Essential Research: leader ratings and protest laws

Discouragement for Newspoll’s notion of an Anthony Albanese approval surge, plus a mixed bag of findings on the right to protest.

The latest fortnightly Essential Research poll still offers nothing on voting intention, though it’s relative interesting in that it features the pollster’s monthly leadership ratings. Contrary to Newspoll, these record a weakening in Anthony Albanese’s ratings, with approval down three to 37% and disapproval up five to 34%. Scott Morrison also worsens slightly, down two on approval to 45% and up three on disapproval to 41%, and his preferred prime minister read is essentially steady at 44-28 (43-28 last month).

Further questions relate to the right to protest, including the finding that 33% would support laws flagged by Scott Morrison that “could make consumer or environment boycotts illegal”, while 39% were opposed. Fifty-eight per cent agreed the government had “the right to limit citizen protests when it disrupts business”, with 31% for disagree; but that 53% agreed that “protestors should have the right to pressure banks not to invest in companies that are building coal mines”, with 33% disagreeing.

The poll was conducted Thursday to Sunday from a sample of 1075 respondents chosen from an online panel.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,832 comments on “Essential Research: leader ratings and protest laws”


  1. RI says:
    Thursday, November 14, 2019 at 10:58 pm

    I could be mistaken but I understand Adani now propose a mine that will allegedly deliver 2.6 million tonnes pa., down from 60 million and then 26 million tonnes pa. This compares with QLD total thermal coal output of around 83 million tonnes pa.

    You going to build a railway line for 2.6 million tonnes? The whole thing is an elaborate con with the Greens being willing participants. When your wedging Labor why stick with reality.

  2. Good morning Dawn Patrollers

    The day of reckoning for the Morrison government is rapidly approaching warns Shane Wright and it will have to come to light in next month’s MYEFO.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/evel-knievel-would-fail-to-jump-the-gap-between-economic-rhetoric-and-reality-20191114-p53ani.html
    According to Wright the Morrison government is looking at ways to deliver tax relief to middle income earners after the nation suffered its biggest one-month fall in jobs in more than three years.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/government-looks-at-ways-to-cut-taxes-as-jobs-market-stumbles-20191114-p53apm.html
    Jacqui Maley reports on Julie Bishop warning that he world is at an “inflection point” with the international rules-based order under threat from a rising tide of populism and trade protectionism, including from “populist leader” Donald Trump.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/frustrated-and-angry-bishop-fears-a-backlash-against-globalisation-20191114-p53apv.html
    Fergus Hunter writes that a former intelligence officer is the target of a police investigation into the leak of classified information to journalist Annika Smethurst.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/documents-name-ex-intelligence-officer-as-alleged-source-of-leak-to-smethurst-20191114-p53aq5.html
    David Crowe explains Morrison’s union crushing legislation saying that those who say the government has no agenda may soon discover there is one and that they do not like it. When that happens, they will want the heavy machinery of the Senate to move even more slowly.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/union-busting-prime-minister-takes-the-stage-20191114-p53aq7.html
    Dana McCauley tells us that Christian Porter says he won’t let Labor’s Senate inquiry into wage theft delay his plan to criminalise the worst cases of underpayment by employers, and is pushing ahead with plans to introduce legislation (which has been cautiously welcomed by unions) early in the parliamentary new year.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/porter-on-track-to-criminalise-wage-theft-by-early-next-year-20191114-p53an0.html
    Rod Meyer suggests that Frydenberg’s infrastructure tax cut for offshore companies is being driven by powerful interests.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/money/finance-news/2019/11/14/infrastructure-tax-cut/
    Why the secrecy? Most of the Big Four’s audit inspections are blacked out; huge chunks redacted by the corporate regulators. In what other field would multiple breaches of the law be tolerated? asks Michael West.
    https://www.michaelwest.com.au/audit-blackout-gatekeepers-cuddled-while-sleeping-on-the-job/
    Italy’s government is set to declare a state of emergency in flood-ravaged Venice to swiftly secure the historic city funds to repair damage from the highest tide in 50 years.
    https://www.smh.com.au/world/europe/italian-government-set-to-declare-state-of-emergency-in-venice-20191115-p53ast.html
    Andy Marks tellingly contrasts the political responses to extreme weather events by leaders in London and Venice and other places to those in Australia.
    https://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/in-london-and-venice-the-c-word-isn-t-a-dirty-word-20191114-p53ap2.html
    And Phil Coorey goes into how the Coalition became a lightning rod for climate rage.
    https://www.afr.com/politics/federal/how-the-coalition-became-a-lightning-rod-for-climate-rage-20191113-p53aco
    Michelle Grattan says that when the firiefighters call him out on climate change, Scott Morrison should listen. In the article she considers three factors now weighing on the PM.
    https://theconversation.com/grattan-on-friday-when-the-firies-call-him-out-on-climate-change-scott-morrison-should-listen-127049
    Sourced from the New York Times The New Daily presents an article that decries Australia’s efforts on facing up to climate change.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/2019/11/14/while-australia-burns-the-world-watches-our-credibility-go-up-in-smoke/
    Paul Karp was at the NPC yesterday and tells us that Stuart Robert has defended the governance of the National Disability Insurance Agency, but refused to sign up to more ambitious targets to get younger people out of aged care.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/nov/14/ndis-minister-stuart-robert-defends-governance-of-disability-agency-after-series-of-controversies
    AustralianSuper chief executive Ian Silk has said both Coalition and Labor governments had been unwise to make taper rates more precipitous, and the issue should be a matter of priority for the retirement income inquiry.
    https://www.afr.com/companies/financial-services/retirement-inquiry-should-look-at-pernicious-taper-rates-ian-silk-20191113-p53ae1
    The Coalition has defied a Senate order demanding it table documents to justify decisions made under the scandal-ridden $220m regional grants program with Canavan advising the Senate that the government would not be complying with a production of documents order relating to the grants program.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/nov/14/coalition-defies-senate-order-on-scandal-ridden-regional-grants-scheme
    Labor may consider targeting research and development spending at specific areas that could deliver large economic gains.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/targeted-r-and-d-may-be-best-way-to-use-scarce-dollars-labor-20191114-p53ami.html
    Students of faith will be “isolated” and “punished” as a result of the ACT government’s incoming school chaplains ban, an opposition backbencher has claimed.
    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6493035/punishment-politicians-clash-over-school-chaplains-ban/?cs=14225
    Research funding announcements have become a political tool, creating crippling uncertainty for academics bemoans physics professor Jody Bradby.
    https://theconversation.com/research-funding-announcements-have-become-a-political-tool-creating-crippling-uncertainty-for-academics-126919
    While unbiased reporting is essential, at times it is important for the media to recognise that sometimes an issue doesn’t have two sides, writes Noely Neate.
    https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/lies-from-both-sides-in-the-game-of-politics,13312
    The cost of mailing a letter in Australia is set to rise after the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission waved through Australia Post’s request to hike stamp prices by 10 per cent. The justification was based on falling sales volume – classic cost accounting death spiral stuff!
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/stamp-prices-set-to-rise-as-watchdog-approves-postal-rate-increase-20191114-p53ajp.html
    China Mengnui Dairy Company has been given the green light for its takeover of the popular infant formula group Bellamy’s – but there are conditions.
    https://www.afr.com/politics/federal/treasurer-approves-chinese-bid-for-bellamy-s-20191114-p53ah0
    Following a review of the flaws in NSW Labor, Chris Haviland suggests some recommendations in which it could be improved.
    https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/lavarch-review-its-time-to-fix-nsw-labor,13308
    Clancy Yeates reports that ASIC has rejected as myths claims that small business credit growth is being crimped by responsible-lending laws, amid a government push to improve small firms’ access to finance.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/banking-and-finance/asic-hits-out-at-business-credit-crunch-myths-20191114-p53amh.html
    US corporate lawyer James Phillips writes that if Trump is unfit for office, his impeachers need to convince swinging voters.
    https://www.smh.com.au/world/north-america/if-trump-is-unfit-for-office-his-impeachers-need-to-convince-swinging-voters-20191113-p53a9d.html
    A Guardian editorial says that Trump’s impeachment is a grave and necessary process.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/nov/14/the-guardian-view-on-donald-trumps-impeachment-a-grave-and-necessary-process
    Yet another US school shooting with multiple casualties.
    https://www.smh.com.au/world/north-america/shooting-reported-at-saugus-high-school-in-california-20191115-p53asw.html

    Cartoon Corner

    David Rowe with the impeachment process.

    From an acerbic Cathy Wilcox.

    Simon Letch and Andrew Dyson on Morrison’s union busting efforts.


    From Matt Golding.





    Jim Pavlidis goes west.

    Mark David at a bushfire emergency meeting.

    Zanetti just won’t give up!

    From Glen Le Lievre.

    Johannes Leak is cementing his tenure here.
    https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/258390a81498b55879c04d10a7f4f2a8?width=1024

    From the US











  3. Now we have some people claiming Adani is one big hoax. One look at the track record of the Adani company should be more than enough to make it clear that they are very serious about sacrificing the planet for profit. It’s not like this is their first dance…

  4. I thought they’d announced the BotY already? Bugger!

    And, DP, in answer to your question from the previous thread, no I don’t know where we are going yet. My sons inherited some money and are looking for a place to buy. 🙂

  5. According to Wright the Morrison government is looking at ways to deliver tax relief to middle income earners after the nation suffered its biggest one-month fall in jobs in more than three years.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/government-looks-at-ways-to-cut-taxes-as-jobs-market-stumbles-20191114-p53apm.html

    Cutting taxes is like cutting the interest rate, eventually it ceases to have the effect you want. And it generally benefits the already wealthy as opposed to the poor.

    And notice that the Tories never suggest cutting the GST. 😐

  6. “It’s the Black Throated Finch in a landslide!!!!”

    ***

    Larissa Waters, Greens senator: black-throated finch

    Your vote is powerful. The spotlight from this plucky little bird winning Australian bird of the year could make the difference between its survival and its extinction.

    The black-throated finch has already been forced out of 88% of its original range due to land clearing and habitat loss and is now only found in central Queensland, north-west of Clermont.

    Critically, the core part of its remnant habitat is in the footprint of Adani’s coalmine. The area earmarked to offset habitat loss is within the footprint of Clive Palmer’s coalmine!

    This finch has become a symbol for all that will be lost if we allow the Galilee coal basin to be opened up. We stand to lose so much if we don’t do everything we can to stop climate change but to achieve that we need to leave the coal – and the finches – in the Galilee basin alone.

    A vote for this finch is a vote for climate action!

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/nov/07/bird-of-the-year-anthony-albanese-josh-frydenberg-larissa-waters-barnaby-joyce-and-others-cast-their-vote

  7. Good Morning

    @noplaceforsheept tweets

    I’m not a “Twitter sleuth,” I’m a voter immensely concerned about the future & I vigorously object to being deceived by people I used to trust who do not disclose the blatant conflict of interest their interviewees have. https://twitter.com/latingle/status/1194800863358750720

    For all the Twitter sleuths, Janita Singh who appears in our Quiet Australians piece, USED to work for News Ltd’s local papers. She gave it up a few years ago to look after her special needs son. BTW I also used to work for News Ltd (but you could tell that anyway, couldn’t you)?

  8. Barnaby says his vote is for the Shrike-thrush.

    There was always a nest of a thrush on top of the door post at the front of our house at Danglemah. It meant spring.

    The likelihood of a Grey Shrike-thrush balancing a nest on a door post is no more probable than Barnaby being humble.

  9. Good on the Guardian readers.

    I hope though that the vetting process to weed out russian bots was good.

    @CloverMoore tweets

    @NSWRFS volunteers rushed to protect people and property & communities have come together to look after each other. On Monday, I will ask Council to provide a $300,000 donation to the NSW Rural Fire Service & $300,000 to the @cwaofnsw Drought Aid appeal.

    I agree with Grattan Morrison has set himself up for a big fall taking on the Firies. When it comes to trust Politicians and Journalists are way down the list and the Firies will have way more impact than the talking heads and punditry in all the Murdoch media.

    With conditions expected to worsen today my best wishes for all in the affected fire zones.

  10. From Newsweek, some very dry wit:

    Adam Schiff will soon announce the next round of open impeachment hearings but for now all eyes are on Trump. If the president follows his usual playbook he will hit out on Twitter at those who testified Wednesday, then ramp up with further insults of Democrats at his rally tonight.

  11. Thanks BK for the Dawn Patrol.

    From the BK Files. 👇👇

    Dana McCauley tells us that Christian Porter says he won’t let Labor’s Senate inquiry into wage theft delay his plan to criminalise the worst cases of underpayment by employers, and is pushing ahead with plans to introduce legislation (which has been cautiously welcomed by unions) early in the parliamentary new year.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/porter-on-track-to-criminalise-wage-theft-by-early-next-year-20191114-p53an0.html

    Part Fair Tale part obfuscation and part comedy.

    Either —👇👇

    “The government will not let Labor’s grandstanding delay the introduction of stronger safeguards and protections of employees’ hard earned wages,” he said on Thursday, describing the Senate inquiry as “a seven month talkfest”.

    Or maybe 👇👇

    Labor’s industrial relations spokesman Tony Burke said the opposition party had been calling on the Liberals for five years “to do something about worker underpayment, whether it occurs as a result of genuine payroll error or deliberate, systematic wage theft”.

    Comedy –👇👇

    It is understood that independent senator Cory Bernardi has agreed to vote for the bill.

    Well I’m independently surprised.

  12. Wow I thought Hanson was bad. I don’t think she went this far

    @dallo100 tweets

    “The prime minister has been criticised for refusing to sack his former aide after it emerged the Conservative party candidate wrote in the Spectator, under Boris Johnson’s editorship, that immigrants were to blame for bringing germs and HIV to the UK.” https://gu.com/p/cykh2/stw

  13. I don’t think this is a huge story, it just evokes a weary sigh. Business as usual.

    @BelindaJones68
    29m
    Coalition defies Senate order on scandal-ridden regional grants scheme
    This is becoming a HUGE story! McCormack approves a raft of dodgy deals worth millions, gets caught out, now refuses Senate order for details!

    What are they hiding?

  14. Many interesting things will emerge during the course of the murder trial in the Northern Territory.

    Will the police officer be allowed to leave the territory as part of his bail conditions?

    Will the DPP seek the revocation of Bail given the seriousness of the offence?

    What will be the composition of the jury hearing the matter and where will it be heard?

  15. Though it’s probably true that Barnyard’s family had cut down all the trees on their property and there was nowhere else for the poor bird to build a nest.

  16. GG

    Its the same argument the jury rejected. Until the High Court rules that the trial was unfair due to process and it was an unreasonable conclusion I stick with the jury decision. 12 of our peers made a decision made on the evidence that Bolt you and I have not seen.

  17. Oh look its my argument about not making deals with climate deniers.

    At the same time, the party refused to rule out an enormous coal mine in Queensland. Labor found itself criticised for not being bold enough by green-minded urbanites while still being held in deep suspicion by rural voters, who believed the party to be anti-coal and anti-farming.

    https://theconversation.com/to-win-a-climate-election-parties-need-ambition-not-compromise-with-the-fossil-fuel-industry-126862?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=twitterbutton

    ?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&q=45&auto=format&w=754&h=502&fit=crop&dpr=1

  18. This one is for the Astronomy nerds:

    Astronomers have discovered a runaway star travelling through the Milky Way at roughly 3.7 million miles per hour, accelerated to such high speeds by the supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy.

    A team led by Sergey Koposov from Carnegie Mellon University spotted the ultrafast star—dubbed S5-HVS1—in the constellation Grus using the 3.9-meter Anglo-Australian Telescope (AAT) near Coonabarabran, Australia, according to a study published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

    Further observations with the European Space Agency’s Gaia satellite revealed the star is moving around ten times faster than most stars in the galaxy and is on course to exit the Milky Way forever.

    “The velocity of the discovered star is so high that it will inevitably leave the Galaxy and never return,” Douglas Boubert, a co-author on the study from the University of Oxford in the U.K., said in a statement.

    These kinds of ultrafast stars were only discovered around two decades ago and astronomers know of only a few examples. So-called “hyper-velocity stars” travel at sufficient speeds to escape the galaxy by overcoming its strong gravitational pull. In order for this to be possible, these stars need to be accelerated to extremely high velocities by incredibly massive objects.

    According to a hypothesis proposed around 30 years ago, supermassive black holes—such as the one which lies at the center of the Milky Way—would be capable of such a feat if a binary star system came too close to one. In this case, the black hole would swallow one of the stars and eject the other at high velocities. This process is known as the Hills Mechanism.

    https://www.newsweek.com/supermassive-black-hole-ejected-star-leave-galaxy-1471483?utm_source=email&utm_medium=morning_brief&utm_campaign=newsletter

  19. lizzie @ #3 Friday, November 15th, 2019 – 6:06 am

    I hope that Boochani will be safe now.
    When will this cruelty end?

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/nov/14/behrouz-boochani-free-voice-manus-island-refugees-new-zealand-australia?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

    Interesting article.

    When will the cruelty end ❓ Immediately after the last vestige of racism disappears.

    However reading the article – a teaser leads to

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/nov/14/alan-alda-its-amazing-that-most-of-us-live-as-if-were-not-gonna-die

    The secret to a long marriage is a short memory.

    The movie ❓

    The urbane 83-year-old star of M*A*S*H, The West Wing and The Aviator settles in a glass-walled meeting room, acknowledges that we are here to talk about his new film, Marriage Story, but says he is happy to talk about anything. Over the next hour, he will discuss God, mortality, his mother, podcasting, science, Woody Allen and how he is, so far, unbowed by Parkinson’s disease.

    Could be a good one to keep in mind – although probably short on handy murder hints. ☮☕

  20. Something which gave me great pleasure just after dawn this morning was the whipcrack duet of a pair of Eastern Whipbirds, in the thick vegetation beside the drive. I also heard an echoing call in the distance, which gives me hope that we still have sufficient “wet forest” vegetation around here to sustain a population.

  21. As long as the LNP remains the best party that money can buy then the little people are screwed.

    On another point: The magic surplus is sacrosanct, so let’s consider giving them a…quiver in excitement…TAX CUT. It’s much better and it means we don’t have to touch our sacred and holy surplus.

    https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/tax-cut-on-the-cards-as-nsw-leads-jobs-slump-20191114-p53arj.html

    I’m also getting sick and tired hearing about this bloody jingoistic “Federation” bullshit that Treasurer Baby Potato…well, he does remind me more and more of being the treasury version of The Spud in looks keeps going on and on about.

  22. As the Gordon Wood trial in NSW demonstrates (Chamberlain as well), re-enactments, expert evidence etc have to be meticulous to have any value.

    I dunno if Bolt is being meticulous without knowing the totality of the trial evidence, but his reputation is for slackness given the Eatock case against him.

  23. As I watch the smoke which has settled outside my window again today, this time from the Wollemi fire, I am reflecting on the clear-eyed observations of this lady:

    “We still don’t have an energy policy, we don’t have effective climate policy – it’s really very depressing,” said Susan Harris Rimmer, an associate professor at Griffith Law School.

    But climate change is Australia’s labyrinth without an exit, where its pragmatism disappears.

    The bushfires that continued raging on Wednesday along the country’s eastern coast have revealed that the politics of climate in Australia resist even the severe pressure that comes from natural disaster.

    Instead of common-sense debate, there are culture war insults.

    The deputy prime minister calls people who care about climate change “raving inner-city lunatics”.

    And while the government is working to meet the immediate need – fighting fires, delivering assistance – citizens are left asking why more wasn’t done earlier as they demand solutions.

    “We still don’t have an energy policy, we don’t have effective climate policy – it’s really very depressing,” said Susan Harris Rimmer, an associate professor at Griffith Law School.

    “The higher the flames in the bush, the lower the politics,” blared a headline in The Sydney Morning Herald.

    While the latest conflict has flared as smoke fills the skies of Sydney, its roots go back years, maybe centuries.

    Even as the country’s emissions continue to soar, it’s been hard to reach a political consensus on energy and climate change policy because of Australia’s mining history and a powerful lobby for one product: Coal.

    “Coal is our NRA,” said Dr Harris Rimmer, referring to the National Rifle Association, which has stymied changes to gun laws in the US even as mass shootings have become shockingly common.

    “They have total control over Parliament.”

    The comparison has its limits. Coal is not enshrined in the constitution, as a right to bear arms is in the US, nor is it a consumer product. But like guns in America, coal helped define the country in its early years of settlement – and is still an outsize presence in Australian life.

    The industry’s economic benefits reach fewer people than many Australians believe.

    It frequently hires federal lawmakers after they leave office, and even now politicians often defend coal in patriotic terms.

    For conservatives in particular, extraction of natural resources in rural areas is a stand-in for values worth fighting for against condescending urban elites.

    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/2019/11/14/while-australia-burns-the-world-watches-our-credibility-go-up-in-smoke/

    *sigh*

  24. Kronomex,
    You’re right. This government just rolls on with their premeditated agenda for the benefit of their vested interest mates and donors. What can we, the little people, do? They don’t listen to us.

  25. “Barnaby says his vote is for the Shrike-thrush.” I didn’t realise that the Minister for Employment, Skills, Small and Family Business had been added to the bird list. Personally, I would have voted for the Grey Fantail if it had been nominated.

  26. Cat

    On climate change.Labor needs to stop being distracted by the Greens because it has wedged itself on Adani.

    Instead it needs to go full bore on attacking the LNP.

    For Labor people it should be simple. You think the Greens are too extreme on the environment but at least they have an environment and energy policy. Like Labor at least the Greens want Australia to have a future.

    Wedge the bloody LNP right back and point out their extremism big time. If it was not for Adani I think this is exactly what Labor would be doing right now.

  27. guytaur @ #37 Friday, November 15th, 2019 – 8:11 am

    Cat

    On climate change.Labor needs to stop being distracted by the Greens because it has wedged itself on Adani.

    Instead it needs to go full bore on attacking the LNP.

    For Labor people it should be simple. You think the Greens are too extreme on the environment but at least they have an environment and energy policy. Like Labor at least the Greens want Australia to have a future.

    Wedge the bloody LNP right back and point out their extremism big time. If it was not for Adani I think this is exactly what Labor would be doing right now.

    ‘Instead it needs to go full bore on attacking the LNP.’
    Like that’s going to happen.
    ‘Wedge the bloody LNP right back and point out their extremism big time’.
    Like that’s going to happen.

  28. shellbell @ #32 Friday, November 15th, 2019 – 7:59 am

    As the Gordon Wood trial in NSW demonstrates (Chamberlain as well), re-enactments, expert evidence etc have to be meticulous to have any value.

    I dunno if Bolt is being meticulous without knowing the totality of the trial evidence, but his reputation is for slackness given the Eatock case against him.

    In a case where a single witness account of what allegedly occurred is the basis of the conviction, then information/evidence contradicting that account needs to be considered and tested.

  29. GG

    You are making the same mistake Bolt is making.

    You are trying to read the mind of the jury without seeing all the evidence.
    Its an assumption that its the evidence of one eyewitness.

    Then if you grant the assumption is correct you have to think its unreasonable that the account the jury decided on was true.

    If the High Court does overturn the decision it will first go to the process as the judges will not want to be second guessing the jury decision. Retrying the case is the last thing the High Court will want to do.

  30. It is a sign of the times that what used to be an amiable process in which people shared their love of birds has been politicized.

    Killjoys abound.

  31. Kronomex

    I love to see them, but the grey fantail is one of those fussy little birds that gets in the way whenever we try to focus on the smaller insect-eaters, as it often moves in packs. Now which pollie would spring to mind? 😆

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