YouGov-Forty Acres: Coalition 34, Labor 32, Greens 12, One Nation 9

A largely unchanged result on voting intention for a poll that records a slight improvement in Pauline Hanson’s personal standing, and growing concern about North Korea.

The latest fortnightly YouGov poll has Labor down a point on the primary vote to 32%, the Coalition steady on 34%, the Greens up two to 12% and One Nation down one to 9%, with the combined result for all others steady on an ample 13%. The respondent-allocated two-party result shifts a point in Labor’s favour to reach 50-50, with the Greens both increasing their primary vote and recorded a somewhat stronger flow of preferences to Labor. The results remain peculiar for the high overall level of minor party and independent voting.

Also featured are a comprehensive seat of leadership ratings: Malcolm Turnbull on 44% approval (down one on six weeks ago) and 48% disapproval (up one); Bill Shorten on 43% (up one) and 46% (down one); Pauline Hanson on 42% (up three) and 50% (down two); Richard Di Natale on 26% (up one) and 39% (up one); Nick Xenophon on 52% (up two) and 28% (up three); Bob Katter on 36% (up three) and 41% (down two); Tony Abbott on 34% (steady) and 57% (up one); and Christopher Pyne on 32% (up one) and 44% (steady). Other findings are that 66% are worried about North Korea, up 12% on eight weeks ago, with 29% not worried, down 11%. Fully 43% would support military action in response to the missile test, with an equal number opposed. Sixty-four per cent would support banning the niqab, with 26% opposed; for the burqa, 67% support and 24% opposition; but for the hijab, 29% support and 61% opposition.

The poll was conducted Thursday to Monday from a sample of 1032.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,400 comments on “YouGov-Forty Acres: Coalition 34, Labor 32, Greens 12, One Nation 9”

  1. Go Bill!

    Does anyone remember Michael Costa? An unpleasant memory I am trying to lose.

    Paywalled so google the heading.

    Shorten says he won’t be silenced on electricity privatisation

    Bill Shorten has doubled down in his criticism of electricity privatisation arguing Jeff Kennett’s reforms were a failure that lead to rising energy prices.

    Mr Shorten stared down criticism from the former Victorian premier and from former NSW Labor treasurer Michael Costa who yesterday said the Labor leader was “ignorant” for arguing privatisation had lead to higher prices.

    Mr Shorten said this morning the former political heavyweights were “wrong”.

    “Anyone who has been to Victoria and lived in this state with the (State Electricity Commission), which was government owned, we saw the power generators privatised in Victoria in the 1990s,” Mr Shorten said.

    “The problem is that, ever since then, our power prices have gone up as big private companies have tried to extract more profits out of the power system and the energy generation system.

    “I won’t be silenced on criticising privatisation in the electricity industry just because some people don’t agree with me.”

    Mr Shorten said most Victorians thought the Kennett government’s decision to sell the state’s electricity assets was a mistake.

    “I think most Victorians agree with me; they look at the privatisation and they see out of control prices and more unreliable power,” Mr Shorten said.

    And boofhead Kennett has to stick his head up. Kick it Bill!

    Mr Kennett said Mr Shorten had proved he was “yesterday’s man, with yesterday’s ideas and he has absolutely no relevance to Australia in 2017, and sadly he has absolutely no relevance for Aus­tralia into the future’’.

    “It is not that privatisation was wrong; it is the failure of governments since then to work with the private sector to develop an industry that was going to meet the needs of the Australian community,” Mr Kennett said.

  2. @P1

    You mean they should just fix stuff instead of just offering endless money right? We paid $50-$60B for Fraudband which already had massive problems and you expect to get a handout for a day or a week? Just so private companies or public companies don’t fix their sh!t?

  3. CTar1 @ #1354 Friday, September 8th, 2017 – 9:03 pm

    P1

    “How brilliant is this government, eh?”

    … or turn off their pool pump for 30 minutes

    The ultimate sacrifice ….

    I suggest you read the article and note some of the numbers in it.

    To build generation and distribution up to the level required for maybe a few hours a year is extremely expensive. The better option is to take action to chop off that peak demand, particularly if there is no real disadvantage to anyone.

  4. Tony Windsor likely to run against Baaarnyard

    ““I haven’t made any decisions one way or the other but it’s on the table. I’d say better than 50 per cent,” he said.

    Recent polling conducted in New England for the CFMEU found Mr Joyce would be under extreme pressure if Mr Windsor entered the race.

    The former MP would have pulled close to 38 per cent of the primary vote if an election had been called in August and favourable preferences could make it a knife-edge contest. ”

    http://www.tenterfieldstar.com.au/story/3324430/windsor-return-could-topple-barnaby-joyce-poll/

  5. If only the funding of this was half of what breast cancer rates …

    The success of prostate operations by the first ever robotic surgeon in a NSW public hospital is proof the technology should be expanded, says the doctor who first lobbied for it.

    Older surgery takes several days’ hospital recovery time and a couple of months off work
    With robotic surgery most patients discharged within a day, back at work in under 2 weeks
    Every year more than 3,500 men will die from the disease

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australia, but the price tag to have the latest minimally invasive surgery is often too high for many {male} Australians.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-08/hope-free-access-to-robotic-proctectomy-could-save-lives/8885688

  6. CTar1 @ #1364 Friday, September 8th, 2017 – 9:18 pm

    If only the funding of this was half of what breast cancer rates …

    The success of prostate operations by the first ever robotic surgeon in a NSW public hospital is proof the technology should be expanded, says the doctor who first lobbied for it.

    Older surgery takes several days’ hospital recovery time and a couple of months off work
    With robotic surgery most patients discharged within a day, back at work in under 2 weeks
    Every year more than 3,500 men will die from the disease

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in Australia, but the price tag to have the latest minimally invasive surgery is often too high for many {male} Australians.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-08/hope-free-access-to-robotic-proctectomy-could-save-lives/8885688

    My brother met the robot.
    All good now.

  7. CTar1 @ #1128 Friday, September 8th, 2017 – 8:36 am

    On refurbishment of Liddel – I’m very reluctantly of the view that one of the NSW coal fired stations will need to be kept online.

    Decisions that needed to be made over the last decade have not been made.

    It will be expensive but necessary

    Problem is that it’s not necessarily a problem that can be solved with money. Take Muja in Western Australia, the WA government threw $308m at a failed effort to refurbish the A & B units (they “finished” the job, then the fuck up fairy turned up and worked some magic)

    I work for a company with contracts at Muja, Synergy is throwing money at Muja to keep it running – and I’m not talking about the A& B units, they’ve been turned off for ages, I’m talking about the “newer” units from the 80’s.

    If we are going to throw money at the problem, may as well throw money at CST, large scale PV and large scale batteries. At least we know those three work and they’ll be brand new.

  8. CTar1 @ #1366 Friday, September 8th, 2017 – 9:32 pm

    bemused

    A surgeon who specialises in key hole stuff described the machine in action to me as ‘a thing of beauty’.

    My brother had no complaints.

    I think they are also pretty quick so one machine should get through quite a few procedures in a day.

    You would think with the savings in surgical time and recovery in hospital, plus the productivity saved, they would be a bargain.

  9. Despite being late to the subject I’d like to thank the bludgers who posted their experiences about being discriminated against as a gay person/couple.

    I’m an educated white man, so have no experience of discrimination. I appreciate you sharing your insights.

  10. I wonder how far back this inquiry will look?

    I was the victim of a “Bank Robbery” perpetrated by CBA and another organised crime gang and would love to give evidence against the crooks.

    CBA inquiry given wide scope

    For the Commonwealth Bank to welcome APRA’s three appointments to the independent panel inquiring into the bank, and then pledge the lender’s full co-operation, is a bit like rolling out a red carpet for the local sheriff who’s come to tip your house upside down.

    Rest assured, this will not be a pleasant experience for CBA.

    The panel’s members have the right blend of experience and broad terms of reference, their powers are significant, and there’s a determination — once and for all — to get to the bottom of CBA’s predilection for stuff-ups.

    If anyone needs reminding, the list is a long and painful one — Storm Financial (2012), poor financial advice (2014), rejected insurance claims by CommInsure (2016), and the August 3 money-laundering allegations by Austrac that broke the dam wall.

    All four terms of reference would have come as no surprise to CBA.

    Perhaps the only concern would be the usual catch-all phrase that enables the inquiry to pretty much chart its own course.

    APRA has tasked the panel to assess whether any of six specified functions “at a minimum” are conflicting with sound risk management and compliance outcomes.

    It’s an open invitation to John Laker, Jillian Broadbent and Graeme Samuel to turn the place upside down.

    Laker, whose appointment was foreshadowed by The Australian, is Wayne Byres’ predecessor as APRA chairman, and will know exactly where to look for the “core organisational and cultural drivers” that have contributed to CBA’s governance lapses.

    The six areas he and the panel have been invited to probe are the bank’s organisational structure, governance framework and culture, its delegation of risk management and compliance responsibilities, the group’s financial objectives, and its remuneration and accountability frameworks.

    The final area is CBA’s framework for identification, escalation and addressing matters of concern raised by the bank’s staff, regulators or customers.

    To varying degrees, the Austrac debacle has spotlighted all of these areas.

    For example, part of the compliance function reported through to the chief financial officer, which is unusual although CBA chief executive Ian Narev has said it’s part of the bank’s complex, matrix reporting structure.

    CBA’s capacity to escalate and address matters of concern has also been questioned, after the Austrac statement of claim alleged that the bank failed to respond to warnings and tip-offs from law enforcement.

    There is very little precedent for this inquiry, with the probe into National Australia Bank’s currency options crisis in 2004 the only similar exercise.

    That inquiry was undertaken by APRA staff as opposed to an independent panel, with NAB deciding to make the final report public.

  11. Money could be justified on extending the life of Liddel, but only if that was a as result of a proper decision process.

    Apparently Liddel isn’t considered as very good plant, a but like a ‘Monday car’ – before they were put together by robotics.

    It is likely that by 2022 there will be better, cheaper alternatives for ‘baseload’ power.

  12. BW
    No. Goyder is buried in the small old part of Stirling Cemetery, well within the line with ample rainfall (I can assure you).

    Also buried there is Privete John Leak VC -WW1. An interesting tale. He lived into the 70’s – didn’t believe in war and never marched on Anzac Day.

  13. Simon Katich
    ” didn’t believe in war and never marched on Anzac Day.”
    .
    Yep, as did my WWI vet GGG uncles and GG’father. As one of the uncles said to me as a wee ‘un “If there is ever another war don’t you be stupid enough to go.”.

  14. Simon Katich @ #1374 Friday, September 8th, 2017 – 9:52 pm

    BW
    No. Goyder is buried in the small old part of Stirling Cemetery, well within the line with ample rainfall (I can assure you).

    Also buried there is Privete John Leak VC -WW1. An interesting tale. He lived into the 70’s – didn’t believe in war and never marched on Anzac Day.

    The 1970s is 50 years or so after the end of WWI, so not all that remarkable he lived into the 7os. There was only 21 years between the end of WWI and the start of WWII.
    I think there are still a few WWII veterans lingering on.

  15. sprocket_ @ #1360 Friday, September 8th, 2017 – 9:09 pm

    Tony Windsor likely to run against Baaarnyard

    ““I haven’t made any decisions one way or the other but it’s on the table. I’d say better than 50 per cent,” he said.

    Recent polling conducted in New England for the CFMEU found Mr Joyce would be under extreme pressure if Mr Windsor entered the race.

    The former MP would have pulled close to 38 per cent of the primary vote if an election had been called in August and favourable preferences could make it a knife-edge contest. ”

    http://www.tenterfieldstar.com.au/story/3324430/windsor-return-could-topple-barnaby-joyce-poll/

    Polling also repeatedly showed this seat as very close in the lead-up to the last election, and was wrong.

  16. bemused

    I think there are still a few WWII veterans lingering on.

    Not very many of the early starters.

    My father would have been 102 yrs yesterday.

    Alas, long gone.

  17. Bemused, yeah – the living into the 70’s isn’t the interesting part. It was only pertinent in that it showed how many Anzac days he chose not to attend.

    An interesting aside is that he lived in Verdun South Australia for a while after he fled his home town in QLD due to the unwanted fame his VC brought him. Verdun was previously known as Grunthal (or something like that) as there were plenty of German settlers in the area, but the name changed after (during?) WW1.

  18. I read the other day that there is still a single US Civil war pensioner alive and getting $71/month.

    Apparently she is the adopted daughter of a then 80 year old veteran who married her mother. It would seem that both mother and daughter were intellectually disabled in some way, so the daughter remained a dependent and is now a very old lady.

  19. Simon Katich @ #1381 Friday, September 8th, 2017 – 10:31 pm

    Bemused, yeah – the living into the 70’s isn’t the interesting part. It was only pertinent in that it showed how many Anzac days he chose not to attend.

    An interesting aside is that he lived in Verdun South Australia for a while after he fled his home town in QLD due to the unwanted fame his VC brought him. Verdun was previously known as Grunthal (or something like that) as there were plenty of German settlers in the area, but the name changed after (during?) WW1.

    The town of Holbrook in NSW used to be ‘Germantown’ because of all the German settlers in the area.

    I was always puzzled why an inland town like that had a replica of a submarine and eventually stopped to read the plaque.

    The town got re-named after Captain Holbrook who captained the AE1 submarine which penetrated the Dardanelles in WW1.

  20. daretotread @ #1384 Friday, September 8th, 2017 – 10:36 pm

    I read the other day that there is still a single US Civil war pensioner alive and getting $71/month.

    Apparently she is the adopted daughter of a then 80 year old veteran who married her mother. It would seem that both mother and daughter were intellectually disabled in some way, so the daughter remained a dependent and is now a very old lady.

    Would be living the high life on $71/month.

  21. Freeburgh – a little town in our shire – was once Germantown.

    The first home we bought was in Leak Street. I thought it was a comment about the location (marshy) until I realised the whole neighbourhood was named in honour of VCs.

  22. **Apparently Liddel isn’t considered as very good plant, a but like a ‘Monday car’**
    Turnbull would know this. He is a details man, you know.

  23. [Simon Katich
    Bemused, yeah – the living into the 70’s isn’t the interesting part. It was only pertinent in that it showed how many Anzac days he chose not to attend.

    An interesting aside is that he lived in Verdun South Australia for a while after he fled his home town in QLD due to the unwanted fame his VC brought him. Verdun was previously known as Grunthal (or something like that) as there were plenty of German settlers in the area, but the name changed after (during?) WW1.]

    SA with its early German migrants had many German place names that were changed because of the war.

    http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/push-to-revive-south-australian-towns-with-german-names-lost-under-wwi-act-of-parliament/news-story/2714315c7f071f494a645453e41de51f

  24. I’ve played against Gaza Football and Cricket Club many times in the past with no idea where the name came from.

    The Wiki link below shows that Gaza was the war name given to Klemzig and the club maintained the name even when Klemzig was reestablished as the name.

  25. Most of the spouses of senior British royalty were German from the Glorious Revolution (and accompanying ban on Catholic spouses) until after WWI because Germany had the majority of protestant royalty between its many royal families. The holding of the throne of Hanover by all British Kings between George I and William IV (Victoria did not get it because it was a men only throne) was probably also a contributor.

  26. zoidlord @ #1347 Friday, September 8th, 2017 – 6:45 pm

    @P1

    Umm sounds like some dodgy tax cuts which is aimed at business.

    Demand Side Management is old news in WA and has been going on for years. There is very good money to be made if you are a large consumer and are prepared to cut your consumption during peak grid events, which last summer consisted of (IIRC) 12 30-minute intervals over the spread of summer.

  27. bemused @ #1358 Friday, September 8th, 2017 – 7:08 pm

    CTar1 @ #1354 Friday, September 8th, 2017 – 9:03 pm

    P1

    “How brilliant is this government, eh?”

    … or turn off their pool pump for 30 minutes

    The ultimate sacrifice ….

    I suggest you read the article and note some of the numbers in it.

    To build generation and distribution up to the level required for maybe a few hours a year is extremely expensive. The better option is to take action to chop off that peak demand, particularly if there is no real disadvantage to anyone.

    That’s how DSM works. A good friend of mine is the energy manager for a very large consumer of electricity and the DSM payment rips a big chunk out of their yearly electricity bill, not to mention that their capacity charge is lower because of their reduced consumption during the handful (12 x 30 minute intervals last summer in WA IIRC) of peak grid events that occurred last summer.

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