Newspoll: 52-48 to Labor

Labor slightly widens the lead it opened in the previous Newspoll, and Anthony Albanese maintains his ascendancy as preferred prime minister despite a slight fall in his personal ratings.

The Australian reports the latest Newspoll has Labor’s two-party lead widening from 51-49 to 52-48 since the previous poll three weeks ago. Both major parties are down on the primary vote, the Coalition by two to 38% and Labor by one to 35%, while the Greens are up one to 13% (equalling their best result since 2011) and One Nation is steady at 4%. Scott Morrison’s personal ratings are unchanged after the hit he suffered in the previous poll, at 37% approval and 59% disapproval, while a spike in Anthony Albanese’s ratings last time has failed to completely stick, with his approval down three to 43% and disapproval up three to 40% (compared with 40% and 41% in the poll before). However, Albanese maintains the lead on preferred prime minister he opened up in the last poll, which is out slightly from 43-39 to 43-38. The poll was conducted Wednesday to Sunday from a sample of 1510.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

831 comments on “Newspoll: 52-48 to Labor”

  1. Jim Molan is currently driving the train off the tracks on Q&A…

    “I’m not relying on evidence” he says triumphantly, referring to his climate denialism. You don’t say!

  2. BW

    Nah. What happened is that excuses for denialism were used and called out.

    Good to see a scientist calling the ignorant fool out.

    More needed. Not this pretense there are two sides of a debate.

  3. Confessions @ #802 Monday, February 3rd, 2020 – 10:13 pm

    Sharri Markson@SharriMarkson
    Nats doing the numbers tonight claim Barnaby will scrape through as leader with 11 votes to McCormack’s 10. Still 11 hours to go though! #NatSpill

    What a joke this government is, if that comes to pass.

    Astrobleme @ #825 Monday, February 3rd, 2020 – 10:36 pm

    C@t
    I’m watching the SA livestream. It’s near the start.
    Look on iView for the South Australia live stream

    Thank you. 🙂

  4. C@tmomma @ #784 Monday, February 3rd, 2020 – 10:18 pm

    Itza,
    Do you have any idea what the NSW government is doing about the native animals that have had their habitat destroyed by the bushfires? You said the Rural Assistance lady offered help with feed for stock, but what about the native animals?

    That wasn’t raised C@t, as best I recall. I’m pretty sure it was all stock related. Maybe if I’d asked about native animals, she would have had something to say. I was impressed that they were on the front foot, unlike the Feds.

    On the day we got back in – the road was closed for three days, then power restored – there was a bedraggled magpie hanging close, and a small goanna wandering around. The kookaburras were calling a lot a odd times of day. Things are slowly getting back towards normal animal wise; lots more birds, the wombats, and the magpie with a mate.

  5. Cud Chewer @ #799 Monday, February 3rd, 2020 – 9:15 pm

    https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6

    Is there any evidence from this that the rate of infection has slowed down?

    Not yet. The ‘Feb 3’ datapoint is still pending/incomplete. The previous two datapoints show ~3k new confirmed cases per day.

    Pretend ‘Feb 3’ isn’t there until about midday tomorrow to get a better read of the graph.

  6. ItzaDream @ #832 Monday, February 3rd, 2020 – 10:46 pm

    C@tmomma @ #784 Monday, February 3rd, 2020 – 10:18 pm

    Itza,
    Do you have any idea what the NSW government is doing about the native animals that have had their habitat destroyed by the bushfires? You said the Rural Assistance lady offered help with feed for stock, but what about the native animals?

    That wasn’t raised C@t, as best I recall. I’m pretty sure it was all stock related. Maybe if I’d asked about native animals, she would have had something to say. I was impressed that they were on the front foot, unlike the Feds.

    On the day we got back in – the road was closed for three days, then power restored – there was a bedraggled magpie hanging close, and a small goanna wandering around. The kookaburras were calling a lot a odd times of day. Things are slowly getting back towards normal animal wise; lots more birds, the wombats, and the magpie with a mate.

    That’s reassuring to hear, Itza. Kind of. 🙂

  7. Nath

    From earlier:

    @Fulvio Sammutsays:
    Monday, February 3, 2020 at 10:06 pm
    Nath mentioned earlier that some of his posts did not appear.

    There is a red bin with a “request deletion” message on my home computer next to all Nath’s post.

    Others may have been endowed with the same facility (similar things have happened from time to time) and may have made the request. I have not.

    But that may be the cause of his problem.

  8. Astrobleme,
    Next week with Paul Kelly’s new song and discussion about the new Climate Change paradigm should be interesting.

    It’s going to be, Do Something about mitigating emissions and Climate Change itself VS Resilience and Adaptation, I fear. It seems the Right have made the strategic move to acknowledge CC is real now but want to promotoe a Survival of the Fittest and most Resilient Adapters instead.

  9. Hamish tried the balancey thing against obvious audience contempt by reminding them that the government was elected with a climate change policy so we should accept that’s what we want.

    I don’t accept that.

  10. I thought Hamish did well. He kept bringing people back to the question, but he’ll grow into the format of moderating / facilitating a discussion as he gets used to it.

  11. Confessions @ #850 Monday, February 3rd, 2020 – 11:39 pm

    I thought Hamish did well. He kept bringing people back to the question, but he’ll grow into the format of moderating / facilitating a discussion as he gets used to it.

    Well I hope he grows out of accepting something just because the government won the election, even though it’s honestly the wrong thing.

  12. Hamish tried the balancey thing against obvious audience contempt by reminding them that the government was elected with a climate change policy so we should accept that’s what we want.

    He seemed to be trying to use that to rebut the scientist on a question of fact, which seemed a bit odd.

    Like if 51% of Australia voted that Gravity was a pernicious myth, it still wouldn’t be a good idea to jump out of a plane without a parachute.

  13. https://cleantechnica.com/2020/02/01/64-million-makes-it-official-renewable-hydrogen-in-natural-gas-out-eventually/

    How Low Can Renewable Hydrogen Go?
    The way FCTO sees it, electrolyzer manufacturers could learn a thing or two from fuel cell manufacturers about cutting costs.

    The strategy for the new round of funding involves building economies of scale into the electrolyzer supply chain, and adopting some of the the high volume, high throughput techniques used for making fuel calls.

    Integrating fuel cell technology, standardizing systems and components, and reducing the complexity of membrane-based electrolyzers can also contribute to the cost-cutting effort.

    So, how low can hydrogen go? FCTO is not shy about waving its track record on that score. They take credit for supporting R&D programs that have already reduced the cost of electrolyzers by 80% since 2002.

    There is still a long row to hoe. The electrolyzers of today are low-volume (less than 5-megawatt) devices that can cost more than $1000 per kilowatt.

    In contrast, FCTO is envisioning a scenario in which the cost of large-scale electrolyzers drops down to the range of $400/kW or less, making it possible to achieve a target cost for hydrogen of less than $2.00 per kilogram.

    Quite impressive. Now lets see if Australia opts in or misses out..

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