Essential Research: US visit, economic conditions, Middle East intervention

A new poll records a broadly favourable response to Scott Morrison’s US visit, mixed feelings about the state of the economy, and support for Australia’s new commitment in the Middle East.

Essential Research has released its fortnightly poll, once again without voting intention results. It includes a series of questions on Scott Morrison’s visit to the United States, with results generally more favourable than I personally would have expected. For example, the most negative finding is that 32% agreed that Donald Trump’s presidency has been good for Australia, compared with 49% who disagreed. By way of comparison, a Lowy Institute survey in March found 66% believed Trump had weakened the alliance, and only 25% had either a lot of or some confidence in him.

Only 38% agreed that a good relationship between Scott Morrison and Donald Trump reflected badly on Australia, compared with 48% who disagreed. Other results were probably too influenced by question wording to be of much value. Fifty-seven percent felt Morrison had shown “good diplomacy skills” during the visit, a quality that might be attributed to anyone who maintains a straight face in the President’s presence. The statement that Morrison “should have attended the UN Climate Summit, alongside other world leaders” is compromised by the words in italics (which are my own), but for what it’s worth, 70% agreed and 20% disagreed.

A question on the state of the economy likewise produces a result less bad than the government might have feared, with 32% rating it good and 33% poor. Fifty-one per cent supported Australian military involvement in the Middle East, after it was put to them that Australia had “agreed to provide military support to their allies in the Middle East to protect shipping and trade in the region”, with 35% opposed.

Essential has not yet published the full report on its website, so the precise sample size cannot be identified, but it will assuredly have been between 1000 and 1100. The poll was conducted online from Thursday to Sunday.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,065 comments on “Essential Research: US visit, economic conditions, Middle East intervention”

  1. SecPompeo fails to meet House #subpoena deadline to produce #Ukraine-related documents.

    Impeach him. And while they’re at it, impeach Barr as well.

  2. Victoria says: Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 2:27 pm

    PhoenixRed

    Agreed.

    Pompeo and Barr should also be impeached.

    ****************************************************

    A few nights in Jeffrey Epsteins cell might make Barr a bit more cooperative …..


  3. SecPompeo fails to meet House #subpoena deadline to produce #Ukraine-related documents.

    To be expected, I would suspect and I am sure planned for. Interesting to see what Pelosi has lined up for him.

  4. Puppy news.

    Yesterday the poodle convinced herself that there is a mouse hiding behind the fridge and has spent hours snuffling into the gap beside it. Now, after a nap to regain her energy, she has noticed that in one of the fish tanks there is a grey shape that occasionally appears between the rocks (it’s a large bristlenose catfish). Obviously convinced that it’s the mouse, she’s climbed the stairs and has spent an hour leaning against the wires, trying to reach it through the glass.

  5. Nick Baker
    @nbaker_au
    · Oct 3
    Scott Morrison tells Sydney audience that Australia’s position on climate change has not impacted relations with Pacific countries. @SBSNews

    But

    simon holmes à court
    @simonahac
    ·
    6m
    i was in NYC last week for climate week & spoke with 2 people who were close to delegations at the pacific island forum.

    i was told that @ScottMorrisonMP shouted at other leaders, interrupted and was generally rude. (he ignored @jacindaardern‘s gentle advice on sidelines.)

  6. I’ve come to the conclusion that the biggest blight in world sports is not drugs but the gambling industry. Why else would all this technology be brought in if there wasn’t possibly millions of dollars riding on a ref/umpire’s decision? The latest example would be the current rugby world cup. Before the gambling industry got free reign to run in any sport, a ref/umpire would make a decision, a few grumbles and it would be accepted. Now? everything is reviewed and reviewed to the umpteenth degree. Why?….money….

  7. I’m assuming this is satire.

    Newly formed conservative activist group SPERM targets Australians turned-off by Greta Thunberg-style youth climate activism.

    The newly formed Society of Pale Elderly Rightwing Males (SPERM) said in a statement today that their aim is to counter what they say is the “hysterical” and “uppity” tone taken by child activists in recent times.

    SPERM spokesperson Hector Daily said membership of his group has been burgeoning after a recent recruiting drive in retirement villages and nursing homes in Sydney, rural Queensland and several other places Alan Jones is broadcast.


    SPERM have been joined by the Carbon Appreciation Coalition of Australia (CACA) to launch a petition objecting to what it describes as ‘all that silly nonsense and carry on’.

    They hope to present the signatures to the Prime Minister at the next sitting of Parliament, providing it doesn’t clash with bowls or Jock’s hip operation.

    https://independentaustralia.net/life/life-display/senior-conservatives-unite-to-oppose-thunberg-inspired-youth-climate-activism,13179#.XZgptV-3eO0.twitter

  8. Tony Windsor @TonyHWindsor
    ·
    1m
    Morrison is very sensitive to criticism , almost childlike and takes disagreement very personally. The Pacific Island fiasco and the latest “negative globalism” nonsense shows he knows he will be on the wrong side of history but will bluster trump-like to try and move on.

  9. “I’ve always believed that fishing was a contact sport!

    https://twitter.com/i/status/1180007269720842240

    Many years ago a journo mate of mine covered a story in Bunbury W.A.
    3 guys in a 16ft runabout fishing off shore. Hooked up a Mako about 8 feet long. Now, issue with Mako’s is that on a line they will jump out of the water. Shark heads for the bottom….and then the line goes slack. Mako erupts out of the water next to the boat and tips over to land IN the boat. 🙂

    Scattering of fishermen. three of them wound up on the fore-deck reahcing over for the radio while Mako is thrashing around in the boat. Some concern that it would put a hole in it and they would end up in the water with aforesaid now very annoyed shark. 🙂 They got picked up by a crayboat and all towed into Bunbury…with shark still in the boat.


  10. lizzie says:
    Saturday, October 5, 2019 at 5:13 pm

    Tony Windsor @TonyHWindsor
    ·
    1m
    Morrison is very sensitive to criticism , almost childlike and takes disagreement very personally.

    Matches well with the other two stooges.

  11. For people like you, briefly and a few others here, the time for action will … somehow … just never arrive.

    According to briefly (aka UI/RI), the WA Govt is currently taking action and (again according to Briefly) it is proving effective.

    Is Briefly simply mistaken? Is he lying or delusional?

  12. Another layer to the disreputable Trump presidency:

    House investigators are looking into an allegation that groups — including at least one foreign government — tried to ingratiate themselves to President Donald Trump by booking rooms at his hotels but never staying in them.

    It’s a previously unreported part of a broad examination by the House Oversight Committee, included in Democrats’ impeachment inquiry, into whether Trump broke the law by accepting money from U.S. or foreign governments at his properties.

    Story Continued Below
    “Now we’re looking at near raw bribery,” said Rep. Gerry Connolly (D-Va.), a House Oversight Committee member who chairs the subcommittee with jurisdiction over Trump’s hotel in Washington. “That was the risk from Day One: foreign governments and others trying to seek favor because we know Trump pays attention to this. … It’s an obvious attempt to curry favor with him.”

    https://www.politico.com/news/2019/10/02/trump-hotel-empty-rooms-016763

  13. “Is Briefly simply mistaken? Is he lying or delusional?”

    While he has a different and frankly a bit of a depressing perspective at the moment…….no. not lying or delusional.

  14. Hmm… everyone’s somewhere else.

    Check in later. EDIT. Spoke too soon.

    Re Frednk @6:10PM “Morrison is very sensitive to criticism , almost childlike and takes disagreement very personally.”

    Morrison, like so many righ wingers, doesn’t do discussion. He says what he wants to say, doesn’t brook opposing views, doesn’t answer questions he can’t answer with a talking point…

  15. Steve777,
    Personally, I’ve just come back from making and eating a very nice dinner of Olive, Lemon and Parmesan rissoles made into hamburgers with a Sriracha and Tomato sauce. 🙂

  16. Because the time for hollow action has ended. Coal supply will never be an issue. There are reserves in pretty much all countries. If there is a demand it will be supplied.

    Demand for (burning) coal recently and increasingly into the future centres around developing countries such as Indonesia which have:
    A – abundant domestic coal reserves
    B – strong growth in electricity demand (as they not unreasonably seek to join the wealthy developed nations)
    C – limited ability to deploy renewables (much easier to build coal power stations)

    Unless one thinks it somehow acceptable to repress such nations’ electricity demand (it is not acceptable to do this) then the only piece that moves is C Hence we need to make renewables more accessible in such markets.

  17. ” I’ve just come back from making and eating a very nice dinner of Olive, Lemon and Parmesan rissoles made into hamburgers with a Sriracha and Tomato sauce. “

    Sounds very nice. Had to look up sriracha.

  18. C@t:

    You’ve given away all your secrets. For a while there I was thinking you were a miracle worker kitchen goddess who throws together gourmet meals with an absolute minutiae of ingredients! 😀

  19. Anyone know when the becalmed Morrison government is back in parliament for another bout of yelling at Labor that it’s all their fault?

  20. WA looks like this:
    Pant commission year MW closes
    Collie 1999 340 2040
    Muja 1981 854 Units 1-4 2022 Units 5-6 2030->2022. 7-8 still at 2040
    Worsley Alumina 1982- 2012 107 Owned by BHP
    Bluewaters 2009[4] 416

    They have two years to deal with a considerable reduction of their Coal generation. The current government has brought forward the closure of two units. The distribution of WA power generation has to be very different in two years time or the economy put into tail spin.

    Briefly is very much telling the truth.
    P1 little link underlines the work that has to be done in the next two years.
    WA Labor is a doing it. Very different to sending a gas guzzler convoy to Queensland.

  21. So, if the Ukrainians had to turn their country’s criminal and national security infrastructure on its head, just to score a meeting and an Oval Office photo op with Trump…

    … according to the texts and Volker’s congressional testimony, as part of the public announcement of that visit, Zelensky would need to issue a “statement” outlining new investigations the country was launching, including into Burisma, the natural gas company with Hunter Biden on its board.

    https://talkingpointsmemo.com/muckraker/these-are-the-trump-desired-quid-pro-quos-states-ukraine-officials-were-pushing

    … what did Morrison have to agree to to earn a full State Visit (only the second so far in Trump’s incumbency)?

    And why aren’t our supposed senior journalists asking this question instead of wanking on about how clever Morrison is?

  22. P1
    I don’t think I missed the point. I also didn’t miss ( the nicest way of putting this), the dishonesty.
    Putting in place policies does not result in instant change. It takes time to build new stuff.
    Labor has put in place plant closures that will result in major changes to WA energy mix.

  23. C@tMomma and Fess,

    Confessions @ #1039 Saturday, October 5th, 2019 – 7:16 pm

    I’m curious to know how you make rissoles out of olives, lemon and parmesan that actually stay formed as rissoles.
    Oops! Forgot to add, chicken mince and egg.

    It must be the night for making rissoles. My lovely daughter and her son are living with us now – think Brideshead Revisited in the Sydney city fringe that is Waterloo.

    I normally cook vegetarian at home, but have decided to drop my strictness to accomodate daughter and absolutely gorgeous grandson.

    So, I made baked rissoles, with equal parts lentils and mince. Gravy with the yummy caramelised residue at the bottom of the baking pan.

    Daughter said that they were good, but would have been improved by some chilly.

    C@tMomma, Siracha sauce would have provided the perfect Umami taste.

  24. WA’s energy system is going to be transformed, whether PO likes it or not.

    There are many barriers to this but none are insurmountable. They will be resolved in an orderly way. The whole Government and party are committed to this.

  25. RI
    Some questions.
    1) Do you think the Asian hub will happen?
    2) Do you have enough projects in the pipeline to deal with the loss of the coal fired stations?
    3) What are you going to do about energy storage?

  26. frednk,

    P1
    I don’t think I Missed the point. I also didn’t miss ( the nicest way of putting this), the dishonesty.
    Putting in place policies does not result in instant change. It takes time to build to stuff.
    Labor has put in place plant closures that will result in major changes to WA energy mix.

    Demand for (burning) coal recently and increasingly into the future centres around developing countries such as Indonesia which have:
    A – abundant domestic coal reserves
    B – strong growth in electricity demand (as they not unreasonably seek to join the wealthy developed nations)
    C – limited ability to deploy renewables (much easier to build coal power stations)

    Unless one thinks it somehow acceptable to repress such nations’ electricity demand (it is not acceptable to do this) then the only piece that moves is C Hence we need to make renewables more accessible in such markets.

    frednk and EGT,

    Yes, putting a Herculean effort into making renewables affordable and accessible in the developing world is one of the single biggest things developed nations can do to stop fossil fuel burning (coal and gas).

    The is the fastest and most humane path to limiting anthropogenic global warming.

    I have looked for a good summary of the scienceof climate change, coupled with the social and political decisions that need to be made in light of this science.

    The best thing I have come top with is my OH’s ***former**** science home – so no current vested interests here.

    The UNSW Centre for Climate Change originally started at Macquarie University, and then moved to UNSW about a decade ago. I will defend these people to the hilt about their knowledge of both climate change and its effects on society. the following website is a great resource:

    http://web.science.unsw.edu.au/~stevensherwood/ClimateFAQ.html

  27. Dio and others,

    Thanks for your suggestions about what to do around Bayreuth.

    Dio, Germany is one of my favourite places ever, and if you can speak German (much better that my pidgin) you will love it.

    I particularly love the Rhineland.

    You are probably like me – I travel where my work takes me, and as far as I am concerned, this is the best form of travel. I live and work with the locals, and the immersion in the local culture is literally priceless.

    For me, I am planning to retire (from my day job) in about a year, and so then I will have to think about placed I would like to go, not work related – if we have money to travel of course.

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