Newspoll: 51-49 to Labor

Malcolm Turnbull’s hitherto surging personal ratings take a turn for the worse, as both sides lose ground on the primary vote and two-party preferred remains as was.

The latest Newspoll, courtesy of The Australian, is the fourth in a row to show Labor leading 51-49 on two-party preferred, from primary votes of Coalition 37% (down two), Labor 35% (down one), Greens 10% (steady) and One Nation 9% (up two). Malcolm Turnbull’s previously surging personal ratings have collapsed – he is down six on approval 36% and up seven on disapproval to 55%, and his lead over Bill Shorten as preferred prime minister has narrowed from 48-29 to 44-32. Bill Shorten is steady on 32% approval, and down one on disapproval to 56%.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

764 comments on “Newspoll: 51-49 to Labor”

  1. DTT
    Some of the problems with cosmetic surgery relate to what we were discussing a few days ago; all doctors get an MB, BS (bachelor of medicine and surgery) and can legally do any operation or see any patient they want. I could legally see a seriously ill psychiatric patient, then go and do brain surgery and finish off the day with a heart transplant (in practice it would be tough as I’d struggle to find a hospital dumb enough to let me do it). Most of what you learn at medical school you don’t need, and frankly patients are much better if you concentrate on about 5% and don’t go near the other 95%.

  2. I assume one gets a MB with a BS just in case you end up on Gilligan’s Island and need to remove someone’s appendix or chop off an infected leg or remove a splinter.

    Shoving silicone into foolish people probably was not the aim of the curriculum.

  3. ” The Husar whatsit tells me that Labor isn’t as far beyond self-cannibalism as you imply.”… If you call the Husar story “self cannibalism”, what do you call the internal situation in the Liberal party?
    Don’t forget that this Newspoll (51% ALP) is post-Husar …. Pre-Husar the 2PP from Newspoll was….. 51% ALP…. Hence, the Husar effect is: ZERO!

  4. If you call the Husar story “self cannibalism”, what do you call the internal situation in the Liberal party?

    I think I call it a protection racket. The Libs have managed, to the best of my knowledge, to avoid having any current MP involuntarily forced out of their seat by factional forces within their own party. They’ve also managed to keep a number of MP’s who have legitimate questions to answer under s44 from having to front up and answer any of them (and probably get kicked out of Parliament).

    They may be far from united, but one thing you don’t see is Liberal people running other Liberal people out of Liberal-held seats. Labor might benefit politically from attaining at least that most basic level of discipline.

  5. Puffy
    There is no way someone just out of med school could safely remove an appendix or amputate a leg. They don’t teach those things in med school.

  6. Your point is valid a r, a bit of solidarity goes a long way, but the first thing I thought of was Turnbull blasting King out of Wentworth.

    Anyway, there should be competition for positions, but it should be by the rules. You also need robust and honest inforcement of the rules to make sure the proceedure for making complaints is followed.

    The Husar stuff was a gift to the bad guys.

  7. Diogenes @ #750 Monday, August 13th, 2018 – 11:09 pm

    DTT
    Some of the problems with cosmetic surgery relate to what we were discussing a few days ago; all doctors get an MB, BS (bachelor of medicine and surgery) and can legally do any operation or see any patient they want. I could legally see a seriously ill psychiatric patient, then go and do brain surgery and finish off the day with a heart transplant (in practice it would be tough as I’d struggle to find a hospital dumb enough to let me do it). Most of what you learn at medical school you don’t need, and frankly patients are much better if you concentrate on about 5% and don’t go near the other 95%.

    Dio

    I once had a GP who sort of tried all those things. He did obstetrics (easy cases), dabbled in hypnotherapy, was an anesthetist in surgery and went on to do sports medicine. He was in fact an absolutely EXCELLENT GP, but admitted that he did all those things because he was bored. He was a stickler for never prescribing antibiotics unless desperately in need so much so that I once had to yell at him to get antibiotics for my son (and a second test). To his credit he rang me the next day and apologised – before he knew that I was right and my son did have a urinary tract infection that was resistant to the first antibiotic. (poor lad had to be circumcised a few years later – ouch).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *