC is to award grants on a roughly fifty/fifty basis.
    6. 14 women and 9 men in the Victorian Labor Government Cabinet.
    7. Respect in the Workplace legislation.
    8. Gender equity is a core objective of the new IR legislation.
    9. Katy Gallagher: $5m over five years to boost the number of women in public office. The women in public office grant is designed to encourage – and prepare – more women to run for elections at all levels.
    10. Making good on rescuing Australian women and children from hell hole camps.
    11. Vic Labor supports the Diamonds, filling the ethical and financial hole left by a certain commercial interest.
    12. The Government today announced the appointment of Adjunct Professor Debora Picone AO as Chair of the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Review Reference Committee.

    13. National Plan to End Violence against Women and Children 2022–2032
    14. Extension of paid parental leave in the 2022 Budget.
    15. Moves afoot to rescue 20 Australian women and around 40 children from a Turkish internment camp.
    Jayne Jagot appointed to Australia’s High Court, creating first majority-female bench.
    16. Ms Falkingham will be the first permanent female Chief Executive of the NDIA.
    17. Federal Labor has appointed three eminently well qualified women to the Climate Council. This offsets the undue representation of businessmen on the Council.
    18. Federal Indigenous Affairs Minister Burney supports the development of a separate National Strategy to Address Violence Against Indigenous Women. The latter will be heavily involved in the design of the Strategy.
    19. The Victorian government on Sunday announced it would spend $270 million to recruit and train thousands of new nurses and midwives under the scheme.
    20. Labor has more female MPs than male MPs. (The Abbott, Turnbull and Morrison governments were not within a bull’s roar of this achievement.)
    21. Labor is fully committed to implementing all the Jenkins Report recommendations. (The Morrison Government implemented a view recommendations but basically sat on the vast majority of the Report’s recommendations.)
    22. High levels of women in the ministry. (Abbott, Turnbull and Morrison governments had far, far fewer women in the ministry).
    23. Labor gave a direction to the Fair Work Commission to specifically take into account the gender pay gap along with power to make gender specific determinations to close the gap. (The Abbott, Turnbull and Morrison governments had one universal ambitions: to damp down any real wage growth and showed zero interest in closing the gender pay gap.)
    24. Labor intervened directly in the minimum wage decision which disproportionately benefits the lowest paid workers: women. (Abbott, Turnbull and Morrison did not do this.)
    25. In recent departmental secretary appointments: Labor appointed three out of the four women. (Morrison’s last five secretarial appointments in 2019 involved a net loss of three women.)
    26. Labor is setting the tone by promising to make boards, such as the Reserve Bank Board more representative.
    27. Three Labor women ministers to lead aspects of the skills and jobs summit that relate to women’s participation, women upskilling and closing the wages gap.
    28. Labor has avoided school holidays for sitting days.
    29. Labor has instituted humane sitting hours on sitting days.
    30. Morrison Government sat on the Report on the National Stakeholder Consultation for a Ten Year Domestic Violence Plan. Labor has released the Report with expedition.
    31. Labor introduces paid domestic violence leave legislation
    32. Ten days domestic violence leave for casual workers.
    33. Submission to the Fair Work Commission on pay in the Aged Care industry. Four out of five workers in that industry are women.
    34. Moves to legislate on coercive control.Not one of those eleven were in place in the past nine years.
    35. Removes the ban on military and public service staff from engaging in certain “woke” charity, cultural and diversity events, imposed by former minister Peter Dutton last year.

  28. citizen,
    I imagine the gas lobby won’t tire in their efforts to discredit the government. We just have to learn to take their dire predictions with a very large grain of salt.

  29. Socrates says:
    Monday, January 2, 2023 at 8:19 am

    ‘Boerwar

    I think we need to be prepared for conflict, but we should not seek it.
    …’
    ———————————
    Amen, brother.

  30. citizensays:
    Monday, January 2, 2023 at 8:52 am
    Thanks C@tmomma for the Dawn Patrol today – including this one which is more of a scare campaign on behalf of the gas lobby than a serious analysis. Woe betide the government for daring to interfere in the gas cartel’s cosy little money spinner!

    Mike Foley does an analysis of how Labor’s energy market intervention carries a series of political risks.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/labor-s-energy-market-intervention-carries-a-series-of-political-risks-20221226-p5c8ud.html
    _________________________________________
    The risk is that more opportunities to graft and shaft the public will be cut…

  31. Here’s some big news!

    Peter Cronau
    @PeterCronau
    ·
    11h
    Quite a story if verified. ABC’s John Lyons has today reported he expects Julian Assange to be unconditionally released “within two months”.
    Events may prove PM Albanese’s ‘quiet diplomacy’ was the correct pathway to freedom
    Whatever the situation, now is the time for peak press.

  32. Thanks to all the posters here, especially Dr Bowe, BK and Cat. Your contributions are appreciated and highly valued by me and make this excellent site the first place I go to of a morning.

  33. On Britain and the EU.

    The EU would welcome Britain back in an instant, but it would require Britain to embrace the Euro and monetary union as well as open EU borders.

  34. Cat, thanks for the roundup! And Alpha Zero thanks for the cartoons.

    Boerwar 8.54

    Like you I recoil from the “honeymoon” narrative because it implies the polls are a temporary sugar hit. This ignores the reality that the Albanese government already has delivered many of its promises. As your list shows, there is an impressive list of achievements.

    I also think there is a danger in looking ahead too gloomily. In terms of climate change and China it is gloomy. But even there the policy repair work has started.

    Labor will also soon start reaping the benefits of ending Morrison era rorts and waste. The billions saved from killing off dodgy grant funding will be useful when Chalmers first full year budget is handed down. If Chalmers can get the budget back into surplus (possible now) the howls of jealousy will be heard from Menzies House to Murdoch’s office.

  35. ‘Belair says:
    Monday, January 2, 2023 at 9:15 am

    On Britain and the EU.

    The EU would welcome Britain back in an instant, but it would require Britain to embrace the Euro and monetary union as well as open EU borders.’
    ————————————-
    The opening negotiating frames for each side would be interesting! The quickest and cleanest outcome would simply be a return to status quo ante. Anything else might take a decade to sort out.

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