Same-sex marriage survey: 61.6 yes, 38.4 no

And the winner is …

So there you have it. Below is a tool for exploring the results at divisional level according to a range of electoral and demographic criteria. Take your pick from the drop down menu, and you will get divisional “yes” votes recorded on the vertical axis, and their results for the relevant indicator on the vertical axis. Most of these are self-explanatory, with the exception of “One Nation support index”. This equals the division’s 2016 Senate vote for One Nation divided by the party’s overall Senate vote in that state, multiplied by 100. So an electorate will score 100 if its One Nation vote is exactly equal to the state average; it will score 200 if it’s double; 50 if it’s half; and so forth. This is to prevent the party’s across-the-board high results in Queensland from spoiling the effect. “Finished school” is measured as a percent of the 15-plus population.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,326 comments on “Same-sex marriage survey: 61.6 yes, 38.4 no”

  1. What we need now is Dennis SHanahan to trawl through the numbers and find a number that proves 61 percent is a loss for the Yes campaign.

    I feel kinda chuffed at this result. it seems my fellow Australians aren’t as bad as I sometimes think they are.

  2. ReachTEL‏ @ReachTEL
    4m4 minutes ago
    So “advanced data analysis” of Twitter data appears to be utterly useless and Australian pollsters nail it again. #ssm

  3. Melbourne and Sydney had the highest results for Yes – 83.7%.

    Are we are going the way of the US. .. 2 islands of rational normality in a sea of intollerants ?

  4. @Confessions….Glad to be proven right on twitter data.,said when it came out it was bollocks. How close were the polling companies to the correct result.?

  5. Barney:

    I know the ABS always has difficulties accessing remote indigenous communities for census counts. I’m assuming that is what is occurring with this vote.

  6. So only 17 MPs can claim a mandate to vote NO when the legislation hits the parliament. It will be interesting to see how many of the 133 will be willing to buck the decision of their constituents.

  7. Looking at the electorate results, the culturally diverse seats in Sydney voted no, some by big margins. Proud to say that my electorate of Newcastle had the fourth highest result in NSW, at 74%. Only Sydney, Wentworth, and Grayndler, in that order, had higher results. Earrings (lol!) had the fifth highest result at 70%.

  8. Speech by the guy who couldn’t bring himself to campaign for the ‘Yes’ vote on SSM, trying to take credit and put the boot into Labor for simply wanting parliament to do it’s job!

  9. Looks like it was conservative migrant groups that voted ‘no’ most strongly. Which would explain why Ireland, which is far less multicultural, voted ‘yes’ more strongly than here.

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