Newspoll: 54-46 to Labor

A nudge in the wrong direction for the Coalition in the latest Newspoll.

The Australian reports the latest Newspoll has Labor leading 54-46, out from 53-47 three weeks ago, from primary votes of Coalition 35% (down two), Labor 38% (up one), Greens 11% (steady) and One Nation 3% (up one). Scott Morrison is down two on approval to 46% and up one on disapproval to 50%, while Anthony Albanese is steady on approval at 37% and down one on disapproval to 46%. Morrison leads 48-34 as preferred prime minister, out marginally from 47-34. More to follow.

UPDATE: The poll also finds 35% saying Anthony Albanese and Labor would be better at “leading Australia’s response to the global climate change crisis”, 28% favouring Scott Morrison and the Coalition, and 21% saying both would be equal. It also find a continuation of a significant shift on what the federal government should prioritise out of energy prices, carbon emissions and preventing blackouts, which has now been asked four times going back to 2017. From July 2018 to February 2020 to the present, the response for carbon emissions has escalated from 24% to 43% to 47%, while energy prices has declined from 63% to 42% to 40%. Preventing blackouts has been steady, going from 9% to 11% to 10%. I am not able to access a sample size of the poll because I can’t get The Australian’s online printed edition to work, but the poll will have been conducted from Wednesday to Saturday.

UPDATE 2: The sample was 1515 – the methodology statement for the poll can be viewed here.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,121 comments on “Newspoll: 54-46 to Labor”

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  1. Polling we were told was neck and neck in Victoria in 2018

    So “cliffhanger” was the banner headline in both papers on Election Day

    58/42 to Labor

    And a landslide, the Libs losing blue ribbon seats and nearly losing another to a teenage candidate with a $1,500- budget

    Which my Liberal Party contacts said would be the result

  2. PoliNight – I am being deliberately conservative in my predictions for Labor gains, in part because elections nearly always end up being closer than some bigger polling suggests (which is why Rudd didn’t win in 2007 with a 58-42 margin, or anything like it). No one really expects the final election result to be 54-46, a result Labor has only ever come close to in 1943 & 1983. Furthermore, there actually isn’t that much low-hanging fruit in terms of Tory marginals for Labor to pick up, and so a swing in the realms of, say, 3% on 2019 (which would give us a 2PP of around 52-48) wouldn’t actually gain that many seats. I always remain hopeful of a bigger win, but I’ve been a Souths-supporting Labor voter for over 40 years, so I’ve probably internalised a degree of defensive pessimism!

  3. I don’t rule out the PM going for the September option. It would certainly be uncharted waters. Last half senate election was in 1970.

  4. Polling we were told was neck and neck in Victoria in 2018

    So “cliffhanger” was the banner headline in both papers on Election Day

    58/42 to Labor

    Voters have more confidence voting for Labor state then federal though. Labor has always been viewed the natural party of state government as they are more trusted on issues of health and education by voters which are viewed as state issues. While the Liberals are viewed as the natural party of government federally because they are more trusted on issues of immigration and economic management by voters which are viewed as federal issues. Whether that should be the case is a whole another debate….

  5. Honestly – we can make all the usual predictions about never putting anything past Morrison.

    The September option is one I can’t fathom being acceptable to any hard heads. Two elections in a year? Especially when its pure cravenness cannot be missed or ignored.


  6. WB:

    Scott Morrison is down two on approval to 46% and up one on disapproval to 50%, while Anthony Albanese is steady on approval at 37% and down one on disapproval to 46%. Morrison leads 48-34 as preferred prime minister, out marginally from 47-34.

    From a article from ‘The Conversation” in May 2019:
    Leadership is not the only factor that matters in elections, but it is important. According to AES data, in eight of the last 11 elections, the party with the most popular leader won. The exceptions are the elections won by John Howard in 1998 and 2001, and Paul Keating’s win in the 1993 “unlosable” election.

    The Australian Election Study has been tracking leader evaluations based on surveys of voters since 1987, providing a good indication of what it takes, at the minimum, for a leader to win an election. The AES has found that generally around 10% of voters cast their ballots based on party leaders.

    This can fluctuate depending on leader popularity. When a very popular Rudd was Labor leader in 2007, 20% of Labor voters cast their ballots based on the leader. In contrast, in the 2016 election when Shorten was leader, just 6% of Labor voters did so.

  7. I think Morrison will get his new Jedi-turned-Sith apprentice, Count Dooku to lead an independence movement and then Morrison will use the ensuing civil war as a pretence to give himself special emergency powers, which he will use to stay in power well after his term has expired and, ultimately, to restructure the country into an Empire of which he will crown himself Emperor.

    I wouldn’t put anything past him.

  8. I don’t rule out the PM going for the September option. It would certainly be uncharted waters. Last half senate election was in 1970.

    This was considered before the last federal election despite Scott Morrison denying it. This is the Liberals where clinging to power at any cost is there political ideology……

    “Australian voters would cast their ballots in two federal elections in a single year under a drastic option being canvassed within the Morrison government to gain more time to restore community support and defeat Labor.

    While a May election remains the most likely scenario in the government discussions, some MPs are open to the idea of holding a Senate election early in the year while going to a separate election for the House of Representatives several months later.

    Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s office rejected the two-election scenario on Tuesday morning, saying the election was due next year and adding: “The government has no plans for a dual election.”

    Special Minister of State Alex Hawke issued the same message soon afterwards. “The government has no plans for a dual election. The election is due next year, as required,” he tweeted.

    The option was canvassed because it would give the government more scope to deliver a federal budget early in the year to rebuild its stocks after a slump in the opinion polls over the two months since the Liberal Party’s brutal coup to remove Malcolm Turnbull as prime minister.”

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/drastic-dual-election-plan-considered-as-government-tries-to-regain-ground-20181105-p50e5k.html

  9. Morrison is unpopular with the public anecdotally and statistically. He is unpopular on a world stage (not just glasgow but with our largest trading partner China, with Europe (esp France), and even the president of our main security partner the USA hasn’t learned his name).

    He does not control the senate and his grip on the lower house is so tenuous, he hasn’t put forward any substantial legislation in 18 months and on occasion has been forced into doing the exact opposite of what he said he would do (see the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide).

    He has no policy platform to speak of — a loose commitment to net zero by 2050 long after he is gone is just the latest announceable.

    Custodians of civic culture and parliamentary standards are on the record declaring the Morrison government as notably corrupt and lacking in standards. Most of his ministers have trashed their own reputations, from sportsrorts to forged documents.

    Additionally there have been several cases of workplace bullying and sexual assault that have not only not been dealt with, but have been actively obfuscated and covered up.

    The budget is a shambles, probably the worst set of numbers in history.

    This is a government and a Prime Minister clearly in crisis.

  10. The only reason to have two elections next year would be to give the government more time to hand out taxpayers’ money to their mates, before being annihilated by an unimpressed electorate.

  11. Speaking of mug punters, the centre, the swinging voter, the undecideds, etc., who will decide the next election, I think they will be focussed on Morrison. Last election people looked hard at Shorten, who ironically was the only stable leader on offer, and decided to give Morrison a “proper go”. But that strategy won’t work for Morrison this time. He’s had a go, to quote the man, and has shown us someone who runs away from problems, sometimes literally, or who tries to talk his way out of them. This time Morrison is under the spotlight. We “punters” know an election is coming. The last couple of years haven’t been that great. Morrison’s position is fundamentally weak.

    As an aside, I spotted this image recently, possibly yesterday, ABC.net.au.
    https://i.postimg.cc/x8t923Tr/Morrison2021-10-23.jpg

  12. At one time this poll result would have made me happy, but after the last election I am not confident to predict anything.

  13. Polling of sorts in the AFR, via UK firm Bastion – pandemic attitudes focussed.

    https://static.ffx.io/images/$width_620/t_resize_width%2Cq_88%2Cf_auto/88d903cb6535b2368e87b956ee479acaab9b04d9#image.jpg

    ‘The research shows optimism and life satisfaction have rebounded significantly as lockdowns end. Australians’ life satisfaction increased five percentage points to 66 per cent.

    Victoria is showing the greatest rebound, up 11 percentage points to 59 per cent, while 63 per cent of Victorians are feeling optimistic, up a massive 19 percentage points from September.

    “It is great to see Victorian’s optimism and life satisfaction bounce back

    as lockdown lifts, but at the same time it is also not surprising that many Victorians may struggle with the reopening, as the research shows [their] anxiety has hit an all-time high,” Ms Gardiner said.
    “Almost one in two Victorians have felt anxious in the last week, well above the one-in-three peak we have seen at times through the pandemic.

    “Reopening anxiety is a real thing, and having spent 262 days in lockdown in total, it is going to take more for Victorians to adjust, and it’s important for people to know that it is normal to have these conflicting thoughts about reopening.”

    The research also shows that Australians are divided over the politics of the pandemic.
    Positive perceptions of the Morrison government’s response (38 per cent) now slightly outweigh negative perceptions (35 per cent), but the positive perceptions are lowest in Victoria (33 per cent) and NSW (40 per cent).

    People in NSW, Victoria and Queensland are also divided on the ability of state governments to balance the reopening of state borders with the reopening of the economy.

    Western Australians and South Australians are overwhelmingly supportive of the way their state governments have responded to the pandemic.

    https://www.afr.com/policy/economy/reopening-anxiety-shell-shocked-victorians-signal-slow-recovery-20211022-p592ei

  14. “Political Nightwatchmansays:
    Sunday, October 24, 2021 at 11:32 pm
    …..Voters have more confidence voting for Labor state then federal though.”

    Yes, I must admit that there is a trend there that seems objective. But this time around ScuMo made a fatal mistake, he dragged NSW (the “Gold Standard” state, remember?) down to the Federal battle for power, trying to use the Covid pandemic as a springboard to win the next election. But, as it often happens with ScuMo, his strategy backfired: Berejiklian’s approach to the third wave of Covid in NSW (deluded, weak, slow, obsessed with keeping the economy open) was a complete disaster, and even after some strange activities of organised groups started a rise of infections in the ALP-led Victoria, the pandemic comparison between the two states still favours Victoria during this third wave, that initiated around the 14th of June, not to speak of the magnificent result of the other large ALP-led state that has most of its population packed in the SE corner of the country, Queensland:
    State:…………………………………………………NSW…………..VIC……………QLD
    N. of Third Wave Covid cases………….68,778……….59,247………363
    N. of Deaths……………………………………..498……………218…………….0

    Covid looks like is going to act as the “great equalizer” this time around: the equalizer between state and federal voting patterns within each state. So, perhaps the Coalition may do well in SA and Tasmania, but they will suffer losses in Qld, WA, even the “Gold Standard” NSW and perhaps even in Victoria. Newspoll may not reflect the exact final 2PP, but ScuMo won’t be able to repeat the 2019 “miracle”, as both Palmer and PHON will be unable to gather enough support from voters who are disaffected with the “duopoly”, and then direct those voters to preference their local Coalition party above the ALP… The pandemic has told all those disaffected voters that Libs and Labs are NOT the same, and that the Labs care for the People first and through the People they care for the economy, whereas the Libs focus on the economic interests of their mates…. and stuff the People.

  15. Hugoaugogo says:
    Sunday, October 24, 2021 at 10:26 pm
    I guess this finally puts to bed any thought of an election this year. The government is clearly behind, with now several Newspolls giving Labor a significant lead, and the margin if anything is getting larger. We shouldn’t, of course, put too much stock in a single poll, but it’s now been three or four months since the government has been anywhere near competitive in the 2PP, though the primaries haven’t moved that much, with the Coalition somewhere in the 35-38 range, the ALP something similar, and the Greens pulling their standard 10%. There’s still time for the Libs to recover, but the window is starting to close on them. They will be wanting to see some sort of movement toward them in the new year, otherwise we’re looking at another May election.

    It will interesting to see the next Newspoll state break-down. Presumably Labor will be picking up 2-3 seats in WA, maybe another 1-2 in both Victoria and Queensland, with another in Tassie. That’s about a net 7 seats for the good guys, which would be (just) enough for the ALP to form government, but all eyes will be on NSW, where Morrison seems to think that he has a chance of snatching a few Labor marginals and hold on to minority government. My best guess is that the government is struggling as much in the premier state as anywhere else, and is as likely to lose seats in NSW as gain any, and I’m yet to see much in the way of recent polling which suggests that NSW will be some sort of hold out.

    I think, as things stand right now, that Labor is on track to win at least ten seats nationwide, and with it a narrow but perfectly decent working majority.
    ===================
    I’d love to see it happen, but I think that ten seats may be a bit too optimistic. Margin was increased in quite a few Coalition seats in 2019, and as you said, a 54-46 election result is extremely unlikely and there are not that many very low margin Coalition seats.

    I think you’re right about Victoria, but a second gain, beyond Chisholm, may be difficult imo. I don’t know which seats can be gained in Queensland, even Longman may be difficult unless there’s a serious swing in Qld. I think that Tassie may go against the trend (the Gutwein effect) and I doubt Labor will be picking up Bass or Braddon. I’m also worried about Lyons, the Libs imploded there in 2019 and I think they would have won it otherwise. In NSW, I think Gilmore and Eden-Monaro may be a problem (and I think Repacholi in Hunter may prove to be a very poor selection) and I’m struggling to see highly likely Labor gains.

    So my optimistic scenario is Labor holding all their NSW seats and Lyons (or gaining something in NSW if any are lost there), gaining Chisholm and Longman, and then it comes down to WA. 3 seats may get Labor a minority government, 5-6 (extremely optimistic imo), a majority. I’d love to see serious swings to Labor in Qld and NSW but I think there’s not enough evidence of that as yet. I think a Labor minority government is still the more likely outcome.

    I’d rather not go into my pessimistic scenario…

  16. “sprocket_says:
    Monday, October 25, 2021 at 6:15 am
    Polling of sorts in the AFR, via UK firm Bastion – pandemic attitudes focussed.”…

    Interesting set of data, sprocket, many thanks….. It looks like ScuMo wanted to ride to victory on the back of Covid…. but he fell and Covid crashed all over him…. his Pfizer vaccination is unlikely to save him politically.

  17. It also find a continuation of a significant shift on what the federal government should prioritise out of energy prices, carbon emissions and preventing blackouts, which has now been asked four times going back to 2017. From July 2018 to February 2020 to the present, the response for carbon emissions has escalated from 24% to 43% to 47%, while energy prices has declined from 63% to 42% to 40%

    That’s very interesting. Coalition lackeys in the media always try to make this about electricity prices, and we can’t do anything about climate change lest it increase energy costs. Nice to see voter opinion shifting on this.

  18. Dutton – or anyone else – will move on Morrison if he has enough support. Being PM for even a few months beats basically any other consideration.

    Because the media is lazy, they don’t bother to talk to back benchers much,, which is why recent leadership changes have seemingly come out of the blue (although the tea leaves were there to be read).

    Consistent polls like this – and it’s been fairly consistent for months now – combined with the indie movement must be making any Lib in a marginal seat very nervous, and I doubt the problems with the Nats are helping convince them that Morrison has what it takes.

    I also don’t talk to backbenchers, so I won’t make any confident assertions, but it wouldn’t surprise me if Morrison isn’t the PM at the next election (particularly as there’s likely to be a few bad Newspolls between now and the election).

  19. Confessions says:
    Monday, October 25, 2021 at 6:51 am

    That’s very interesting. Coalition lackeys in the media always try to make this about electricity prices
    —————————–

    The same Pro coalition media hacks also continue to ignore that Australians were promised to be $500 better off each year after the repeal of the carbon price

    That promise was never ever true

  20. Ven says:
    Sunday, October 24, 2021 at 11:53 pm

    Scott Morrison is down two on approval to 46% and up one on disapproval to 50%, while Anthony Albanese is steady on approval at 37% and down one on disapproval to 46%. Morrison leads 48-34 as preferred prime minister, out marginally from 47-34.
    ———-
    The Australian Election Study has been tracking leader evaluations based on surveys of voters since 1987, providing a good indication of what it takes, at the minimum, for a leader to win an election.

    This can fluctuate depending on leader popularity. When a very popular Rudd was Labor leader in 2007, 20% of Labor voters cast their ballots based on the leader. In contrast, in the 2016 election when Shorten was leader, just 6% of Labor voters did so.
    ——————
    People are relatively familiar with Albo so leadership popularity should already be baked into the voting intention numbers. However campaigns always highlight the leader so hopefully the campaign trail is something that will energise Albo.

    I am still really dumbstruck that Sfm only has a netsat of – 4 and that 46% of the electorate gives him a favourable rating. Who are these people? Looked at from the other side, I’d think Sfm and co wouldn’t be too devastated by those approval numbers. Voting intention is the real deal though and these numbers would be starting to cause alarm I’d think.

  21. “Andrew Goldsays:
    Monday, October 25, 2021 at 6:41 am”

    William’s Bludger Track currently predicts a 5.5% swing to the ALP, but even if it’s just 4% that would mean 9 new seats for the ALP and a majority of 77 (assuming that they don’t lose any seat). This is according to the post-2019 federal election pendulum.

    Oh, and here in Queensland, when we get serious, we can really swing…. just ask Campbell Newman.

    ScuMo wanted to ride to victory on the back of Covid, but the virus had very different ideas… Unfortunately Murdoch doesn’t have the power to brainwash a virus, which ScuMo should have known.

  22. “John Ceesays:
    Sunday, October 24, 2021 at 9:55 pm
    Time for old mate Peter from Brisbane to step up and knock this net zero nonsense off the agenda once and for all.”

    Peter is holding his seat of Dickson with a 54.6% 2PP…. which is not fully safe given the swinging patterns of Queenslanders… I am not sure what he’s going to do, but he should be definitely worried.

  23. Good morning Dawn Patrollers

    Simon Benson summarises the Newspoll saying that popular support for the Liberal-Nationals falling two points to 35 per cent, the lowest level of support recorded this term.
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/politics/newspoll-support-slumps-as-scott-morrison-leaves-for-glasgow/news-story/ebc8d809824deda8446ad7066d8f3a47
    An obviously upset Ross Gittins says that with Morrison’s tricky deal, the Nationals have been rewarded for agreeing to harm the regions.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/morrison-s-tricky-deal-nationals-rewarded-for-agreeing-to-harm-the-regions-20211024-p592lw.html
    The Coalition has avoided a meltdown over the emissions target, but at what price, asks Katherine Murphy.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/oct/24/coalition-avoids-meltdown-over-emissions-target-but-at-what-price
    Jennifer Hewett writes that Morrison has sealed a climate deal, but he doesn’t satisfy his critics.
    https://www.afr.com/companies/energy/with-friends-like-the-nsw-liberals-20211024-p592ox
    It says everything about Barnaby Joyce and the Nationals that the Deputy Prime Minister would not say whether he personally backed the defining stance on climate change policy his party room accepted last night, says David Crowe.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/net-zero-pledge-a-defining-moment-but-the-real-test-is-action-20211024-p592pu.html
    Sarah Martin tells us that while details of the package are yet to be made public, it is understood it includes a new regional future fund and an extra cabinet position that is expected to go to the resources minister, Keith Pitt, who was dumped after Joyce became leader.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/oct/24/nationals-agree-to-net-zero-target-by-2050-despite-barnaby-joyces-opposition
    Net zero for carbon emissions in 2050 is meaningless without an ambitious target to halve these emissions in the next decade. In a two-part article, Michael Keating sets out why we need a more dramatic target such as 50% reduction by 2030.
    https://johnmenadue.com/why-we-should-halve-carbon-emissions-by-2030/
    The Nationals finally agree to a 2050 net-zero target, but the real decisions on Australia’s emissions are happening elsewhere, explains John Quiggin.
    https://theconversation.com/the-nationals-finally-agree-to-a-2050-net-zero-target-but-the-real-decisions-on-australias-emissions-are-happening-elsewhere-170451
    Global security and stability could break down, with migration crises and food shortages bringing conflict and chaos, if countries fail to tackle greenhouse gas emissions, the UN’s top climate official has warned ahead of the Cop26 climate summit.
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/oct/24/world-conflict-and-chaos-could-be-the-result-of-a-summit-failure
    Alan Kohler explains how the whaling industry shows us the future for coal.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/finance/finance-news/2021/10/25/coal-whaling-alan-kohler/
    Sean Kelly writes, “Albanese says he’s in the final quarter, so when is he going to start kicking goals?”
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/albanese-says-he-s-in-the-final-quarter-so-when-is-he-going-to-start-kicking-goals-20211023-p592j9.html
    Shane Wright tells us that it may be the most important inflation report in a decade – and the finances of millions of Australian mortgage holders rest on what it reveals and how the Reserve Bank reacts. He says this week’s September quarter consumer price index will get closer than usual analysis due to concerns prices are being pushed up much more quickly than expected, forcing the RBA into the ultimate monetary policy reverse ferret.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/inflation-data-could-reshape-household-finances-20211022-p592dp.html
    Dan Andrews has taken the gloves off and announced that unvaccinated adults and older children will be barred from accessing all but basic services until 2023 under the Victorian government’s path back to freedom.
    https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/most-of-victoria-s-covid-rules-will-end-in-november-with-one-key-exception-20211024-p592og.html
    Rebekha Sharkie will propose new legislation to federal parliament today to cap the amount of money aged care providers can charge under the guise of “administration” costs. She says a lot of rorting is going on.
    https://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/stop-the-exploitation-rebekha-sharkie-takes-on-the-aged-care-sharks-with-new-bill-to-regulate-hidden-fees-for-inhome-services/news-story/e05487aa616e08125bc55cbb9cc3af5c
    Professor Nicole Guran argues that to address affordability, we need to reboot the public sector involvement in housing delivery which amounted to over 10 per cent of new homes in the mid 1990s. We need Commonwealth and state governments to support non-profit and community housing schemes as well as shred equity models for aspiring first home buyers. She says we need to stop talking supply slogans and start talking genuine housing solutions.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/it-s-a-myth-that-increasing-supply-will-fix-sydney-s-soaring-house-prices-20211021-p591ua.html
    Several members of the tribunal that reviews government decisions were paid in years they did not work, documents reveal as the tribunal comes under renewed scrutiny from federal Parliament, reports Katina Curtis.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/government-tribunal-paid-some-members-in-years-they-did-no-work-20211024-p592le.html
    Adele Ferguson reckons we should be watching 4 Corners tonight as it and the SMAge expose a lot of problems with this cosmetic surgery baron.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/consumer-affairs/wild-west-without-the-sheriffs-cosmetic-clinics-accused-of-botched-surgeries-breaches-20211024-p592od.html
    It’s a good thing engineers didn’t have the professional standards of some of today’s accountants when the Sydney Harbour Bridge went up, or we might be driving straight into the water. Michael West examines the ethical cloud over a local arm of one of the Big Four accounting firms, with some technical advice from accountant Jeffrey Knapp.
    https://www.michaelwest.com.au/bad-apples-or-bad-orchard-kpmg-australia-fails-ethics-test/
    The founder of a Melbourne wellness company that planned to expand into China with the help of former Liberal trade minister Andrew Robb has had his home repossessed after the business collapsed.
    https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/wellness-company-boss-home-repossessed-as-creditors-circle-20211024-p592o3.html

    Cartoon Corner

    David Rowe
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FCckX2VVgAkZpTC.jpg
    Alan Moir
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FCbBDX5UYAU6OU8.jpg
    Peter Broelman
    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/images/transform/v1/crop/frm/tPntrWhUbGLyDWYCTv46rt/90b496a4-6362-4569-8919-822b67d8235d.jpg/r31_0_2331_1533_w600_h400_fmax.jpg
    Matt Golding
    https://static.ffx.io/images/$width_840/t_resize_width/q_86%2Cf_auto/07603101ab073e0a0c65b2311a58a5404d86ba1d.jpg
    Megan Herbert – first time seen
    https://static.ffx.io/images/$width_840/t_resize_width/q_86%2Cf_auto/55713afde888607d763864da8db5b7361350d25d.jpg
    Warren Brown
    https://content.api.news/v3/images/bin/08882dd5ad0d443068073a1f80e6988a.jpg
    Glen Le Lievre
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/FCaeM_vVkAIHL97.jpg
    Mark Knight
    https://content.api.news/v3/images/bin/3540c09f3909f04cbb454b97a7b8329b?width=1024#image.jpg
    Leak
    https://content.api.news/v3/images/bin/786110a74e5afd1b0a4f1f803f5efbe0?width=1024#image.jpg

    From the US

    https://mediacloud.theweek.com/image/upload/f_auto,t_single-media-image-desktop@1/v1634916875/lk102421dAPR.jpg
    https://mediacloud.theweek.com/image/upload/f_auto,t_single-media-image-desktop@1/v1634916795/20211021edptc-a.jpg
    https://image.cagle.com/256493/750/256493.png

  24. “Steve777says:
    Sunday, October 24, 2021 at 10:25 pm
    The Federal Government’s lowest level of support in 3 years. That takes us back to the months following Turnbull’s ouster. The Government recovered with the help of Palmer and the mainstream media. ”

    It was Palmer and Hanson, especially in Queensland. But I am confident that the ALP learned the lesson and have moderated their progressive program, so that it doesn’t scare the swingers. Palmer and PHON are unlikely to do as well at the coming Federal election as they did in 2019, hence they are unlikely to be as crucial as they were through their second preferences sent to the Coalition….

  25. Leak’s and Mark Knight’s cartoons, courtesy of BK:

    Yep, the Liberals are scared to death that this move by Daniel Andrews of reopening, in spite of large numbers of positives, will piss on all the Liberal narratives. In fact, not even that Guy in the Victorian opposition knows what to do now….

    In the meantime, is Perrottet’s “Gold Standard” coming, and then going the way of the former Berejiklian’s “Gold Standard”?…. Oh dear, the Libs will need more than a bunch of cartoonists to reset the “narrative”!

  26. I do hope you were all able to catch Littleproud’s performance on News Breakfast this morning. It was worthy of an Oscar for boasting, prevarication, and plain old lies.

  27. We keep seeing statements that the Nationals have agreed to a target of net zero emissions by 2050, but there is no detail publicly available and apparently no intermediate target. Then we have Barnaby waffling on about an something like an agreement to have a process to maybe move to zero by 2050…

    That’s not a plan. It’s not even an intention. They’re certainly not fooling the world with that. With the help of media allies, they’re hoping to fool enough punters.

  28. Good morning all. Thank you BK. Not a cloud in the sky and another sunny day on the way.

    I like 54/46.

    But I am a bit cautious about what is happening inside the 13%, UAP-wise.

  29. How many NSW residents regularly check their check-in app history to see if they’ve been in a venue with a known Covid case? I do and have discovered that last week I was in a venue that an infectious person had visited. Advice is to monitor for symptoms and only get tested if I am unwell.

    I wonder how many other people are scrolling through their history to see whether they’re at risk? I’d bet not many.

  30. More traffic around on weekend which is not a surprise but I though the driving was generally pretty crap particularly when I scratched the car at Ikea, Rhodes.

  31. Confessions,

    Apparently the Service NSW app will now text you if you have been in a venue at the same time as a Covid positive person.

    This extra feature came in a few weeks ago.

    This prevents you having to scroll through your history.

  32. Alpo says:
    Monday, October 25, 2021 at 7:26 am
    Yep, the Liberals are scared to death that this move by Daniel Andrews of reopening, in spite of large numbers of positives, will piss on all the Liberal narratives. In fact, not even that Guy in the Victorian opposition knows what to do now….
    ———————-
    Don’t worry: if the likely rise in Vic COVID case numbers looks scary (or possibly even if it doesn’t) the Liberals and the Hun will turn on a dime, running a new narrative about the recklessness and irresponsibility of the roadmap.

    Guy is lying low at the moment. The shit show in the Lib party room about the RWNJ agenda to water down the bans on gay “conversion” abuse, and the apparent leaking of the audio by the disgruntled O’Brien faction, means Guy would prefer not to face the media.

  33. Someone should remind Morrison while he is in Glasgow, what leadership did he show during the Bushfires, he went to Hawaii for a holiday.

  34. A record day in the UK

    325,000 booster shots given

    Meanwhile, in Australia we talk cohorts (once again)

    The cohort being the most vulnerable among us

    Mind you, the timing to booster shots being injected as they are across the UK serves to highlight that the UK were vaccinating whilst Australia were still seeking a vaccine due to the botched procurement and roll out by “our” Federal government

    I wonder if the Pentecostal with the glass jaw will receive a booster shot whilst in the UK?

  35. The UAP vote is only going to favour LNP in QLD which has been the strongest Lib/nats with W.A , QLD isn’t going to matter if nationwide is swinging against the Lib/nats

  36. Been There @ #94 Monday, October 25th, 2021 – 7:57 am

    Confessions,

    Apparently the Service NSW app will now text you if you have been in a venue at the same time as a Covid positive person.

    This extra feature came in a few weeks ago.

    This prevents you having to scroll through your history.

    Really? I didn’t receive a text. I wonder if that means they don’t regard me as a close enough contact?

  37. LTGEN Frewen:

    Booster doses for the immunocompromised have started and that’s just to bring the people up to the same level of protection that rest of us achieve through just two doses.

    But we’re waiting on Atagis’s advice now around boosters.

    We expect that the advice is imminent and we think what’s going to happen is that a booster shot will be made available from six months, from your second dose.

    So we’ll work the priority groups in the very first instance, aged care, disability, front-line health workers and those sorts of areas.

    But we think what will happen is that as people become eligible from six months, they’ll just be able to go and grab a booster shot.

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