Essential Research: leader ratings and protest laws

Discouragement for Newspoll’s notion of an Anthony Albanese approval surge, plus a mixed bag of findings on the right to protest.

The latest fortnightly Essential Research poll still offers nothing on voting intention, though it’s relative interesting in that it features the pollster’s monthly leadership ratings. Contrary to Newspoll, these record a weakening in Anthony Albanese’s ratings, with approval down three to 37% and disapproval up five to 34%. Scott Morrison also worsens slightly, down two on approval to 45% and up three on disapproval to 41%, and his preferred prime minister read is essentially steady at 44-28 (43-28 last month).

Further questions relate to the right to protest, including the finding that 33% would support laws flagged by Scott Morrison that “could make consumer or environment boycotts illegal”, while 39% were opposed. Fifty-eight per cent agreed the government had “the right to limit citizen protests when it disrupts business”, with 31% for disagree; but that 53% agreed that “protestors should have the right to pressure banks not to invest in companies that are building coal mines”, with 33% disagreeing.

The poll was conducted Thursday to Sunday from a sample of 1075 respondents chosen from an online panel.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,832 comments on “Essential Research: leader ratings and protest laws”

  1. @nath

    At a federal level, the Liberals are not marginalized, they only lost Corganmite and Dunkley which became Labor through a redistribution and retained the other seats.

    Scott Morrison in being an Evangelical Christian, arguably helped the Liberal Party particularly in the Eastern Suburbs of Melbourne which has considerable areas, that are considered it’s bible belt, to hold the line. Kinda of ironic, since Liberal MP’s in Melbourne generally voted for Dutton in the leadership spill.

  2. Tristo
    says:
    Monday, November 18, 2019 at 11:35 am
    @nath
    At a federal level, the Liberals are not marginalized, they only lost Corganmite and Dunkley which became Labor through a redistribution and retained the other seats.
    ______________________________________
    I was talking about them being marginalised by being an increasingly social conservative outfit in a very progressive state. But yes, at the federal level they are marginalised with 12 seats to Labor 21, 3 Nats, 1 Grn, 1 Ind. It’s their worst state federally by a mile.

  3. Water Minister David Littleproud has publicly lamented the fact very few new dams have been built since 2003.

    But the institute has found at least 20 new dams have been constructed on private property in recent years, funded at least in part by Australian taxpayers.

    Ms Slattery new dams in the Murrumbidgee Valley had the potential to dry up river flows into the Murray.

    “If any other industry wasted taxpayer money on environmentally and socially damaging projects like this, there would be a national outcry,” she said.

    https://www.sbs.com.au/news/up-to-30-dams-built-with-government-subsidies-despite-minister-s-claim

  4. jenauthor @ #1545 Monday, November 18th, 2019 – 11:14 am

    I’m not a Nostradamus advocate, but the current situation world-wide is, in tota, quite noticeably uneasy. There are riots happening in quite a few countries. We have despots and r-w totalitarians in quite a few countries. Even so-called liberal-democracies are shaky and full of unrest.

    One could easily call Trump or Xi ‘anti-christ’ types.

    Then you have all the major, unprecedented climate events.

    Apocalyptic in many ways.

    I’m not alarmist … no no NO! Surely you jest.

    MOH calls Murdoch the Anti-Christ.

  5. @SophiaMcGrane
    ·
    3m
    mmm.. this is indeed an ingenious way to not only hide where large donations come from but also using 3rd party means the funds raised aren’t required to be declared

    Jim Molan’s 2019 campaign raised $43,000 from online crowdfunding sites

  6. Former prime minister Paul Keating has condemned the Australian government, media and security and intelligence establishment for failing to properly understand and respond to the “rise, legitimacy and importance” of China.

    “Big states are rude and nasty but that does not mean we can afford not to deal with them,” he told an audience at a strategic forum in Sydney on Monday.
    Former prime minister Paul Keating says Australia has to deal with China.

    Former prime minister Paul Keating says Australia has to deal with China. Credit:Alex Ellinghausen

    “China will be, and is, the predominant economic power in Asia … that proposition will not be usurped by a non-Asian power either economically or militarily.

    “The question for us is how does Australia respond to this. [Do we] help define and construct a set of arrangements which engages China but which prevents China from dominating the region? Or do we seek to insulate or remove ourselves from this enormous shift in world economic power by allowing our singular focus on the United States and our alliance with it to mark out our international personality?

    “My concern is [that] what passes for Australian foreign policy lacks any sense of strategic realism and that the whispered word ‘communism’ of old is now being replaced by ‘China’.”

    https://www.theage.com.au/world/asia/paul-keating-says-australia-is-failing-to-adapt-to-china-s-rise-20191118-p53biz.html

  7. Morrison,

    Speaking to reporters on Monday, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the comments were “appallingly insensitive”.

    “He’s a free citizen, he can say whatever he likes, but that doesn’t mean he can’t have regard to the grievous offence this would have caused to people whose homes have been burnt down.

    Mr Morrison said Folau’s comments would have also offended “many Christians in Australia for whom that is not their view at all, and whose thoughts and prayers … are very much with those who are suffering under the terrible burden of fire.”

    Albanese,

    “It would be good if people thought before they spoke. These comments certainly won’t bring anything positive or constructive to the debate,” he said.

    “Mr Folau has a history of making provocative comments. He’s entitled to his view but it’s also incumbent upon people who have a bit of common sense here to reject those comments.”

    and Joyce,

    “He throws rocks at us so he feels good, we throw rocks back at him so we feel good … but not one of those actions is making a sandwich for a person fighting the fires,”

    https://www.smh.com.au/national/alan-jones-tells-israel-folau-it-s-time-to-button-up-over-bushfire-comments-20191118-p53bim.html

  8. Boerwar @ #28595 Monday, November 18th, 2019 – 7:56 am

    ‘E. G. Theodore says:
    Sunday, November 17, 2019 at 10:54 pm

    Diogenes:

    I found a list of defunct historical medical terms:
    https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/illnesses-ailments-diseases-history-names/

    There are several instances of the definite article:
    – the horrors (not clear what it is – maybe sepsis/septic shock? “the horrors” seems to be associated with alcohol abuse…)
    – the quinsy (painful abscess in the tissue around a tonsil that accompanies more severe forms of tonsillitis)
    – the headache
    – the blind staggers (this is selenium toxicity in livestock, and might be something to do with alcoholism in humans)
    – the dropsy (ascites?)
    – the lockjaw (tetanus, fatal in nine days in the case reported)

    Of these I have read:

    ‘the horrors’. Not to be confused with Conrad’s ‘the horror, the horror.’
    ‘quinsy’ as opposed to ‘the quinsy’
    ‘a headache’ as opposed to ‘the headache’
    ‘dropsy’ as opposed to ‘the dropsy’
    ‘lockjaw’ as opposed to ‘the lockjaw’. In my youth ‘lockjaw’ was a staple for a series of sex jokes.

    The point is, I suppose, that several terms have involved the use of both the definite and the indefinite articles.

    In the Modern period (ie 1500+), English English usage & norms have evolved faster than English Medicine (which was pretty slow compared to French & German Medicine until ~1900 anyway). Pathogenesis and the slippery concept of disease has always rendered our technical terminology slippery and subject to massive, even fundamental change and inaccuracy. Plus ca change…

    Have a look at some of the technical terms in the London Bill of Mortality 1665 (the annus horrabilis): which includes dropsy (oedema), rising of the lights (pancreatic cancer), teeth (!), overlaid & smotherd (probably infanticide), as well as the plague (Y. pestis).

  9. Something for the PB inhouse medical squad
    …………………………………………………………………………….
    Zero gravity made some astronauts’ blood flow backwards

    The changes to circulation caused two astronauts to develop small blood clots, which could have been fatal – but fortunately the man and woman affected came to no harm.

    The blood changes happened in a vessel called the left internal jugular vein,
    https://www.newscientist.com/article/2223705-zero-gravity-made-some-astronauts-blood-flow-backwards/#ixzz65aQ4JFhu

  10. nath @ #1564 Monday, November 18th, 2019 – 11:29 am

    There are only 2 women amongst the 12 Liberal Federal Victorians of the HoR, or 16%.

    If the Liberals don’t get rid of Kevin Andrews and find a female candidate to replace him they will further marginalise themselves in Victoria.

    I’d love to see Georgina Downer run for that seat in a by-election and get beat by a Green Independent.

  11. Itza Dream @11:44.

    Who or what is MOH? I’m assuming that you are not referring to the Ministry of Health or the ancient sanskrit “to become stupefied, to be bewildered or perplexed” (or maybe “bemused”).

  12. KJ

    ‘…
    “No, Aborigines weren’t primitive hunter-gatherers, but sophisticated farmers with an “agricultural industry” — tilled fields, big villages and huge overhead granaries. That is, until it was destroyed by wicked men as white as, er, Pascoe’s face.

    This is the kind of anti-white story that the woke now love, and so Pascoe was given the NSW Premier’s Prize for Book of the Year and another for best indigenous writer. The Australia Council gave him a lifetime achievement award.

    He’s even been made a professor in the indigenous faculty of the University of Technology Sydney.'”

    Bolt’s is just intelligent enough to jump to false conclusions, and has plenty of bile in his veins to give it an unwholesome go.

    Pascoe’s book is heavily based on a number of sources that fall squarely within the Western Civilization traditions of ‘real’ history writing. Especially important is Bill Gammadge’s book, ‘The Biggest Estate on Earth: How Aborigines Made Australia.’ This won the Prime Minister’s Award for history, won another award and was shortlisted for a further award. The reason Gammadge’s work was so important was that it was a major go at bringing together material from many sources and from many disciplines. The scale is continental. Gammage has a distinguished career in academic history writing.

    There are, IMO, legitimate ‘academic’ concerns about Gammadge’s work but the gist of his history, at least, is almost unassailable. The specific items, that in his devotion to ignorance and ideology, Bolt loves to piss on, are ALL derived from white sources. In many cases they rely on the usually-accurate descriptions that the first white ‘explorers’ made of what they saw as they moved through the Indigenous Estate for the first time. Why are they such excellent sources? Because those guys were selected and paid for on their ability to reconnoitre and report back to the invaders. There is extensive corroboration for most, if not all, the larger historical land management claims. The disputed interpretations tend to be in domains such as ecology and fire science.

    IMO, there is also ample room to step back and re-evaluate some of the larger ‘benign’ assumptions. For example, it is arguable that fire stick farming over the millenia helped destroy the productivity of Australian soils by sending nutrients out to sea. That is a matter for serious academic debate by serious academic people who know what they are talking about, and not for the frothings of someone who somehow or other could not complete his undergraduate degree.

    Gammage, unlike Pascoe, is not Indigenous. Bolt’s very, very nasty go at Pascoe for having a white skin is another bit of serial personal viciousness from Bolt in this domain. The essential message from Bolt is that I am superior to you, my version of history is superiors to your’s, and you are only pretending not to be as white as me because you are seeking to game the system with your inferior history. IMO, that is about as personally vicious and nasty as it is possible to get for a white man in this country. Was it not Bolt who was convicted in court from within this general domain?

    Pascoe’s major contribution is that he has built on previous work including that of Gammadge but going beyond it. He has re-interpreted it from an Indigenous perspective, and has popularized it. In doing so he has, IMO, also given complexity, depth and validation to knowledge that Indigenous land managers take for granted.

    And, given that Pascoe’s main messages essentially destroy some of the ‘justifications’ used for a century and a half of massacres, stolen generations and the theft of a continent, not before time.

  13. jenauthor @ #1545 Monday, November 18th, 2019 – 11:14 am

    I’m not a Nostradamus advocate, but the current situation world-wide is, in tota, quite noticeably uneasy. There are riots happening in quite a few countries. We have despots and r-w totalitarians in quite a few countries. Even so-called liberal-democracies are shaky and full of unrest.

    One could easily call Trump or Xi ‘anti-christ’ types.

    Then you have all the major, unprecedented climate events.

    Apocalyptic in many ways.

    And all related.

  14. “God must have pretty bad aim if that’s what the bushfires were about.”

    Reminds me of a very old joke about a vicar and a parishioner given to bad language playing a round of golf. The punchline is the vicar being struck by lightning followed by a booming voice from on high “(Expletive deleted)! Missed again!”.

  15. Rex Douglas
    says:
    Monday, November 18, 2019 at 12:00 pm
    nath @ #1564 Monday, November 18th, 2019 – 11:29 am
    There are only 2 women amongst the 12 Liberal Federal Victorians of the HoR, or 16%.
    If the Liberals don’t get rid of Kevin Andrews and find a female candidate to replace him they will further marginalise themselves in Victoria.
    I’d love to see Georgina Downer run for that seat in a by-election and get beat by a Green Independent.
    _____________________________
    IMHO Menzies is still strongly Liberal. I think the only way to get rid of Andrews is via preselection. I would much rather someone like Katie Allen replace him. He has been an unfortunate influence on Australian politics.

  16. lizzie

    Insurance has always been a sort of proxy signal for larger realities.

    Britain was very nearly crippled financially when private insurers pulled out of shipping insurance during World War 1 and the British Government had to self-insure. Financiers in the US became increasingly concerned about their loans to Britain and applied increasing pressure on Wilson to join the war in order to protect their investments.

    Insurance was basically priced out of vegetable crops when we were growing strawbs and caulis in the early eighties.

    Since then the value of crop insurance has tended to retreat to irrigated crops. It is not just the growing conditions that influence insurance industry decisions. Volatility in commodity prices and the existing debt loads of farmers are also considerations.

    It comes as no surprise that farmers and their representative organisations and the Nationals are leaving no stone unturned in their search for every more pathways to gaining subsidies.

    Why not seek subsidies for insurance? They might get away with it! It is not as if our rural socialists have any interest in market forces. Except when it suits them.

  17. Boerwar (AnonBlock)
    Monday, November 18th, 2019 – 12:02 pm
    Comment #1548

    Good information. While reading prompted by Mr. Bolt’s article I noted references to Bill Gammadges work.

    White Australia’s burning issue − what’s wrong with Bill Gammage’s book

    https://www.foe.org.au/white-australias-burning-issue-%E2%88%92-whats-wrong-bill-gammages-book

    A popular argument suggests Aboriginal people always burned country so non-Aboriginal Australians should too, albeit for modern purposes, such as fuel reduction burns. Historian Bill Gammage argued this in the popular and influential book The Biggest Estate on Earth (2011).

    Remarkably, the book has attracted the praise of writers from both the left-wing Green Left Weekly and the far-right Institute of Public Affairs (IPA).

    Jeez me hearty -time to break out the Creaming Soda & Ice Cream.

    Let’s hear it for the IPA

    Nothing to do with the IPA -⏬⏬⏬

    What do bullies and sperm have in common?

    They both have a one-in-a-million chance of becoming a human being.

    Good afternoon all.

    P.S. I gotta get me one a them fancy tall glasses so that when the family arrive bearing cup cakes I can pretend to gentility only spill a little down the front of my regimental Tee Shirt (to match the tomato juice thereon).

    Would cows with guns be of use in National Parks ❓

  18. Boerwar @ #1578 Monday, November 18th, 2019 – 12:24 pm

    What has Glady’s woken up about?
    That the growing consequences of global warming are going to be difficult to manage, politically?

    Nah, simply that she might get voted out at the next election if she doesn’t throw a few crumbs at the RFS. So, yeah, I guess you could say that it has become politically difficult for her.

  19. guytaur:

    Alan Jones has attacked Folau for his comments on 2GB. I think the “Religious Freedom Bill” May be dead.

    I am certainly hoping so.

    Yes, I was thinking that this latest Folau speech is going to do wonders for the Religious Freedom Bill…

  20. ‘First world’ eaters have grown more and more fussy. When my parents killed a pig we ate every morsel, as would all ‘peasant’ societies, and cuts that are now thrown to animal waste were delicacies then. This is another shot at those who throw away over 50% of a fish. I hope this young man prospers.

    Niland loves fish. He loves how difficult it is to prepare. He loves that most people find it very hard to cook. He loves that a lot of people have issues eating it, that they are put off by the smell, the texture or the notion that fish is somehow “feminine”. He loves the fact that even people who do like fish would run a mile when presented with, say, head terrine or an appetiser made from fish eye balls. All of this makes his work more important, more vital. Since 2016, Niland has endeavoured to challenge all these convictions at his 34-seat Sydney restaurant, Saint Peter, and at his shop, Fish Butchery, a couple of doors down. For the rest of the world, he has his hyper-stylised Instagram account and he has now written the essential, enthralling Whole Fish Cookbook.

    https://www.theguardian.com/food/2019/nov/17/josh-niland-whole-fish-cookbook-pioneer-chef-nose-to-tail-fish

  21. lizzie @ #1582 Monday, November 18th, 2019 – 12:48 pm

    ‘First world’ eaters have grown more and more fussy. When my parents killed a pig we ate every morsel, as would all ‘peasant’ societies, and cuts that are now thrown to animal waste were delicacies then. This is another shot at those who throw away over 50% of a fish. I hope this young man prospers.

    Niland loves fish. He loves how difficult it is to prepare. He loves that most people find it very hard to cook. He loves that a lot of people have issues eating it, that they are put off by the smell, the texture or the notion that fish is somehow “feminine”. He loves the fact that even people who do like fish would run a mile when presented with, say, head terrine or an appetiser made from fish eye balls. All of this makes his work more important, more vital. Since 2016, Niland has endeavoured to challenge all these convictions at his 34-seat Sydney restaurant, Saint Peter, and at his shop, Fish Butchery, a couple of doors down. For the rest of the world, he has his hyper-stylised Instagram account and he has now written the essential, enthralling Whole Fish Cookbook.

    https://www.theguardian.com/food/2019/nov/17/josh-niland-whole-fish-cookbook-pioneer-chef-nose-to-tail-fish

    They make the best ever Lemon Tart in the whole wide world, and we’ve done the trials, tough gig but someone had to. 😉

  22. lizzie @ #1584 Monday, November 18th, 2019 – 12:51 pm

    Scott Morrison agrees that Malcolm Turnbull would have won the last election had he not been dumped as leader.

    Is chutzpah the right word for this, from the guy who knocked Turnbull off? I’m a bit taken aback.

    https://www.afr.com/politics/federal/turnbull-would-have-won-the-election-morrison-20191118-p53bj6

    Chutzpah. The best definition I’ve heard is getting into a revolving door behind someone but coming out in front.

    Morrison’s a sleaze. This is multilayered sleaze. Labor Bad is a major ingredient.

  23. I remember a kill in the NT in the 60s. It was near a boundary fence. Never kill your own. Gun man up a tree. Cattle mustered below. BANG. The carcas was immediately roughly cut, and chucked onto some gum branches in the back of a ute. All the meat went to the station to be cooked every which way. The gizzards and offal were tossed to the attendant aborigines, Jimmy and Shiela JamTin. The air was thick with flies. The heat was oppressive. Jimmy and Sheila seemed happy with their lot. I felt sick.

  24. ItzaDream

    Thank you. I really enjoyed reading that as I sipped my ‘slimming’ miso broth. I’d love to know how the ‘mashed potato crisps’ are made.

  25. lizziesays:
    Monday, November 18, 2019 at 1:27 pm

    ItzaDream

    Thank you. I really enjoyed reading that as I sipped my ‘slimming’ miso broth. I’d love to know how the ‘mashed potato crisps’ are made.

    It’s just extruded.

    I had fried mashed potato balls at an Indian restaurant in Myanmar. They were divine, especially the curry centres. 🙂

  26. Morrison strongly defends Hastie and Paterson while criticising China for not issuing them visas.

    Prime Minister Scott Morrison has labelled China’s decision to ban Liberal MPs Andrew Hastie and James Paterson from visiting the country “very disappointing”.

    Mr Morrison said it was up to Chinese authorities to explain the move and defended the right of his MPs to speak out on human rights issues. He also said a human rights partnership with China was discontinued because it “wasn’t getting the job done”…

    “They were denied visas, which I think was very disappointing,” Mr Morrison told Adelaide’s FiveAA radio station. “The response by Senator Paterson and Andrew Hastie I thought was spot on, I thought it was very measured, it was very strong, I thought it was very appropriate.

    https://www.theage.com.au/politics/federal/china-s-ban-on-liberal-mps-hastie-paterson-very-disappointing-morrison-20191118-p53bj1.html

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