Comings and goings

More internal party jockeying ahead of a federal election most expect to be held later this year.

Another week’s worth of federal preselection developments. For the latest on the Western Australian election campaign, see the post below.

Richard Ferguson of The Australian reports there is “speculation” Senator Kristina Keneally might move to the House of Representatives amid a preselection battle with Right faction colleague Deborah O’Neill, in which the winner will get the factionally reserved top position on the ticket while the loser will be relegated to highly loseable third place.

• Nick Champion, who has held the seat of Spence (formerly Wakefield) for Labor since 2007, will move to state politics in the safe seat of Taylor at the next election in March 2022. Champion is aligned with the socially conservative Shop Distributive Allied and Employees Association sub-faction of the Right, and is a member of the pro-coal mining Otis Group. No apparent word on who might be in line to replace him in Spence, which is now a safe seat.

The Brisbane Times reports the preselection of Graham Perrett, who has held the Brisbane seat of Moreton for Labor since 2007, faces a preselection challenge from state party secretary Julie-Ann Campbell, who among other things has affirmative action considerations in her favour.

• The South Australian Liberals have finalised their Senate ticket, with incumbents Simon Birmingham and Andrew McLachlan taking the top two positions and the third going to Kerrynne Liddle, a factional moderate of indigenous background who works as a staffer to Social Services Minister and SA Senator Anne Ruston. Tom Richardson of InDaily reports Liddle was chosen ahead of state party vice-president Rachel Swift by a margin of 130 to 78.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,276 comments on “Comings and goings”

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  1. Scout @ #1194 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 7:15 pm

    Victim blaming has started……apparently the ‘complainant’ is confused according to the PM.

    He will need to check with Jen about where his moral compass is aligned to.

    I think it is fair to say that the young woman was confused about how to deal with the problem before.

    However, by going public, she ain’t taking shit from anyone anymore. More power to her arm!

  2. GG -nope she wasn’t confused about how to deal with the problem (she experienced trauma and shared that with others), those who were confronted with the problem were confused. Including the PM, he has known about this for longer than 24 hours.

  3. Re GG @7:31. Stephen Bradbury sails through the finish line ahead of a bunch of people sliding around on their arses crashing into walls. Looks like a win to me.

  4. Scout @ #1203 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 7:37 pm

    GG -nope she wasn’t confused about how to deal with the problem (she experienced trauma and shared that with others), those who were confronted with the problem were confused. Including the PM, he has known about this for longer than 24 hours.

    She sat on it and my understanding she publicly decided not to press the issue further months ago. So, now she goes full on. That looks like a confusing and confused response to me. Sure, she was embarassed, trying to hang on to Party and Personal contacts and being totally subservient in her response at the time to achieve career goals.

    But now after reflection she’s decided it is a battle worth fighting.

    I am totally supportive of her current actions and wish her nothing but being able to make a statement that we all must learn from.

  5. boerwarsays:
    Tuesday, February 16, 2021 at 5:28 pm
    Morrison’s persistently abuses his wife and daughters as grist to the political mill.
    ——————————————————-
    I’ve got no time at all for Morrison, but that’s a bit of a stretch.

  6. ‘That looks like a confusing and confused response to me.’

    GG that is a value statement.

    She is so lucky you approve of her ‘current actions’ and think she was previously confused.

    Why is it about her being ‘confused’ as opposed to what has occurred…..once again.

  7. GG

    But now after reflection she’s decided it is a battle worth fighting.

    ________________________________

    She said that it was seeing Morrison present Grace Tame with The Australian of the Year award that moved her. Not clear whether it was Morrison’s involvement or Tame’s own battle that got her going.

  8. Scout @ #1207 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 7:57 pm

    ‘That looks like a confusing and confused response to me.’

    GG that is a value statement.

    She is so lucky you approve of her ‘current actions’ and think she was previously confused.

    Why is it about her being ‘confused’ as opposed to what has occurred…..once again.

    Scout,

    You give me an alternative narrative to explain the events before and after and I’ll listen.

    I didn’t say I approve. I said I support. She’s the one that has to live the consequences.

    She’s on a tough journey. I wish her well.

  9. Scout @ #1210 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 8:11 pm

    GG – you need to come up with your own narrative, not my job.

    This sort of narrative is not helpful:

    ‘She’s the one that has to live the consequences.’

    My narrative is the one you don’t like.

    So, I’ll let you come up with some alternatives.

    There always consequences for any decision you take or choose not to take.

    Some have more lasting impact on your life than others.

    Life is like that.

    Cheers.

  10. Greensborough Growler @ #1205 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 6:48 pm

    Sure, she was embarassed, trying to hang on to Party and Personal contacts and being totally subservient in her response at the time to achieve career goals.

    If by “career goals” you mean “not have career permanently, maliciously ruined by the Libral patriarchs and their private-sector mates when they retaliate against her for speaking out”, then yes.

  11. a r @ #1214 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 8:24 pm

    Greensborough Growler @ #1205 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 6:48 pm

    Sure, she was embarassed, trying to hang on to Party and Personal contacts and being totally subservient in her response at the time to achieve career goals.

    If by “career goals” you mean “not have career permanently, maliciously ruined by the Libral patriarchs and their private-sector mates when they retaliate against her for speaking out”, then yes.

    I think the saying that covers this is, “You’got to along to get along”.

  12. The old ‘I don’t need to know about that’ therefore I don’t. Or ‘not brought to my attention’ because I didn’t give it any, attention.

    The prime minister’s office was involved in managing the incident from the beginning.

    But despite the engagement of at least two of his staff, Mr Morrison said he was not made aware until 24 hours ago.

    “I’m not happy about the fact it was not brought to my attention,” he said.

    Something about pub tests comes to mind.

  13. NSW District Court Acting Judge Colin Charteris got a bit of dressing down by the Court of Criminal Appeal, for among other things, telling the prisoner in the dock, “You conducted yourself as though you would not have a judgment day. You were mistaken. That judgment day is today.” Justice Hamill responded, “the ominous quasi-religious flavour of the reference to ‘judgment day’ was unnecessary and inappropriate”. I wonder if Charteris is a part-time pastor when he’s not acting as an acting judge(?).

    https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/multi-million-dollar-conman-s-sentence-cut-with-emotive-judge-criticised-20210216-p572ts.html

  14. NSW has been overusing acting judges for as long as I have been practicing? Some weird stuff happens.

    When at the bar, I instructed Col in a case where he asked a fairly innocuous question for which the response was:

    “What are you looking at, ….?”

  15. Earlier this week, Feb 2021, I thought I’d found an interesting role …

    Isn’t it nice to know that some are more off with the fairies than a brazen and inept ‘PM’? Even an asphalt, concrete, developers, gaming oriented premier?

    So reassuring.

    Here’s part of the response: “… We would like to take the opportunity to wish you and your family a safe and happy Christmas.

    The Department of xyz will be shut down over the Christmas period Friday 25 December 2020 to Friday 8 January 2021.

    The abc Team we will be taking a break over the Christmas and New Year period and no recruitment actions will take place during this time.

    We will be back in the office from Monday 11 January 2021 and will resume all recruitment actions from this time.

    Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!“

    I get a response like this early Jan, but second half of Feb?

  16. Greensborough Growler @ #1223 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 9:18 pm

    ItzaDream @ #1221 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 9:11 pm

    I’d proffer ‘evolving’ instead of ‘confusing’.

    A thoughtful contribution.

    But, evolving would indicate a victim plan to deal with the rape over time. I’d need evidence to accept that sort of proposal.

    I doesn’t mean that to me. I mean evolving in response to changing circumstances. At the very least, she said she was changed by the Australian of the Year situation. Whether she had a plan or not, at whatever level of consciousness, I think she’s allowed change, without being seen as confused. We’re probably saying the same thing, with you putting more emphasis on her machinations, while I’m putting more emphasis on externals.

  17. ItzaDream @ #730 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 9:08 pm

    The old ‘I don’t need to know about that’ therefore I don’t. Or ‘not brought to my attention’ because I didn’t give it any, attention.

    The prime minister’s office was involved in managing the incident from the beginning.

    But despite the engagement of at least two of his staff, Mr Morrison said he was not made aware until 24 hours ago.

    “I’m not happy about the fact it was not brought to my attention,” he said.

    Something about pub tests comes to mind.

    So the question then becomes, why wasn’t it brought to Morrison’s attention by Yaron Finkelstein?

    The answer is obvious. The guy is so steeped in the black arts of being a political minder that he knew NOT to bring it to Morrison’s attention and to try and manage it himself, to the extent that he hoped to be able to manage it well enough that it would disappear off the political radar.

    So now, because the young lady was courageous enough to speak out, Finkelstein’s work has been unpicked and Morrison is having to deal with it. And the Plausible Deniability ruse is on very shaky ground beneath Morrison.

  18. Hmm. At least Judge Charteris did not tweet this:

    “Finally, having imposed what appears to be the highest sentence recorded in New South Wales for offending of this kind, the sentencing Judge delivered what he described as a “pep talk” to the media:
    “There are a number of people from the media here. My experience is that the media seem to go deaf after the minimum period is announced, and I’ve often seen articles written which only contain the minimum period. The fact is, a lot of people do not get granted their parole at the end of the non-parole period. And many people aren’t released until they have served all of their sentence. I’ve imposed an effective sentence of 16 years imprisonment with 12 years non-parole. I was rather hoping, if there be any headlines, they not say 12 years imprisonment because it’s important that it is a 16 year sentence. The offender is doing well in the prison system in trying to be productive, but it will be the parole authority’s decision in ten years time. So that ends my pep talk for the media.”[7]

  19. C@tmomma @ #1228 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 9:30 pm

    ItzaDream @ #730 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 9:08 pm

    The old ‘I don’t need to know about that’ therefore I don’t. Or ‘not brought to my attention’ because I didn’t give it any, attention.

    The prime minister’s office was involved in managing the incident from the beginning.

    But despite the engagement of at least two of his staff, Mr Morrison said he was not made aware until 24 hours ago.

    “I’m not happy about the fact it was not brought to my attention,” he said.

    Something about pub tests comes to mind.

    So the question then becomes, why wasn’t it brought to Morrison’s attention by Yaron Finkelstein?

    The answer is obvious. The guy is so steeped in the black arts of being a political minder that he knew NOT to bring it to Morrison’s attention and to try and manage it himself, to the extent that he hoped to be able to manage it well enough that it would disappear off the political radar.

    So now, because the young lady was courageous enough to speak out, Finkelstein’s work has been unpicked and Morrison is having to deal with it. And the Plausible Deniability ruse is on very shaky ground beneath Morrison.

    I’m not buying it. He’s a control freak, controlling what he knows, and what he doesn’t know. I’m saying it was brought to his notice, but not his attention. The question I’d be asking is ‘did you at any stage have any hint of an idea that this had happened?’

  20. Acting judges are normally appointed so as to get around the rule that judges must retire at 70. Seventy is a bit arbitrary as many at this age are still in possession of their marbles. Look, for instance, at how many retired judges head inquires of one form or another.

  21. ItzaDream @ #1227 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 9:29 pm

    Greensborough Growler @ #1223 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 9:18 pm

    ItzaDream @ #1221 Tuesday, February 16th, 2021 – 9:11 pm

    I’d proffer ‘evolving’ instead of ‘confusing’.

    A thoughtful contribution.

    But, evolving would indicate a victim plan to deal with the rape over time. I’d need evidence to accept that sort of proposal.

    I doesn’t mean that to me. I mean evolving in response to changing circumstances. At the very least, she said she was changed by the Australian of the Year situation. Whether she had a plan or not, at whatever level of consciousness, I think she’s allowed change, without being seen as confused. We’re probably saying the same thing, with you putting more emphasis on her machinations, while I’m putting more emphasis on externals.

    OK.

  22. Acting judges are normally appointed so as to get around the rule that judges must retire at 70. Seventy is a bit arbitrary as many at this age are still in possession of their marbles.

    Well, I expect to still be in full possession of all my marbles this time next year.

    Certainly age 70 is too young, although a retirement provision is a good idea. Fraser’s referendum should have specified “an age, not less than 70, to be determined by Parliament” or something similar, with appropriate grandfathering provisions.

  23. Ah. According to Brittany Higgins the contact with Finkelstein was via WhatsApp. Is that considered a ‘phone call’?

    Mr Morrison said phone records and other files showed his principal private secretary, Yaron Finkelstein, did not call Ms Higgins late last year as she had claimed.

    This should be easy to prove, one way or the other:

    She also said Mr Finkelstein made a “strange sort of check-in” about the matter and that similar calls “happened to me kind of pretty regularly” after the events.

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/dispute-erupts-over-timing-of-pm-s-knowledge-of-parliament-rape-claim-20210216-p5730i.html

  24. Steve777:

    Tuesday, February 16, 2021 at 9:48 pm

    [‘Well, I expect to still be in full possession of all my marbles this time next year.’]

    Beware, the day after I turned 70 everything went downhill.

  25. Whats App is basically an IP phone call in that it by-passes the PSTN (public switched telephone network). That way, Morrison has some sort of plausible denial. For now. But we all know the internet is forever but Morrison also knows what the River Card is going to be. That card is AFP involvement and that will be that. Next.

  26. This plausible deniability is a great tool in a politician’s armory isn’t it? And someone like Morrison is just the man to make the most of it.

  27. Zoomster
    History has produced thousands of women leaders but the idea pushed by some people that women will automatically act in a supportive way doesn’t holed up. Julia Gillard wrote about this in her leadership book.

  28. “ Acting judges are normally appointed so as to get around the rule that judges must retire at 70. Seventy is a bit arbitrary as many at this age are still in possession of their marbles.”

    The statutory age of judicial senility in NSW has recently been bumped up from 72 to 75 for permanent appointments and 78 for Acting Judges.

    The over reliance on Acting Judges seems to have a number of different reasons. For some Acting Judges the ‘powers that be’ in government (whether that is the head of jurisdiction, or the AG of some factotum) like them sufficiently to keep using them, but they cant quite seem to jag a permanent commission for one reason or another. Acting District Court Judge Andrews (formerly a judge in PNG) comes to mind. For a decade or more he seemed to be effectively glued to the bench, but could never obtain an appointment (and the pension that ultimately went with it). There doesn’t seem to be many of those left. Thank goodness, as it was really fairly cruel treatment of a hard working servant.

    Other acting judges have done their 10 years or more full time service but simply don’t want the stress of working full time anymore. Some of these acting judges are still quite young, and you’ll often find them doing a stint or two of circuit work.

    Some Acting judges are actually full time magistrates. There has been occasions when members of the bar have been appointed as acting judges so that both parties can see whether they are suited to a permanent appointment – as I understand it, this is quite common in the UK – and the acting judge is called a Reader (I think).

    Some acting judges should have simply stayed retired as soon as they could draw a pension. Preferably even sooner.

  29. Andrew_Earlwood

    Tuesday, February 16, 2021 at 10:18 pm

    [‘The statutory age of judicial senility in NSW has recently been bumped up to 75 for permanent appointments and 78 for Acting Judges.’]

    I wasn’t unaware of that. But of course, the ’77 referendum didn’t apply to state judges. The states can do what they like re. retirement age of judges.

  30. Greensborough Growler:

    Tuesday, February 16, 2021 at 10:21 pm

    [‘Show em your Dan Murphy’s card. That’ll learn them.’]

    I never leave home without it.

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