Newspoll: 51-49 to Coalition

Primary vote movement from Newspoll in favour of the Coalition and against Labor, as the government sneaks back into the lead on the two-party headline.

Courtesy of The Australian, the latest Newspoll finds the Coalition sneaking back into a two-party lead of 51-49, after a 50-50 result three weeks ago. The primary votes are Coalition 43% (up two), Labor 34% (down two), Greens 12% (up one) and One Nation 3% (steady). Scott Morrison’s personal ratings are little changed, up one on approval to 65% and down one on disapproval to 31%, while Anthony Albanese is respectively down four to 39% and down one to 40%, and Morrison’s lead as preferred prime minister is out from 58-29 to 59-27.

The poll was conducted Wednesday to Saturday from a larger-than-usual sample of 2068, which suggests we will be seeing state breakdowns in the coming days showing leadership and COVID-19 performance ratings for the state governments and Premiers.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

520 comments on “Newspoll: 51-49 to Coalition”

  1. The Act should be changed so there are 13 Justices on the Supreme Court (the current number of lower court circuits – each of which has a Supreme Court Justice assigned to it already, with a couple of Justices getting multiple circuits.) They also should have a fixed term that they’re forced to retire after – just to keep things cycling and prevent the appointment of young hard ideologues who stay on the court for decades.

  2. The Trumpistas are like the mad Liberals that come on this show. They simply cannot wait their turn to speak. Plus, they interrupt and disrupt the answers of others. There appears to be a desperation to let nothing go unchallenged, immediately and rudely if necessary.

  3. Rational Leftist @ #503 Monday, September 21st, 2020 – 10:24 pm

    The Act should be changed so there are 13 Justices on the Supreme Court (the current number of lower court circuits – each of which has a Supreme Court Justice assigned to it already, with a couple of Justices getting multiple circuits.) They also should have a fixed term that they’re forced to retire after – just to keep things cycling and prevent the appointment of young hard ideologues who stay on the court for decades.

    The enforced retirement at 70 has certainly helped Australia’s High Court not become sclerotic.

  4. C@tmomma @ #505 Monday, September 21st, 2020 – 10:31 pm

    Rational Leftist @ #503 Monday, September 21st, 2020 – 10:24 pm

    The Act should be changed so there are 13 Justices on the Supreme Court (the current number of lower court circuits – each of which has a Supreme Court Justice assigned to it already, with a couple of Justices getting multiple circuits.) They also should have a fixed term that they’re forced to retire after – just to keep things cycling and prevent the appointment of young hard ideologues who stay on the court for decades.

    The enforced retirement at 70 has certainly helped Australia’s High Court not become sclerotic.

    If there was a 70 yr limit of commenatary on PB, the whole day would be open to WB for real estate development of his cyber space.

  5. This Ruddick first says Trump appears to change his mind because he’s a showman, then he says he’s “authentic”, then that he says what he means, and that what he means is whatever he says it means, until he says something different.

    Mad Hatter’s effing Tea Party.

  6. Why stop at 13 justices? They could go to at least 17. They should impose mandatory retirement at 65 or 66 and limit the term of service to 7 or 8 years.

  7. Why stop at 13 justices?

    If you read my post, you would see why.

    The problem with just arbitrarily increasing the number for no reason is it becomes a bottle that can’t be recorked. My rationale at least covers that.

    Although, let’s be honest: If it’s sudden, it would still be perceived as packing and be countered at the next opportunity by the other side.

  8. Tha false dichotomy debate continues….
    Actively encouraged by our callous PM
    Here is the first paragraph of a well argued article by Bill Mitchell
    There is no inevitable trade-off between saving the lives of the aged and economic prosperity

    Many issues that become ‘hot topics’ in public debates are really non-questions despite the heat they raise. All sorts of experts advance views, television current affairs programs trawl over them with various of these experts making careers for themselves, politicians take up hours of their time and our time discussing them, yet, when you really break the issue down – there is nothing much to see. The seemingly very erudite debates, discussions, opinions are all based on false starting premises, which are assumed and rarely discussed. This sort of charade is all the legacy of living in the fictional world created by (the economics) profession, which has distorted public discourse so badly that we now have people saying old people should be allowed to die terrible deaths from COVID so the young people can have jobs. These are old people who worked all their lives to help build our nations, who fought in World Wars to defend our freedom from daunting enemies, old people who cared for us personally, and old people who mostly, probably, have the joy of life before them each day they open their eyes, just like any of us. The problem is that the whole construction is based on a false premise: being that there has to be widespread economic damage if we choose to protect the health of our peoples. That premise is based on the failure to understand that the currency-issuing government can attenuate any economic losses if it chooses to adopt appropriate economic policy interventions. The fact that real GDP and employment has fallen significantly this year is testament to a failure to use fiscal capacity. We should be better informed before we get into elaborate but flawed debates that essentially come down to turning one population cohort against another.

    http://bilbo.economicoutlook.net/blog/?p=45927&utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+economicoutlook%2FFYvo+%28billy+blog%29

  9. And if Bill Mitchell’s article isn’t enough to bother you with the callousness of Gladys and Scotty, then this one by John Birmingham about QAnon probably will.
    Remember, a friend of Scotty’s wife is a QAnon believer. You can tell a lot about a person by the company they keep.

    To QAnon believers, Donald Trump is not the world’s most dangerous fucking moron armed with the US nuclear codes and no discernible impulse control. He is a stone cold special operator, working with a crack team of military commanders to defeat The Cabal, a human trafficking ring of super elites and Hollywood celebrities.

    It would be pretty fucking funny, if it wasn’t a good chance to kill us all.

    Drew Linzer
    @DrewLinzer
    We polled belief in the #QAnon conspiracy theory.

    Fully 33% of Republicans say it is mostly true. 23% think some parts are true. Only 13% say it’s not true at all.

    In contrast, 72% of Democrats say the QAnon theory isn’t true.

    Only 14% of Americans have never heard of QAnon.
    September 2nd 2020

    https://aliensideboob.substack.com/p/qanon-the-origins-of-an-alternate

  10. The destruction of a once functioning State.

    “Neo-liberalism”, or whatever you like to call the pretend ideological cover for greed and pillage that is destroying the anglophone States, is at the heart of the disaster that is Tory England’s Covid response.

    In May, Boris Johnson said: “We …… will have a test, track and trace operation that will be world-beating and yes, it will be in place by June 1.”

    Since then, around £10 billion has been spent on England’s track and trace system, which is run by private companies outsourcing giant Serco and call centre company Sitel. The companies were initially contracted to run the system up to August 23.

    Their contracts were extended, potentially up to the value of £528 million and for an undisclosed period.

    On June 18 it was announced that the contact-tracing app which the UK Government had been developing would be entirely scrapped due to functional issues. Its replacement has still not yet been rolled out nationally.

    The coronavirus testing system is run by Deloitte, which handles Lighthouse Labs, has also seen huge issues. In recent weeks people have been sent hundreds of miles and sometimes across oceans to access a test.

    A new Survation poll of 1003 people aged over 18 and living in the UK. The fieldwork was conducted between September 15 and 16, 2020, showed:

    14% wanted the track, tracing and testing system run by the private sector (profiteers), while
    74% wanted it publicly run

    https://www.thenational.scot/news/18737146.coronavirus-74-percent-brits-say-westminster-managing-response-wrongly/

  11. Greensborough Growler @ #506 Monday, September 21st, 2020 – 10:36 pm

    C@tmomma @ #505 Monday, September 21st, 2020 – 10:31 pm

    Rational Leftist @ #503 Monday, September 21st, 2020 – 10:24 pm

    The Act should be changed so there are 13 Justices on the Supreme Court (the current number of lower court circuits – each of which has a Supreme Court Justice assigned to it already, with a couple of Justices getting multiple circuits.) They also should have a fixed term that they’re forced to retire after – just to keep things cycling and prevent the appointment of young hard ideologues who stay on the court for decades.

    The enforced retirement at 70 has certainly helped Australia’s High Court not become sclerotic.

    If there was a 70 yr limit of commenatary on PB, the whole day would be open to WB for real estate development of his cyber space.

    I’d still be here though. 😀

  12. What’s the ‘net satisfied’ line on Newspoll about?

    They take the total satisfied and deduct the unsatisfied and that results in a ‘net satisfied’ figure???

    If 67% are satisfied, 67% are satisfied.


  13. Lars Von Trier says:
    Monday, September 21, 2020 at 8:43 pm

    frednk says:
    Monday, September 21, 2020 at 8:41 pm
    Lars Von Trier
    And which religious group do you belong to?
    __________________________
    Since your curious – I declared as Jedi in the last census.

    Good choice, but you won’t go far in the modern Liberal party.

  14. “ Why stop at 13 justices? They could go to at least 17. They should impose mandatory retirement at 65 or 66 and limit the term of service to 7 or 8 years.”

    In my view the Democrats should go to 15 justices but then entrench an amendment to the Constitution to preclude the number expanding again, so as to avoid a Republican counter stack. Perhaps also entrench the mechanisms for the fair selection of justices going forward.

    If you have an age limitation, then a term of service limitation is probably redundant. And vice versa.

    I agree with Michael Kirby – there should be 10 year, non renewable terms. Appointees should be subject to extensive medical testing to ensure that they are unlikely to go gaga during that 10 years.

    Any associate justice may be eligible for another 10 year term only IF they are appointed as the Chief Justice. Otherwise, it should be 10 years and you are out.

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