Essential Research 2PP+: Labor 53, Coalition 41 (open thread)

Little change from Essential, a narrowing from Morgan, budget polling from Resolve Strategic, and strong support for the Indigenous Voice from YouGov.

The voting intention numbers from the latest fortnightly Essential Research survey, which include a 5% undecided component (up one), have Labor down one to 33%, the Coalition steady on 31%, the Greens steady on 14% and One Nation down one to 5%. The pollster’s 2PP+ measure has Labor up a point to 53%, the Coalition down two to 41% and undecided up one to 5% (the missing point being down to rounding).

The Essential Research report also features the pollster’s monthly “leaders favourability ratings”, which invite respondents to rate Anthony Albanese and Peter Dutton on scales from one to ten, as distinct from its separate and more conventional measure of approval and disapproval. After a seven point drop for Albanese in the previous survey for “positive” ratings (seven to ten), this survey has him up a point to 41%, while negative ratings (zero to three) are down four to 24% after a six point increase last time, and neutral (four to six) are up two to 30%. Peter Dutton is down three on positive to 23% and up two on negative to 35%, with neutral up a point to 34%.

A monthly question on national direction finds “right direction” sneaking back into the lead over “wrong track” after falling behind last time, being respectively up three to 41% and down four to 39%. Other findings from the poll include 48% support for raising the rate of JobSeeker with 29% opposed, and 52% support for allowing New Zealanders who meet character tests to become Australian citizens after four years of residency with 22% opposed.

Ahead of the budget, the poll finds 41% approving of Jim Chalmers’ performance as Treasurer with disapproval at 27%, although a forced response question on whether respondents were able to name him as Treasurer came down 67-33 against. Respondents were asked if they felt current spending in seven policy areas was too high or too low, which found health and Medicare leading the field by some distance on 56% for too low. Despite recent awareness-raising exercises on various fronts, only 18% felt national security and defence spending was too low while 26% felt it was too high, the latter being the biggest out of the seven.

Respondents were also asked if various categories of tax rate were too low or too high: only “taxes for international corporations” scored a plurality for too low, with super, property and income taxes all scoring a shade below 50% for too high. The poll was conducted Wednesday to Sunday from a sample of 1130.

Further recent polling:

• The most recent Resolve Strategic poll had 43% support for raising JobSeeker with 31% opposed; 34% support for cancelling or scaling back stage three tax cuts with 23 opposed; 60% support for increasing the corporate tax rate, with 13% opposed; 58% support for increasing the tax on resource company profits, with 12% opposed; and pluralities in favour of reducing concessions on negative gearing, capital gains, superannuation and franking credits. The poll was conducted Wednesday to Sunday before last from a sample of 1609.

• This week’s Roy Morgan voting intention results have Labor’s two-party lead narrowing to 53.5-46.5, which is apparently in from 56.5-43.5 (though it was 56-44 when I checked a week ago), from primary votes of Labor 36%, Coalition 35.5% and Greens 13% (my record of last week’s results shows Labor at 37%, Coalition 33% and Greens 12%). The poll was conducted last Monday to Sunday – as usual, nothing is offered on sample size, survey method of preference method (Kevin Bonham calculates that Labor is a point higher on two-party based on 2022 election flows).

• The Age/Herald reported on Monday that a YouGov poll for the pro-Voice Uluru Dialogue group, which encompassed a vast national sample of 15,060, had 51% in favour of an Indigenous Voice and 34% opposed, with yes leading 52-32 in New South Wales, 53-31 in Victoria, 47-40 in Queensland, 48-37 in Western Australia, 51-34 in South Australia, 50-35 in Tasmania, 64-24 in the Australian Capital Territory and 52-32 in the Northern Territory. Respondents were specifically asked how they would vote if the referendum to be held “on a proposal to establish a Voice to Parliament for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in the Constitution” were held today. This turns out to be the poll cited by Rebecca Huntley of The Guardian last week which found support among Indigenous people at 83%, from a substantial sub-sample of 732. However, the poll was conducted well over a month ago, from March 1 to 21.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,485 thoughts on “Essential Research 2PP+: Labor 53, Coalition 41 (open thread)”

  1. “… the pollster’s monthly “leaders favourability ratings” … invite respondents to rate Anthony Albanese and Peter Dutton on scales from one to ten …”

    From *zero* to ten, according to Essential’s site.

  2. “The pollster’s 2PP+ measure has Labor up a point to 53%, the Coalition down two to 41% and undecided up one to 5% (the missing point being down to rounding).”

    So, divvying up the undecideds would deliver a 2PP approaching 56 – 44, consistent with last week’s Newspoll.

  3. An early good morning. This ABC story is on reaction to the RBS decision.
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-05-03/rba-interest-rate-hike-cost-of-living/102293424

    I am in the camp of those who think the RBA got this badly wrong. Warning previously you might make a particular decision does not mean it is correct when you make it. Correctness depends on the evidence.

    Looking at headline inflation is deceptive – we should be checking underlying core inflation. The March quarter inflation data had already peaked. Retail trade, lending and household spending data has yet to be released. So how do the RBA know they are still going up? They don’t. They went with a predetermined decision. Poor.
    https://www.abs.gov.au/release-calendar/future-releases

  4. A bleary good morning. This article highlights some valid criticisms of the RBA board decision on interest rates.
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-05-03/rba-interest-rate-hike-cost-of-living/102293424

    The RBA had warned it might do this. But pre-warning does not make a decision correct. Correctness depends on the evidence. Most of the critical data on the economy (spending, lending and retail trade) is yet to be released. The RBA can’t know it. So this decision looks predetermined. It might cause economic harm.
    https://www.abs.gov.au/release-calendar/future-releases

    The purpose of interest rate policy is to avoid recession. Controlling inflation is a means to that end. If the RBA cause a recession while trying to control inflation they have lost sight of their purpose.

    (Sorry I thought I lost my first post and wrote another. I will leave both up. Tired.)

  5. Talk about tone deaf:

    In a sign of just how tense Joyce’s relationship with unions has become, he took a parting shot.

    “The thing that makes Qantas special is its people, and there’s a difference between our people and the unions, sometimes people forget that our people are highly engaged,” Joyce said.

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2023/may/03/can-vanessa-hudson-win-back-the-flying-public-when-she-takes-the-qantas-controls-from-alan-joyce

    Who does he think makes up a union? Unicorns! Good riddance.

  6. #weatheronPB
    One distant pink cloud
    And a worn-out stubborn star.
    That’s all for now.

    EDIT: I can’t type this early in the morning. 🙂

  7. Although anything can happen and often does, I would think the biggest danger Labor faces is a minority government, with the crossbench consisting of the Greens and indies.

    The Liberals are not going to become any more electable in the short term and the media doesn’t seem in the mood to spruik them in the way they did Abbott.

    So, if there is a drop off in Labor’s vote – not apparent in any polling at present – the beneficiaries are more likely to be Teals and/or Greens.

  8. Why are these voices to parliament acceptable and Indigenous voices to parliament are not? At least the Indigenous voices to parliament won’t be nameless or faceless, unlike these people.

    Federal authorities are being asked to reveal the names of the politicians who give lobbyists full access to Parliament House after growing frustration over hundreds of people who can wield influence in the building without disclosure.

    A crossbench alliance is pushing for new rules to reveal the people who have gained unfettered access to the building’s private corridors with sponsored bright orange passes signed by federal politicians under a system that keeps their identities secret.

    But the push is raising concerns over privacy and security because the sponsored passes include family members and other people who are not engaged in lobbying, which means parliamentary authorities are likely to reject the blanket release of all the names.

    One politician has approved 55 of the special passes but cannot be identified, according to new details uncovered by a question from independent Senator David Pocock to the officials who supervise the security passes for politicians, staff, the media and visitors.

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/orange-is-the-new-hack-891-more-lobbyists-gain-inside-access-to-parliament-house-20230502-p5d4so.html

  9. WTF?! Given this is happening why on earth is there such a fuss and carry on about the Indigenous voice to parliament?

    A key concern among crossbenchers is that lobbyists and others can walk unannounced into the offices of all ministers, backbenchers and independents at any time because they have full access to the building around the clock.

  10. The NAB and AMP have both increased their probabilities of Australia slipping into a recession from 40 per cent to 45 per cent, with AMP saying a “consumer recession” — which, to many Australians, will feel like a recession, even if one is not technically reached — is now “inevitable”.

    Both chief economists Alan Oster and Shane Oliver said a technical recession — two consecutive quarters of negative economic growth — could be achieved with another interest rate increase.

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-05-03/rba-interest-rate-hike-cost-of-living/102293424

    What advice is the RBA board relying on for their decisions? You wouldn’t know as no information is forthcoming about the decision making justification.

    Chalmers’s reform of the RBA board structure can’t come soon enough.

  11. Cat

    “ Maybe Phillip Lowe is trying to wreck the joint on the way out?”

    I don’t know but maybe the board are? Of the nine member RBA board we have two members from the Centre for Independent Studies, two directors of CSL, and one from the Menzies Institute. No members from an organised labour, environmental or social welfare background. In short, Josh stacked the board with corporate suits and Liberal leaners.

  12. Agreed Zoomster that any dissatisfaction with Labor is not likely to benefit the LNP in 2PP terms. The LNP willingly cast aside it’s inner city small-l clique at the last election and nothing their doing at the moment suggests they are going to win those seats back (looks more likely they’ll lose more urban seats) or be sufficiently appealing to win additional suburban and regional seats to counter this.

    The LNP’s current hoped for electoral base is no more than one-third of the electorate and shrinking. They need to do something to modernise/restructure the party and make it somewhat appealing again to a majority of people. This is further complicated by Labor’s shift to the centre which is pushing the LNP off the couch and the fact that the remaining moderate MP’s who could spark a revival seem to be only a dying vestige of the Liberals.

    Still a long way out to the next election but I can’t see the LNP increasing beyond it’s current seat count unless they change their tune which would require a change of leader and direction at a minimum, but where is this internal push for change going to come from? At this stage anything from a minority Labor to landslide majority Labor government seems the range of possible outcomes.

  13. The fake outrage and concern for Jobseekers by the corrupt lib/nats and their propaganda media units, will again be exposed after next week budget .
    If Labor increases Jobseeker and other so called welfare payments for some or to all those on Jobseeker by a reasonable amount

    The same lib/nats and their propaganda media units hacks , will go out on full attack against Labor and those who are on Jobseeker and and other so called welfare payments , and will cry the predictable propaganda what about the poor big businesses who cant find workers , the government should forced those Jobseekers, pensioners to work for less than minimal pay

  14. Awkward.

    Disease detectives at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are probing a new outbreak: the roughly three-dozen covid cases linked to their own annual conference last week.

    “CDC is working with the Georgia Department of Health to conduct a rapid epidemiological assessment of confirmed COVID-19 cases that appear to be connected to the 2023 EIS Conference to determine transmission patterns,” CDC spokesperson Kristen Nordlund wrote in an email to The Washington Post.

    Nordlund said CDC reported the cases to state health officials who have authority over the location where the conference occurred. Attendees said that many people at the gathering did not mask, socially distance or take other precautions that CDC had recommended earlier in the pandemic.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2023/05/02/covid-outbreak-cdc-annual-conference/

  15. Socrates @ #13 Wednesday, May 3rd, 2023 – 6:49 am

    Cat

    “ Maybe Phillip Lowe is trying to wreck the joint on the way out?”

    I don’t know but maybe the board are? Of the nine member RBA board we have two members from the Centre for Independent Studies, two directors of CSL, and one from the Menzies Institute. No members from an organised labour, environmental or social welfare background. In short, Josh stacked the board with corporate suits and Liberal leaners.

    Correct. And I’m sure there’s nothing they’d like more than plunging the nation into a Recession so as to give their political wing a leg up. Which sounds cynical and conspiracy theory-leaning, however, I’m old enough to remember how the Capital Class have conspired in the past to bring down successful Labor governments.

    I mean, it’s obvious with his appearance yesterday to try and put a spanner in the works of the Voice, that Tony Abbott is still around, trying to cause mischief, and Peter Dutton is one of his closest confidants and vice versa, and, as Patricia Karvelas said to Peter Fitzsimons when he interviewed her and asked her to use 3 words to describe Peter Dutton she said: ‘Personable. Unflappable. Determined’. So I can presume that he would leave no stone unturned to try and upend the Albanese government, and neither would his brothers-in-arms in places such as the Reserve Bank Board. And I include Phillip Lowe in that number because that insight about how hard-nosed he can be behind the benign facade just leads me to think that there’s more to him than meets the eye. Besides, would a Coalition government appoint a Reserve Bank Governor who didn’t see eye to eye with them philosophically? I mean, Scott Morrison, when Treasurer, appointed him.

    Am I being suitably sceptical or too conspiracy-minded? Hard to say definitively.

  16. its hard to see how hudson will be any diferent to joice she has been a senyor egzecutive for a long time and worked there for all her life

  17. This is a bit self congratulatory but I don’t think it is undeserved. Guardian Australia is ten years old. It started with Catherine Viner, Lenore Taylor and less than 20 staff. It now has 167 staff and over 7 million readers.
    https://www.theguardian.com/media/2023/may/02/guardian-australia-launched-in-a-spirit-of-hope-and-determination-ten-years-later-were-going-from-strength-to-strength

    Personally I have been a financial supporter for some years. I don’t agree with every story but Australian media is not balanced if it only consists of right wing private media and a centrist ABC. The Guardian has also been at the forefront of employing a new generation in journalists and not preserving those of fossilised thought. That matters for the future when newsrooms are shrinking.

  18. I’m not a Nick Cave fan, a bit to emo for me but after this reply to folk who are questioning his acceptance of a coronation invite, I like the bloke…
    “ Dear Jon, Adrian, Roger and Matt,

    I’ll make this a quick one because I’ve got to work out what I am going to wear to the Coronation.

    I am not a monarchist, nor am I a royalist, nor am I an ardent republican for that matter; what I am also not is so spectacularly incurious about the world and the way it works, so ideologically captured, so damn grouchy, as to refuse an invitation to what will more than likely be the most important historical event in the UK of our age. Not just the most important, but the strangest, the weirdest.

    I once met the late Queen at an event at Buckingham Palace for ‘Aspirational Australians living in the UK’ (or something like that). It was a mostly awkward affair, but the Queen herself, dressed in a salmon coloured twin-set, seemed almost extraterrestrial and was the most charismatic woman I have ever met. Maybe it was the lighting, but she actually glowed. As I told my mother – who was the same age as the Queen and, like the Queen, died in her nineties – about that day, her old eyes filled with tears. When I watched the Queen’s funeral on the television last year I found, to my bafflement, that I was weeping myself as the coffin was stripped of the crown, orb and sceptre and lowered through the floor of St. George’s Chapel. I guess what I am trying to say is that, beyond the interminable but necessary debates about the abolition of the monarchy, I hold an inexplicable emotional attachment to the Royals – the strangeness of them, the deeply eccentric nature of the whole affair that so perfectly reflects the unique weirdness of Britain itself. I’m just drawn to that kind of thing – the bizarre, the uncanny, the stupefyingly spectacular, the awe-inspiring.

    And as for what the young Nick Cave would have thought – well, the young Nick Cave was, in all due respect to the young Nick Cave, young, and like many young people, mostly demented, so I’m a little cautious around using him as a benchmark for what I should or should not do. He was cute though, I’ll give him that. Deranged, but cute.

    So, with all that in mind, I am looking forward to going the Coronation. I think I’ll wear a suit.

    Love, Nick”

  19. I’ve been a financial supporter of The Guardian from the get-go as well, Soc. Anything to counter Murdoch’s malign influence needs to be supported in Australia. I may not agree with the perspective of The Guardian all the time but I do, more often than not. And who cares what I think anyway!?! 😆

  20. And it begins….

    Sawyer Hackett@SawyerHackett
    ·
    1h
    Holy shit. The Texas Senate just passed a bill to give Greg Abbott’s handpicked Sec. of State the power to overturn elections in the 3rd biggest county in the U.S.

    Republicans weaponizing 2020 election lies to rig elections. This is a HUGE story.

  21. C@tmommasays:
    Wednesday, May 3, 2023 at 7:07 am
    Am I being suitably sceptical or too conspiracy-minded? Hard to say definitively.
    _____________________
    You and Scott would make a good pair.

  22. Another Guardian contributor here, can recommend to all. And unlike the competition, you can choose your own amount and contribution cycle.

  23. Prepare for the outrage machine to get going again – Anthony Albanese has announced he will publicly swear an oath of loyalty to King Charles III.
    Republicans will have a pink fit.

    And, if Phillip Lowe is trying to sabotage the economy out of pure spite, Chalmers should sack him on the spot.

  24. So one of Albo’s favourite AFL memories was watching Leigh Matthews play in the 1989 Grand Final.
    Even though Leigh retired in 1985.

  25. Dog’s Brunch @ Wednesday, May 3, 2023 at 7:21 am

    Well I happen to like Nick Cave. He has a way with words. That said, I am not convinced of his appreciation of history. The Coronation is hardly the most historical event in the UK of our age. For example, Brexit would matter more to more people, by affecting their daily lives in more profound ways. The Tory party made sure everyone in the UK received an invite 😉

  26. Good morning Dawn Patrollers

    Shane Wright reckons the RBA is playing ‘recession roulette’ as it steps up the inflation fight.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/rba-plays-recession-roulette-as-it-steps-up-inflation-fight-20230502-p5d4sx.html
    Karen Maley explains why the RBA now sees inflation as a more formidable foe.
    https://www.afr.com/companies/financial-services/why-rba-now-sees-inflation-as-a-more-formidable-foe-20230502-p5d4w7
    Struggling households are being promised a substantial cost-of-living relief package in next week’s federal budget after a shock decision by the Reserve Bank to drive official interest rates to an 11-year high with a threat to go even further. Jim Chalmers, warning against assumptions about the government’s spending plans, admitted on Tuesday the RBA’s decision to take the official cash rate to 3.85 per cent had cast a pall over the May 9 budget.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/pretty-brutal-chalmers-promises-relief-in-budget-after-shock-rate-rise-20230502-p5d4sv.html
    The RBA’s surprise interest rate hike caught out seasoned pundits and borrowers alike, writes Peter Hannam.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/may/02/rba-surprise-interest-rate-hike-catches-out-seasoned-pundits-and-borrowers-alike
    Starving the unemployed shames us all – and Ross Gittins has had a gutful. He says he wouldn’t want to be Treasurer Jim Chalmers, as he puts the finish touches to next week’s budget. Everywhere he looks he sees problems – problems that need solving by spending more taxpayers’ money.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/starving-the-unemployed-shames-us-all-and-i-ve-had-a-gutful-20230502-p5d4t2.html
    Peter Martin discussing the calls for increases to Jobseeker says, “Chalmers set up a committee he couldn’t ignore. So why is he now so keen to talk about everything but its number one recommendation?”
    https://theconversation.com/presented-with-a-jobseeker-finding-too-clear-to-ignore-he-changed-the-subject-how-jim-chalmers-is-shaping-the-budget-204754
    Labor MPs who have advocated for an increase in the jobseeker base rate were mostly unimpressed by the prospect of their government limiting the raise to those aged over 55 in the upcoming federal budget. Paul Karp and Amy Remeikis write that concerns are also growing that any changes to commonwealth rental assistance will also fall along generational divides and be lower than what is needed to meet the rising cost of housing, with a 25% increase firming as the likely figure, when advocates had called for 50%.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2023/may/02/labor-mps-condemn-discriminatory-plan-to-increase-jobseeker-only-for-those-over-55-in-budget
    Jim who? Chalmers may not have Keating’s cut-through but this budget is his chance to serenade Australia, opines Peter Lewis.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/commentisfree/2023/may/02/jim-who-chalmers-may-not-have-keatings-cut-through-but-this-budget-is-his-chance-to-serenade-australia
    Mustafa Ruchwani reports that renters in Australian capital cities have suffered the highest increase for a 12-month period since records began in 2007 as the nation’s housing crisis shows no sign of slowing down. The combined capitals’ rental rate increased 11.7% over the past year, far above the average increase of 3.5%.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2023/may/03/rent-in-australian-capital-cities-climbs-record-117-in-12-months
    Some crossbenchers are so frustrated with visits from lobbyists with orange all-access passes that they lock their doors. David Pocock wants to know who is signing them up, writes David Crowe. What Crowe describes is a system that is as loose as a goose.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/orange-is-the-new-hack-891-more-lobbyists-gain-inside-access-to-parliament-house-20230502-p5d4so.html
    Integrity experts are saying Scott Morrison’s reported links to an AUKAS-related job in the UK defence industry show the pressing need for reforms to guard against the revolving door between government and industry, reports Christopher Knaus.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2023/may/02/scott-morrisons-reported-links-to-uk-defence-job-shows-lobbying-reforms-needed-integrity-experts-say
    The global revolution in economics, trade and technology being advanced by the Biden administration to combat the rise of China has been given deeper expression by senior administration officials in the most definitive outline of their path-breaking US strategy. The liberal globalised world of the past 40 years in which Australia grew, prospered and, with a touch of modesty, even mastered to our enduring benefit, will exist no more. It is dying on the funeral pyre of intensifying US-China rivalry, writes Paul Kelly.
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/commentary/historic-pivot-in-us-strategy-signals-new-danger-era/news-story/23285c38421558ce5ba61c803244fe38?amp
    Labor MPs have called for their own government to review billions of dollars in grants aimed at areas worst hit by COVID lockdowns, amid concern about funding disparities that meant some local councils received almost 15 times more than their neighbours on a per capita basis. The $5 billion WestInvest fund was set up by the former Coalition government to help pay for “transformational” infrastructure projects in 15 local government areas across western Sydney, part of a suite of pandemic recovery spending measures funded from the sale of the WestConnex motorway.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/nsw/labor-mps-call-for-review-of-inequitable-western-sydney-grants-program-20230502-p5d4zf.html
    New Medicare reforms won’t fix everything, but they start to tackle the system’s biggest problems, say Peter Breadon and Lachlan Fox.
    https://theconversation.com/new-medicare-reforms-wont-fix-everything-but-they-start-to-tackle-the-systems-biggest-problems-204800
    Paul Bongiorno reckons King Charles’ coronation is a last hurrah for Australian monarchy.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/politics/2023/05/02/coronation-king-charles-australian-monarchy/
    The AFR reveals that previously secret emails show PwC charged $2.5 million in fees to advise 14 clients how to sidestep new tax avoidance laws in 2016, relying on confidential information.
    https://www.afr.com/companies/financial-services/for-your-eyes-only-how-pwc-leaks-helped-global-clients-dodge-tax-20230501-p5d4rf
    Pressure is growing on the NSW government to halt plans for the Powerhouse Museum at Ultimo, effectively sending the proposal back to the drawing board.
    https://www.smh.com.au/culture/art-and-design/second-report-casts-doubt-on-powerhouse-demolition-plans-20230420-p5d23v.html
    A judge has ordered lawyers involved in two of Bruce Lehrmann’s defamation cases to provide any submissions on the possibility of a jury trial by the end of the week. Justice Michael Lee made the order in the Federal Court yesterday, when he listed the former Liberal Party staffer’s lawsuits against Network Ten and the publisher of news.com.au for a trial starting in November.
    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/8180507/judge-sets-date-for-lehrmann-defamation-trial-as-jury-considered/?cs=14329
    The vaping industry preyed on young Australians with a flood of dangerous products. Change was much needed, explains Becky Freeman.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/may/02/the-vaping-industry-preyed-on-young-australians-with-a-flood-of-dangerous-products-change-was-much-needed
    Abul Rizvi writes that one of the many appalling consequences of establishing the Department of Home Affairs and transfer of immigration compliance functions to Australian Border Force was an extraordinary cut back in immigration compliance activity. He warns that the Albanese Government will need to increase immigration compliance activity significantly if its migration strategy is to be effective.
    https://johnmenadue.com/will-labor-restore-immigration-compliance-activity/
    It’s crucial for press freedom that whistleblowers are protected, not punished, write Kieran Pender, Peter Greste and Bill Browne who say that the Albanese government has talked the talk on press freedom but its failure to intervene in two ongoing cases undermines its commitment to reform.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/it-s-crucial-for-press-freedom-that-whistleblowers-are-protected-not-punished-20230502-p5d4yw.html
    The SMH editorial says that as Joyce takes flight, it’s time for Qantas to put on a new, softer face.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/as-joyce-takes-flight-time-for-qantas-to-put-on-a-new-softer-face-20230502-p5d4uo.html
    And Elizabeth Knight simply says that the new Qantas CEO must fix the rift with Qantas’s customers.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/new-qantas-ceo-must-fix-the-rift-with-the-customers-20230502-p5d4ux.html
    Retiring Qantas chief Alan Joyce ran down the airline during his 15 year tenure; his depletion of the fleet and brutal cost cutting sapped customer service and staff morale. Michael Sainsbury reports on the changing of the guard and whether the inevitable corporate makeover may consign low-cost carrier Jetstar to aviation history.
    https://michaelwest.com.au/alan-joyce-to-depart-is-it-time-for-qantas-to-retire-jetstar-too/
    According to Josh Gordon, the attorney general, Mark Dreyfus, has accused the Liberal party of flirting with “the far-right fringe” of the referendum debate after the shadow minister, Michaelia Cash, appeared on a Sky News program where the host drew comparisons between the Indigenous voice and apartheid.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2023/may/02/liberals-accused-of-flirting-with-far-right-fringe-after-sky-news-show-where-indigenous-voice-compared-to-apartheid
    On this subject, the AIMN’s Grumpy Geezer writes, “A waft of V05 and humbug hung in the air when the tinnitus in a trouser suit that is Michaelia Cash was handed the drivel shtick for the Tories’ latest FUD campaign – their vilification du jour being the Indigenous Voice to Parliament.”
    https://theaimn.com/submarines-and-parking-tickets-and-high-farce-in-the-no-campaign/
    The AFR tells us that the Australian Securities and Investments Commission will be streamlined under a major shake-up, amid an exodus of executives and search by the Albanese government for new commissioners. The restructure, which is partly a response to a report by the Financial Regulator Assessment Authority, was announced by the ASIC chairman Joe Longo at a town hall meeting with staff held in Sydney but broadcast to ASIC’s other offices yesterday.
    https://www.afr.com/policy/economy/asic-muscles-up-its-enforcement-division-as-part-of-a-major-shake-up-20230502-p5d4v0
    David Estcourt reports that Victoria’s police watchdog has found that some officers continue to engage in predatory behaviour towards vulnerable members of the public despite internal efforts to detect and subdue the problem, and that the conduct remains under-reported.
    https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/watchdog-finds-predatory-behaviour-persists-among-victoria-police-officers-20230502-p5d4xx.html
    At a recent Shanghai auto expo, the world’s largest battery maker unveiled a battery it claimed could power electric aircraft or propel electric vehicles beyond 1,000 kilometres on a single charge. Chinese Amperex Technology Limited (CATL), which makes one third of the world’s EV batteries, shared few details about the technology, but said it would start mass production later this year.
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2023-05-03/catl-announces-battery-to-make-electric-aviation-possible/102289310
    Ukraine is set to strike back, writes Mick Ryan who looks at what success might look like.
    https://www.smh.com.au/world/europe/ukraine-set-to-strike-back-but-what-would-success-look-like-20230502-p5d4ub.html
    Most of us don’t care about the coronation and attempts to whip up our support have already backfired, writes Gaby Hinsliff who says it was the call to swear an oath of allegiance to the king that did it for her.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/may/02/king-charles-apathy-coronation

    Cartoon Corner

    David Rowe

    David Pope

    Matt Golding





    Andrew Dyson

    Cathy Wilcox

    Simon Letch


    Spooner

    From the US













  27. Taylormade says:
    Wednesday, May 3, 2023 at 7:32 am
    So one of Albo’s favourite AFL memories is watching Leigh Matthews play in the 1989 Grand Final.
    Even though Leigh retired in 1985.

    —————————————-
    LOL Taylormade

    Matt/Matthew Guy , blaming the lib/nats propaganda media units for not being able to win government in 2018 and 2022

  28. Griff, point taken but an event like this that is so off the charts with regard to irrelevance might be something I would go to too if I could afford it, 🙂

  29. Dog’s Brunch @ Wednesday, May 3, 2023 at 7:37 am
    “Griff, point taken but an event like this that is so off the charts with regard to irrelevance might be something I would go to too if I could afford it, ”

    Agreed. It would be like being immersed in a Shakespearian play.


  30. zoomstersays:
    Wednesday, May 3, 2023 at 6:50 am
    ‘Men use sexist and homophobic jokes due to insecurity over their masculinity, study claims..’

    Could have told you that for free.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/men-sexist-homophobic-jokes-masculinity-insecure-anti-gay-study-gender-roles-western-carolina-university-a7694591.html

    So as per this study Latham has “insecurity over their masculinity”.

    And a lot of Liberal politicians like Abbott, Morrison, Joyce as well, who opposed SSM plebiscite against their electorate wishes. I am not sure about Dutton because he was architect of the plebiscite. However, he sat in stunned silence when the legislation was passed in Parliament whereas everyone else were celebrating about its success.(can Sprocket or someone else produce the photo of the scene?)

    And last but not the least are MAGAs.

  31. Q: Matt/Matthew Guy , blaming the lib/nats propaganda media units for not being able to win government in 2018 and 2022

    As I read it, he blamed the ring wing media, the left wing media, the MSM, the ABC, the Victorian Lib President, leaking Lib Members, the Feds….basically everyone but himself!

  32. I told youse Albo would swear allegiance weeks ago to his liege lord King Charles III.

    Now public confirmation.

  33. ‘Griff says:
    Wednesday, May 3, 2023 at 7:32 am

    Dog’s Brunch @ Wednesday, May 3, 2023 at 7:21 am

    Well I happen to like Nick Cave. He has a way with words. That said, I am not convinced of his appreciation of history. The Coronation is hardly the most historical event in the UK of our age. For example, Brexit would matter more to more people, by affecting their daily lives in more profound ways. The Tory party made sure everyone in the UK received an invite ‘
    ——————————–
    Cave is not all that bright. Brexit is easily more important than Chuckie’s coronation. The former cost and is costing Britain hundreds of billions. The coronation only costs a hundred million.

  34. Nic cave is wrong if he thinks the coronation is one of the most important historical events of the age. Important for who? It’s just a show. A facade.

    The rest of what he says seems ok and I don’t care if he goes or not.

  35. The Federal Reserve in the USA and the EU Central Bank both deliver interest rate settings decisions later this week

    They also will give reasons for their respective decisions

    And the reasons will be exclusively the continuing presence of inflation at rates which are above target and which remain entrenched (whilst slowly moderating)

    Australia is no different

    What is not mentioned by contributors to this site and certain contributors to media is the dangers of entrenched inflation

    IF inflation is entrenched at 7% that sees home mortgage interest rates at 10% or more after allowing for the cost of money

    How does that sit given the highly leveraged housing market in Australia (a factor since the 2000-2010 period by RBA data)?

    With Howard as treasurer we had a “grandfathered” interest rate of 13.5%, new borrowers 17.5%

    And double digit unemployment – matching double digit inflation

    Do you want those recessionary times again?

    The Nation was crippled back in those times, including banks collapsing (there were 7 “free enterprise” banks by advertising plus the CBA plus the State banks, remember?)

    These facts plus the government of the day freezing salary and wages increases saw a change of government

    And all in a regulated economy

    The upcoming Budget must and will be calibrated to not add inflationary pressures

    The unemployed rate is where it is at – with employers unable to access staff

    In the hue and cry about income support, this fact is not mentioned (noting the trend not the figure per Se is the measure)

  36. Air Albo enjoying London in the nice weather.

    Curious place for a PM to be a week out from a crucial budget.

  37. Asked whether he would swear allegiance, Albanese replied he “will do what is entirely appropriate as the representative of Australia” promising to “engage in that spirit” by swearing the oath – as he has done 10 times when sworn in to parliament and as a minister.


  38. The global revolution in economics, trade and technology being advanced by the Biden administration to combat the rise of China has been given deeper expression by senior administration officials in the most definitive outline of their path-breaking US strategy. The liberal globalised world of the past 40 years in which Australia grew, prospered and, with a touch of modesty, even mastered to our enduring benefit, will exist no more. It is dying on the funeral pyre of intensifying US-China rivalry, writes Paul Kelly.
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/commentary/historic-pivot-in-us-strategy-signals-new-danger-era/news-story/23285c38421558ce5ba61c803244fe38?amp

    WTF! But isn’t it true that a war between US and China is what Murdoch press want? Nevermind.

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