BludgerTrack: 52.3-47.7 to Labor

Two new polls for the week cancel out the slight gain Labor made in last week’s reading of the BludgerTrack poll aggregate.

After recording a slight spike to Labor last week on the back of the Ipsos result, the latest results from Newspoll and Essential Research have brought the BludgerTrack two-party trend reading to about where it was before. This has happened without any changes in the seat projection, in any seat. Newspoll and Essential also both provided leadership ratings, which cause Malcolm Turnbull’s net approval result to improve a little, and Bill Shorten’s to worsen a little. This will be an off week for both the regularly reporting pollsters, but Sky News may step into the breach with a ReachTEL on Sunday morning. We’re also due for Newspoll’s quarterly poll state and demographic breakdowns. Full results from BludgerTrack by clicking on the following:

Preselection news:

• A preselection for the Queensland Liberal National Party Senate ticket has dumped incumbents Ian Macdonald and Barry O’Sullivan in favour of Paul Scarr, described by Jared Owens of The Australian as a “low-profile mining executive”, and Susan McDonald, managing director of a chain of butcher’s shops and member of a Queensland grazing dynasty. The third position goes to Gerard Rennick, a finance executive. Macdonald will have to make do with number four, which was last productive in the freak result of 2004 than delivered the Howard government a Senate majority during its final term. Also frozen out was Scott Emerson, the former minister in Campbell Newman’s government who lost the seat of Maiwar to the Greens in the state election last November.

• The first of two retirement announcements this week from federal Labor MPs in Victoria was that of Michael Danby, who has held Melbourne Ports since 1998. Danby insists the decision was wholly his own choice, which reflects suggestions his pro-Israel outlook may have been contributing to the pressure Labor has increasingly faced in the inner city electorate from the Greens. Three names that have long been mooted as potential successors for Labor preselectionn are Josh Burns, an adviser to Daniel Andrews and former staffer to Danby; Mary Delahunty, a Glen Eira councillor and former mayor (not to be confused with the former state member for Northcote); and Nick Dyrenfurth, executive director of the John Curtin Research Centre. The latter reportedly ruled himself out in February, but has been rated a potential starter in media reports following Danby’s announcement.

• The second was that of Jenny Macklin, who had held Jagajaga since 1996. According to Noel Towell of The Age, the vacancy could finally provide Labor with a solution to its dilemma of how to accommodate Jane Garrett, who refuses to defend her existing state seat of Brunswick from the ever-rising threat of the Greens, and was rebuffed in her bid for a berth in the state upper house. It was earlier suggested that Garrett might get the safe Labor federal seat that was predictably produced by the recently finalised redistribution, but Bill Shorten is now considering taking it instead, as it takes much of his existing seat of Maribyrnong. The redrawn Maribyrnong is perhaps not of interest to Garrett because, as Fairfax recently reported, it was “tipped to turn marginal in the coming years”, although I have my doubts about that personally.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

887 comments on “BludgerTrack: 52.3-47.7 to Labor”

  1. Paul Krugman rips ‘pathetic’ big business as it finally starts to realize the problem with supporting Trump

    The Washington Post reports that U.S. tariffs on China are set to go into effect on Friday, and China plans to respond in kind. If the retaliation escalates, we’ll be in a full-on trade war

    As Paul Krugman explained in a New York Times op-ed Thursday, big business is finally reaping what it has sowed. And we can tell big business is nervous because leaders are finally speaking out against Trump’s tariffs.

    https://www.rawstory.com/2018/07/paul-krugman-rips-pathetic-big-business-finally-starts-realize-problem-supporting-trump/

  2. God bless Paul Krugman’s cotton socks! He has brought back the words that political parties like Labor need to start using again as well as ‘Trickle Down Economics’:
    ‘Voodoo Economics’!
    It worked against Thatcher and Reagan, eventually, and it can work here against Turnbull & Morrison:

    Similarly, organizations like Heritage have long promoted supply-side economics, a.k.a., voodoo economics — the claim that tax cuts will produce huge growth and pay for themselves

    (‘growing the pie’,anyone?)

    — even though no economic experts agree. So they’ve already accepted the principle that it’s O.K. to talk economic nonsense if it’s politically convenient.

    The rest of the article is similarly clear-eyed:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/05/opinion/trade-war-trump-business-jobs.html

  3. Krugman:
    What do I mean by cynical politics? Partly I mean the tacit alliance between businesses and the wealthy, on one side, and racists on the other, that is the essence of the modern conservative movement.

    *cough* Peter Dutton * Malcolm Turnbull.

  4. Dave Donovan
    ‏@davrosz

    I reckon the IPA are cheating on their returns to the charity regulator, the ACNC. In 2017, the claimed to have no FT staff, just 5 volunteers and only $649k income. It was revealed today Rinehart gave them $4.5 million. If true, their charity status could be finished.

  5. Really?

    TOM IN OZ

    @SirThomasWynne
    2h

    There was a record number of telco complaints last year so the Turnbull Government’s answer is to stop the ability to investigate complaints.

    THEY WILL CUT COMPLAINT SERVICES!

  6. Good morning Dawn Patrollers. Pick the bones out of this lot!

    Victoria Cross recipient Ben Roberts-Smith is one of a small number of soldiers subject to investigation by a quasi-judicial inquiry looking into the actions of Australian special forces soldiers in Afghanistan.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/vc-winner-ben-roberts-smith-among-subjects-of-defence-investigation-20180704-p4zpho.html
    Mark Kenny with a good article on all the think tanks Australia has.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/think-tanks-when-too-much-policy-analysis-is-barely-enough-20180622-p4zn2w.html
    Peter van Onselen has a good contribution in which he says that with more and more self-described conservatives taking their lead from Donald Trump, both in style and substance, it’s worth highlighting how fundamentally unconservative Trump’s approach to politics really is. He extends this thinking to Abbott and Hanson.
    https://outline.com/vp7zfR
    Paul Bongiorno tells us about Abbott’s latest demolition job.
    https://outline.com/mY4a6V
    A frustrated Malcolm Knox writes that TV rights are killing access to the world’s biggest sporting event.
    https://www.smh.com.au/sport/soccer/fifa-world-cup-2018/tv-rights-killing-access-to-the-world-s-biggest-sporting-event-20180705-p4zpst.html
    Jess Irvine examines the work of the Commonwealth Grants Commission.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/the-anonymous-public-servants-who-divvy-up-gst-revenue-20180706-p4zpxq.html
    The rather pathetic Dan Tehan has called for a religious discrimination act to provide greater protections to people of faith, in a move that raises the stakes for the Turnbull government as it responds to a key review of religious freedoms.
    https://outline.com/y5RqMH
    Wendy Squires tells us about women’s fertility countdown.
    https://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/life-and-relationships/i-was-well-aware-my-fertility-had-a-use-by-date-20180705-p4zpns.html
    “Dutton is no fascist!” screams Gerard Henderson. And nor is Trump.
    https://outline.com/eUCtu8
    And in yet another court loss a 14-year-old refugee girl who had attempted suicide on Nauru by trying to set herself on fire will be moved to Australia within days.
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/jul/07/refugee-girl-at-risk-of-suicide-to-be-moved-from-nauru-to-australia-after-court-action
    The Turnbull government’s policy of reducing support for asylum seekers living in Australia has left refugee advocates fearing political ideology will leave people homeless.
    https://outline.com/uNLH6h
    Ross Gittins explains the complicated way in which governments shift income form the rich to the poor.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/cash-and-kind-how-governments-shift-income-from-rich-to-poor-20180706-p4zpui.html
    Is Turnbull going to put the Foxtel in the hen house?
    https://outline.com/jaRhEK
    Norm Abjorensen wonders if, under the attack of hostile forces, the ABC will come to an end.
    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/politics/federal/the-end-of-aunty-20180627-p4zo1d.html
    Donald Trump will almost entirely avoid London during his four-day visit to the UK next week, Downing Street has said, unveiling an itinerary that is likely to prompt accusations he is trying to avoid planned protests against him.
    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jul/06/donald-trump-to-avoid-london-during-uk-visit
    Crispin Hull writes on how opinion and fact diverge as Abbott weighs in on climate change…again! He says Abbott scores zero for critical thinking and zero for understanding the scientific method.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/opinion-and-fact-diverge-as-abbott-weighs-in-on-climate-change-again-20180706-p4zpxa.html
    NFF president Fiona Simpson writes about the NEG and agriculture.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/turnbull-s-energy-policy-is-the-only-game-in-town-20180706-p4zpvh.html
    Karen Middleton unloads on the sexism in the Senate.
    https://outline.com/YSNvvR
    Elizabeth Minter explains the double punishment of many prisoners. There is much to consider here.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/debt-trap-people-imprisoned-for-crime-are-being-punished-twice-20180705-p4zplh.html
    Michael Koziol reports that family size would be taken into account when calculating school funding under a radical plan to use parents’ income to determine a school’s wealth for the first time.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/family-size-to-impact-funding-in-radical-reform-plan-for-private-schools-20180706-p4zpy6.html
    Take the time to read this Jack Waterford contribution in which he examines parliamentary behaviour and how the upcoming review of the APS should be focussed.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/parliamentary-bile-finds-its-own-level-20180706-p4zpyl.html
    Tony Walker weighs in on Leyonhjelm and Hanson.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/leyonhjelm-stoush-isn-t-good-for-anybody-except-maybe-leyonhjelm-20180705-p4zpnu.html
    Mike Seccombe unpacks the dark politics of the Timor spy case.
    https://outline.com/jPMjdN
    Independent pharmacists say they have been caught off guard by the Chemist Warehouse model.
    https://outline.com/XYAcMn
    Two funeral insurance businesses may have broken the law, the royal commission into misconduct in banking and financial services has been told. Talk about spivs!
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/banking-and-finance/funeral-insurers-may-have-broken-law-commission-hears-20180706-p4zq0i.html
    https://outline.com/5NzuLx
    Fresh allegations of misconduct have been levelled at ANZ, Bendigo Bank, Commonwealth Bank and Rabobank for their dealings with farmers, on the final day of public hearings for the Hayne royal commission in Darwin.
    https://outline.com/JJx7dt
    The Royal Commission revealed financial services woes for many Indigenous customers. Here’s what can be done.
    https://theconversation.com/the-royal-commission-revealed-financial-services-woes-for-many-indigenous-customers-heres-what-can-be-done-99374
    James Frost tells us how Macquarie avoided a roasting at the banking royal commission.
    https://outline.com/G4Re62
    The Saturday Paper’s Matt Garrick writes on how there appears to be a deliberate push to sell funeral plans into Indigenous communities points to a culture of exploiting the vulnerable by insurance companies.
    https://outline.com/zjgr2x
    Theresa May has secured approval to negotiate a soft Brexit deal with the European Union, signing up her fractious cabinet at a Chequers away day to what had been a controversial plan to match EU standards on food and goods.
    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/jul/06/theresa-may-secures-approval-from-cabinet-to-negotiate-soft-brexit
    Jill Abramson implores Democrats to Trump’s supreme court pick tooth and nail.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jul/06/democrats-fight-trump-supreme-court-merrick-garlan
    Caitlin Fitzsimons argues why the school day should start later.
    https://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/life-and-relationships/school-day-start-later-caitlin-fitzsimmons-20180706-p4zpyi.html
    Richard Wolffe farewells Scott Pruitt, the worst EPA administrator of all time.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jul/05/worst-epa-administrator-scott-pruitt
    Leaked early analysis of the Liberals flagship infrastructure project GlobeLink says it could double freight costs, increase travelling time and threaten the viability of Adelaide airport.
    https://outline.com/NM4MLE
    France’s market watchdog is bracing for a surge in global bond yields and a Wall Street crash as soon as this year, fearing that contagion will spread to Europe and snuff out the fragile recovery.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/markets/risk-of-brutal-correction-in-global-stock-markets-20180706-p4zptb.html
    Australia led the world in the total power of storage batteries installed in 2017, helped by a surge in residential battery installations supporting rooftop solar systems, a new report finds.
    https://outline.com/RVBVCb
    Former NSW Premier and Australian Foreign Minister Bob Carr is a passionate environmental advocate. In an interview with Sue Arnold, he says he can’t keep up with the destruction of his home State under the Berejiklian Government.
    https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/bob-carr-dismayed-by-berejiklians-environmental-destruction,11666
    If you own Bitcoin or any other cryptocurrency be warned. The ATO is coming after you. It has classed these instruments as property, not currency.
    https://outline.com/AEny2g
    Several financial advisers scrambling to secure a new operating licence following the shock shutdown of Dover Financial Group have claimed in a letter to the corporate watchdog that the disgraced firm planned to transfer their clients to another practice without their consent.
    https://outline.com/FuUNXD
    Joanne McCarthy writes that child sexual abuse survivor Peter Gogarty has gone straight to the Pope with a plea for him to sack Archbishop Philip Wilson, and an offer to discuss the reasons why over the phone.
    https://www.theage.com.au/national/dark-secret-child-abuse-survivor-s-plea-to-pope-20180706-p4zpya.html
    Meanwhile the deputy principal of a Melbourne Catholic school is facing fresh allegations of producing child pornography following his arrest in March.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/victoria/melbourne-deputy-principal-charged-with-producing-child-porn-20180706-p4zpy3.html
    Michael West explains homelessness, government outsourcing and “getting kids off the books”
    https://www.michaelwest.com.au/homelessness-government-outsourcing-and-getting-kids-off-the-books/
    Amanda Meade points the finger at SkyNews and its disgusting presenters.
    https://www.theguardian.com/media/2018/jul/06/who-at-sky-takes-the-heat-for-leyonhjelm-debacle-a-young-producer
    Australian consumers have been warned not to trust the “worst” resale ticket scalping offenders – websites Viagogo, Seatwave and StubHub.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/money/consumer/2018/07/06/ticket-scalping-websites/

    Cartoon Corner

    David Pope farewells Pruitt.

    Make David has a couple of good ones today.


    Zanetti channels Norman Lindsay.

    David Pope and the upcoming Trump/Putin meeting.
    https://static.ffx.io/images/$width_828/t_resize_width/t_sharpen%2Cq_auto%2Cf_auto/1197c28e95aa9d54f116d7426917acc1d1aaab07
    Jon Kudelka has Birmingham in the corner.
    https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/bc15a6cbb62ee9253aa67ff07f4de2ab
    More in here.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/best-of-fairfax-cartoons-july-7-2018-20180706-h12d5h.html

  7. I am wondering why the Thai rescuers haven’t run a hose into the cave with coloured smoke (or something) to test whether there is an exit – the smoke would emerge outside and they could isolate the emission point/s to see if there is better access.

    I’m not a geological engineer, obviously, but I would have thought they’d have done that sort of testing.

    Or maybe they have?

  8. Cameron (AnonBlock)
    Friday, July 6th, 2018 – 10:51 pm
    Comment #2070
    As we have discussed here before, Putin is a killer, a thug and a murderer. He has untrammelled power in Russia, supported by an unquestioning state media. This is an excellent documentary that details his rise to power.

    Thanks for that Cameron. No Real Time today so I’ll watch that instead.

  9. jenauthor

    Yesterday we were told that the trapped boys could hear cocks crowing and dogs barking, but the hills are too steep and rough to establish the source of the sounds. (source, ABC reporter).

  10. Interesting report in the afr today about how labor is offering double the spending of the lnp in Braddon and longman.

    It also talks about labor mps saying there will be “a conversation” about shortens leadership post by elections should he lose one or both seats.

    Yet bludgertrack says there is a 2pp swing of 5.6 to labor in qld on. Although on closer inspection this appears to be all regional qld.

  11. Thanks BK.

    Theresa May has secured approval to negotiate a soft Brexit deal with the European Union, signing up her fractious cabinet at a Chequers away day to what had been a controversial plan to match EU standards on food and goods.

    I wonder if people in the UK *really* want to leave the EU? I wonder if voters weren’t carried away by the drama of the referendum and woke up the next day wondering what the hell they’d done. Kind of like the next morning after a big night.

  12. Mike Seccombe unpacks the dark politics of the Timor spy case.

    What a filthy bunch of pricks we have running the place. So contemptuous of us they do not even bother to pretend.

    Professor David Dixon, of the University of NSW Law School, picks up on that point, and notes also that the government appears to have been selective in the way it has laid the charges in this case.

    “It’s notable the people named in the charges [as having communicated with Collaery] are ABC journalists. But the reporter for The Australian who first ran with a story quoting Collaery is not,” he says.

  13. John Falzon making a bid for the new 3rd seat for the ACT. He is truly a great warrior for social justice, and would advance the progressive cause in Parliament.

    ‘Labor’s preselection process is expected to take place in August, however, Dr Falzon must first seek the endorsement of the party’s left faction.

    Nominations open on Wednesday and the faction will vote the following week.

    Dr Falzon has dedicated his working life battling social exclusion, economic insecurity, inequality, housing, health, workers’ rights, and employment and welfare reform.

    It’s something he learnt from his Maltese-born parents, while living in his uncle’s garage in Blacktown, after the family emigrated from London in the 1960s.

    He watched as his working class parents strove to give their children better opportunities, while they themselves faced restricted job prospects.

    Their hard work paid off when Dr Falzon became the first person in his family to attend university, and he later completed a doctorate in social analysis.

    Through his career, he has worked in academia, community development, research and advocacy, and served on a number of boards, including the Australian Council of Social Services, and Australian Social Inclusion Board.

    His work has been recognised through a number of awards, including an Order of Australia Medal in 2015, and as a Australian Human Rights Medal finalist in 2014.

    He has been national chief executive of the St Vincent de Paul Society since 2006.

    Dr Falzon said he wanted to enter parliament as he believed in the “collective project to bring about a more just society”.

    “It can’t be a pipe dream, it is only something governments can deliver, you need legislation to ensure that change,” he said.

    “The kind of society Australians want to live in is a fair one. Opportunities shouldn’t depend on the size of your wallet, society should look out for everyone.

    “It is important to have legislators in parliament who stand in solidarity with those seeking social change.”

    Dr Falzon said neoliberalism under the current government meant “arming the bullies with sticks and telling the victims to stand still”.

    He nominated tax and education as two areas that had re-framed to reward the wealthy.

    “To those who already have much, more will be given.”

    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/canberra-news/vinnies-boss-john-falzon-seeks-nomination-for-new-seat-of-canberra-20180706-p4zq0k.html

  14. It’s a game of economic chicken and a game I can’t see the US winning.

    The Chinese government turned the table on President Trump on Friday and responded to his trade threats with tariffs of their own against U.S. companies, marking the latest example of the U.S. leader trying to exert leverage but finding himself confronted with rejection and retaliation.

    The escalating problems with China demonstrate how one of Trump’s most favored tactics in business — trying to create leverage by cornering an opponent — has not been particularly effective in the White House.

    Trump has tried this approach with foreign policy, immigration, budgeting, private companies and frequently on trade. White House officials had hoped that threatening to impose tariffs on China would force Beijing to offer concessions, but talks fizzled out quickly and both countries moved forward with punitive measures that analysts believe could harm two of the world’s leading economies.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/china-joins-a-growing-list-of-countries-to-brush-off-trumps-trade-threats/2018/07/06/18ff1ef2-8067-11e8-b660-4d0f9f0351f1_story.html?utm_term=.238ff520035f

  15. John Falzon – what does he get paid by Vinnies to “advocate for the poor” sprocket.
    Always funny to see someone earning more than 200k loudly proclaiming how their an advocate for the poor.
    How does a self proclaimed labor hack continue to run a non political charity – surely he has to resign immediately ?

  16. Protesters get permission to fly ‘Trump Baby’ balloon over London during presidential visit

    Donald Trump to avoid London during UK visit

    Donald Trump will almost entirely avoid London during his four-day visit to the UK next week, Downing Street has said, unveiling an itinerary that is likely to prompt accusations he is trying to avoid planned protests against him.
    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jul/06/donald-trump-to-avoid-london-during-uk-visit?CMP=twt_gu&__twitter_impression=true

  17. I’d love to know what the Russians have over today’s Republicans. It obviously isn’t just Donald Trump who is indebted.

    “What does July 4th mean to me? Freedom,” Sen. Ron Johnson chirruped on Twitter on Independence Day.

    For the Wisconsin Republican, it meant, specifically, the freedom to spend July 4 in Moscow with seven other Republican lawmakers posing for propaganda photos with Russian officials. On the same day it was reported in Britain that two more people had been poisoned by a Russian nerve agent British officials say came from Vladimir Putin’s regime. On the day after the Senate Intelligence Committee affirmed the U.S. intelligence community’s conclusion that Russia interfered in the election to help Donald Trump.

    Johnson and his colleagues exercised their freedom not to meet publicly with opposition or civil society figures (those whom the Putin regime has not imprisoned or killed), avoiding the risk of offending their hosts. They also exercised their freedom to soft-pedal their criticism of the Russian government, leading Russian politicians and state media to mock them as supplicants.

    Yet despite this lavish display of the freedom to kowtow, they didn’t get the meeting they hoped for with Putin himself. He was busy, the Kremlin said.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/eight-republicans-spent-july-4-in-russia-where-are-the-fireworks/2018/07/06/beae30be-812e-11e8-b658-4f4d2a1aeef1_story.html?utm_term=.6736cec3003c

  18. Not really sprocket, hypocrites who pretend their fighting for the poor whilst leading a champagne lifestyle are disgusting.

  19. Despite being ‘boned’ by the QLD LNP preselectors, who promoted a butcher shop owner above Big Barry, I suspect his string of negatively geared properties will be some consolation for his time with his nose in the trough.

    Barry could also have a chat with his mate James Ashby, who he famously connected up with some ‘pro bono’ lawyers to do the stitch up of Peter Slipper.

  20. I just took a look at the detailed figures of the Latest Bludgertrack update. Quite remarkable really that it is still projecting a nineteen seat gain to Labor, even after the adjustment to its calculations to accommodate the vagaries of the PHON preference flows (and Newspoll’s adjustment for the same reason).

    I’m not convinced on the Queensland figures though. It’s hard to credit that Labor will take eight seats from the Liberals in that state with everything that’s been going on. Even so, Bludgertrack has a remarkably accurate record since its inception (about a 1% MOE I think William has said) so it does give one a big lift in spirits on a cold, wind blown, rainy day here in Melbourne.

  21. ESJ

    We can’t have kids from migrant families reaching above their station, can we. You are pathetic parroting Liberal old money lines.

  22. C@tmomma says:
    Saturday, July 7, 2018 at 7:24 am
    God bless Paul Krugman’s cotton socks! He has brought back the words that political parties like Labor need to start using again as well as ‘Trickle Down Economics’:
    ‘Voodoo Economics’!
    It worked against Thatcher and Reagan, eventually, and it can work here against Turnbull & Morrison:

    Good suggestion C@t. You have contacts in the Labor party. Perhaps you can get the message through to them.

  23. Yeah nah sprocket.

    So the charity regulator reveals:

    The vinnies National office has employee expenses of 985k in 2017 and 9 employees as well as executive expenses of 85k.
    Now maybe it’s all very socialist and everybody including the receptionist gets paid 100k or maybe someone is getting very well paid advocating for “the poor”.

  24. I remember seeing MT handing a piddly $5 to a homeless person.

    That’d be like the rest of us cutting a 5 cent piece into tenths and giving said homeless person a second to sniff it – for all the effect that level of charity would have had on MTs purse strings

  25. Darn

    GWH Bush used the term Voodoo Economic against Reagan in 1980. I don’t think we can afford to wait as long as we did to get rid of Ronny and Maggie T.

  26. jenauthor

    With a camera close by.

    Perhaps we’re misjudging MT. Perhaps he went around the city giving $5 to every homeless person there.
    Or perhaps not.

  27. Ides of March.not logged in says:
    Saturday, July 7, 2018 at 8:39 am
    Whisperings that Jane Garrett may nominate for Jagajaga now that Jenny Macklin is retiring.

    Good to hear after the shameful way she has been treated by Daniel Andrews and the UFU.

  28. <p.sprocket_ says:
    Saturday, July 7, 2018 at 8:49 am
    ESJ

    We can’t have kids from migrant families reaching above their station, can we. You are pathetic parroting Liberal old money lines.

    The Liberals love people being “aspirational”. Some people aspire to become wealthy and powerful. Others aspire to improve society.

  29. jenauthor @ #15 Saturday, July 7th, 2018 – 8:06 am

    I am wondering why the Thai rescuers haven’t run a hose into the cave with coloured smoke (or something) to test whether there is an exit – the smoke would emerge outside and they could isolate the emission point/s to see if there is better access.

    I’m not a geological engineer, obviously, but I would have thought they’d have done that sort of testing.

    Or maybe they have?

    Someone did it from the top I think.

    But I guess that they have more urgent things to do like getting in air and food . The depletion of the oxygen levels suggests that there is not some easy flow of air

  30. Yeah citizen I just reckon you should be more critical then accepting an article in the Canberra Times unquestionably. The Charity Regulator tells you the true story, sprocket threw in a red herring there to hide his embarrasment.

  31. lizzie says:
    Saturday, July 7, 2018 at 7:47 am
    Dave Donovan
    ‏@davrosz

    I reckon the IPA are cheating on their returns to the charity regulator, the ACNC. In 2017, the claimed to have no FT staff, just 5 volunteers and only $649k income. It was revealed today Rinehart gave them $4.5 million. If true, their charity status could be finished.

    It will be interesting to see what happens now, given that the recently appointed head of ACNC is ex-IPA.

  32. Not really sprocket, hypocrites who pretend their fighting for the poor whilst leading a champagne lifestyle are disgusting.

    Do you know for a fact that Falzon spends whatever it is that he earns on a “champagne lifestyle”?

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