Poll positioning

Fraught preselections aplenty as the major parties get their houses in order ahead of a looming federal election.

Kicking off a federal election year with an overdue accumulation of preselection news, going back to late November:

• Liberal Party conservative Craig Kelly was last month saved from factional moderate Kent Johns’ preselection challenge in his southern Sydney seat of Hughes, which was widely reported as having decisive support in local party branches. This followed the state executive’s acquiescence to Scott Morrison’s demand that it rubber-stamp preselections for all sitting members of the House of Representatives, also confirming the positions of Jason Falinski in Mackellar, John Alexander in Bennelong and Lucy Wicks in Robertson. Kelly had threatened a week earlier to move to the cross bench if dumped, presumably with a view to contesting the seat as an independent. Malcolm Turnbull stirred the pot by calling on the executive to defy Morrison, noting there had been “such a long debate in the New South Wales Liberal Party about the importance of grass roots membership involvement”. This referred to preselection reforms that had given Johns the edge over Kelly, which had been championed by conservatives and resisted by moderates. Turnbull’s critics noted he raised no concerns when the executive of the Victorian branch guaranteed sitting members’ preselections shortly before he was dumped as Prime Minister.

• The intervention that saved Craig Kelly applied only to lower house members, and was thus of no use to another beleaguered conservative, Senator Jim Molan, who had been relegated a week earlier to the unwinnable fourth position on the Coalition’s ticket. Hollie Hughes and Andrew Bragg were chosen for the top two positions, with the third reserved to the Nationals (who have chosen Perin Davey, owner of a communications consultancy, to succeed retiring incumbent John “Wacka” Williams). Despite anger at the outcome from conservatives in the party and the media, Scott Morrison declined to intervene. Morrison told 2GB that conservatives themselves were to blame for Molan’s defeat in the preselection ballot, as there was “a whole bunch of people in the very conservative part of our party who didn’t show up”.

• Labor’s national executive has chosen Diane Beamer, a former state government minister who held the seats of Badgerys Creek and Mulgoa from 1995 to 2011, to replace Emma Husar in Lindsay. The move scotched Husar’s effort to recant her earlier decision to vacate the seat, after she became embroiled in accusations of bullying and sexual harassment in August. Husar is now suing Buzzfeed over its reporting of the allegations, and is reportedly considering running as an independent. The Liberals have preselected Melissa McIntosh, communications manager for the not-for-profit Wentworth Community Housing.

• The misadventures of Nationals MP Andrew Broad have created an opening in his seat of Mallee, which has been in National/Country Party hands since its creation in 1949, although the Liberals have been competitive when past vacancies have given them the opportunity to contest it. The present status on suggestions the seat will be contested for the Liberals by Peta Credlin, who was raised locally in Wycheproof, is that she is “being encouraged”. There appears to be a view in the Nationals that the position should go to a woman, with Rachel Baxendale of The Australian identifying three potential nominees – Anne Mansell, chief executive of Dried Fruits Australia; Caroline Welsh, chair of the Birchip Cropping Group; and Tanya Chapman, former chair of Citrus Australia – in addition to confirmed starter Anne Warner, a social worker.

• Nationals Senator Bridget McKenzie yesterday scotched suggestions that she might run in Mallee. The view is that she is positioning herself to succeeding Cathy McGowan in Indi if she decides not to recontest, having recently relocated her electorate office from Bendigo to one of Indi’s main population centres, Wodonga. The Liberals last month preselected Steven Martin, a Wodonga-based engineer.

• Grant Schultz, Milton real estate agent and son of former Hume MP Alby Schultz, has been preselected as Liberal candidate for Gilmore on New South Wales’ south coast, which the party holds on a delicate margin of 0.7%. The seat is to be vacated by Ann Sudmalis, whose preselection Schultz was preparing to challenge when she announced her retirement in September. It was reported in the South Coast Register that Joanna Gash, who held the seat from 1996 to 2013 and is now the mayor of Shoalhaven (UPDATE: Turns out Gash ceased to be so as of the 2016 election, and is now merely a councillor), declared herself “pissed off” at the local party’s endorsement of Schultz, which passed by forty votes to nine.

• Hawkesbury councillor Sarah Richards has been preselected as the Liberal candidate in Macquarie, where Labor’s Susan Templeman unseated Liberal member Louise Markus in 2016.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

3,175 comments on “Poll positioning”

  1. LR

    Mavis Smith, C@tmomma

    I got a weird feeling when what seemed like a crescendo of posts on a range of topics suddenly stopped cold. I suppose we’ll see.

    I am just catching up on today on PB, and have skimmed through everything before thinking of replies. My replies have all been gazumped!

    On the teaching thing, I was going to mention first year physics lecturers who came from behind the Iron Curtain, who insisted on starting their first, first-year lecture with a “simple” triple integral in spherical (or even worse cylindrical) coordinates. But , Don, you got their first! I found them in tears in the corridors, and with a 10 min chat with lots of jokes, showed how the surface area of a sphere is just the surface of a sphere, no matter how complex you make it look. Apparently said colleagues do not like this approach because the really brilliant ones will be able to get there by themselves!

    Also, does anyone think that Sheldon would make a great high school physics teacher?

  2. A diet of fish and greens is good for writing. Whiskey is good for reading and Cointreau is good for sleeping.

    Oysters and tequila for…..

  3. briefly @ #2998 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:25 pm

    A diet of fish and greens is good for writing. Whiskey is good for reading and Cointreau is good for sleeping.

    Aah, Cointreau! I got my niece and her then girlfriend (now my sister in law) a little bit inebriated on that many years ago. They did forgive me – eventually! Iirc, it was the night my brother met his wife.

  4. Tom @ #3001 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:29 pm

    briefly @ #2998 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:25 pm

    A diet of fish and greens is good for writing. Whiskey is good for reading and Cointreau is good for sleeping.

    Aah, Cointreau! I got my niece and her then girlfriend (now my sister in law) a little bit inebriated on that many years ago. They did forgive me – eventually! Iirc, it was the night my brother met his wife.

    Tom,

    I drink what the Pope drinks. Creme de menthe. Had a pint when I was in Rome a long time ago. Woke up 3 days later!

  5. @a r – What the Mad Monk conveniently “forgets” to mention is that the Work For The Dole program is now expanded to 3 days/week and change – 25 hours weekly is just over 3 full days, meaning that participants have to block in travel time four days a week, plus three days of fulltime hours. In addition to the jobsearch requirements, that is.

    Very disappointed to see Labor endorse Mutual Obligation (i.e. WFTD) – not only is it an endorsement of Howardism, it flies in the face of what (of all people!) Menzies said about welfare: That the support of the State in tough times should be a right of all law-abiding citizens, not a privilege afforded to those who check enough bureaucratic boxes.

  6. Player One @ #2997 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:24 pm

    C@tmomma @ #2991 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:15 pm

    Mass Extinction events. The like of which we are able to experience in real time these days but which have been happening for millennia. Some of the deposits are made of fish. 🙂

    You mean like all the animals that Noah couldn’t fit on his ark? Mass extinction of unicorns and the like?

    I hate to be the one to tell you this, but … 🙁

    Don’t be a gormless git, P1.

    Formation of fossil fuels
    Crude oil, coal and gas are fossil fuels. They were formed over millions of years, from the remains of dead organisms:

    coal was formed from dead trees and other plant material
    crude oil and gas were formed from dead marine organisms

    https://www.bbc.com/bitesize/guides/z27thyc/revision/1

    Maybe instead of gasbagging about Maths and Physics, some revision of Chemistry and Earth Sciences is in order? 🙂

  7. Those cunning swine in the Coalition are covering all their bases 🙂

    After their………..

    If Labor’s reforms negative gearing it will see pensioners huddled around candles for warmth as they eat their dog food

    Josh ‘tonsure’ Frydenberg goes for

    Shorten will abandon negative gearing reforms, Frydenberg predicts

    https://outline.com/2cBWdq

  8. Douglas and Milko @ #3004 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:32 pm

    Also, thanks for the pi*z*z*a joke – I have not heard that one before!

    Bonus joke for nice comment!

    A physicist, a biologist, and a mathematician are sitting on a bench across from a house. They watch as two people go into the house, and then a little later, three people walk out.

    The physicist says, “The initial measurement was incorrect.”

    The biologist says, “They must have reproduced.”

    And the mathematician says, “If exactly one person enters that house, it will be empty.

  9. poroti @ #3011 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 1:37 pm

    Those cunning swine in the Coalition are covering all their bases 🙂

    After their………..

    If Labor’s reforms negative gearing it will see pensioners huddled around candles for warmth as they eat their dog food

    Josh ‘tonsure’ Frydenberg goes for

    Shorten will abandon negative gearing reforms, Frydenberg predicts

    https://outline.com/2cBWdq

    Aren’t candles more expensive than electric lights?

  10. @GG: Jaysis, a whole pint of Creme de Menthe? That stuff’s sweeter than a lover’s kiss, but it’s got a kick like an angry mule! I mean, it’s not Vodka or anything, but it’s stronger than the majority of sweet liqueurs. Advocaat, Bailey’s (mmm, Bailey’s…), Tia Maria, you name it.

    Reminds me of when I was in America on student exchange, and being a mature-age student, was able to legally buy alcohol. So I bought a “handle” of Smirnoff for the Super Bowl night, for a bunch of American students had invited me to spectate with them. Not much of that left by the end of the night (although I was sharing with the others, I was also drinking at least half of all the vodka that left the bottle), so it shouldn’t surprise anyone that I ended up in hospital. Not bad enough to require stomach pumping, just to warrant keeping me under observation, but it was a timely notice that my drinking wasn’t quite as under-control as I’d thought!

    Needless to say, I haven’t gotten “properly” plastered since – and that was a decade ago. Four drinks is my absolute limit these days.

  11. There’s boom and bust in nature, mostly in extremes of environmental situations or at the lowest level of life
    Most well established complex ecosystems are very stable and have been the saving grace of life on earth when big things have happened
    Busted ecosystems are not stable and are not refugia for life to re-populate from when other things happen
    There’s also collapse and extinction when the physical circumstances change so much that previously existing lifeforms, including humans, can no longer exist in that place.
    On the topic of school education, I would’ve thought this level of understanding and nuance would’ve been something many get before they leave school
    I listen to the people who have actually studied this, everything is changing, everything that provided the right conditions for the development of agriculture and complex human society over the last 10000 years or so
    The idiocy of climate denialists applied to fish kills on PB?! Fish have always died!

  12. Matt @ #3014 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:43 pm

    @GG: Jaysis, a whole pint of Creme de Menthe? That stuff’s sweeter than a lover’s kiss, but it’s got a kick like an angry mule! I mean, it’s not Vodka or anything, but it’s stronger than the majority of sweet liqueurs. Advocaat, Bailey’s (mmm, Bailey’s…), Tia Maria, you name it.

    Reminds me of when I was in America on student exchange, and being a mature-age student, was able to legally buy alcohol. So I bought a “handle” of Smirnoff for the Super Bowl night, for a bunch of American students had invited me to spectate with them. Not much of that left by the end of the night (although I was sharing with the others, I was also drinking at least half of all the vodka that left the bottle), so it shouldn’t surprise anyone that I ended up in hospital. Not bad enough to require stomach pumping, just to warrant keeping me under observation, but it was a timely notice that my drinking wasn’t quite as under-control as I’d thought!

    Needless to say, I haven’t gotten “properly” plastered since – and that was a decade ago. Four drinks is my absolute limit these days.

    It takes four drinks to hit a length, comrade!

  13. C@tmomma @ #3008 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:33 pm

    Don’t be a gormless git, P1.

    Formation of fossil fuels
    Crude oil, coal and gas are fossil fuels. They were formed over millions of years, from the remains of dead organisms:

    coal was formed from dead trees and other plant material
    crude oil and gas were formed from dead marine organisms

    https://www.bbc.com/bitesize/guides/z27thyc/revision/1

    Maybe instead of gasbagging about Maths and Physics, some revision of Chemistry and Earth Sciences is in order? 🙂

    If you think fossil fuels are a result of “Mass Extinction Events” then it is not I who am being a gormless git 🙁

  14. The idiocy of climate denialists applied to fish kills on PB?! Fish have always died!

    Don’t look at me. I mentioned Climate Change. 🙂

  15. Player One @ #3021 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:49 pm

    C@tmomma @ #3008 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:33 pm

    Don’t be a gormless git, P1.

    Formation of fossil fuels
    Crude oil, coal and gas are fossil fuels. They were formed over millions of years, from the remains of dead organisms:

    coal was formed from dead trees and other plant material
    crude oil and gas were formed from dead marine organisms

    https://www.bbc.com/bitesize/guides/z27thyc/revision/1

    Maybe instead of gasbagging about Maths and Physics, some revision of Chemistry and Earth Sciences is in order? 🙂

    If you think fossil fuels are a result of “Mass Extinction Events” then it is not I who am being a gormless git 🙁

    No, I didn’t say that. There is a cycle, as I alluded to to a r. However, mass extinction events , plus millions of years of heat and pressure can produce rich veins of fossil fuels eventually.

    Sorry, I thought you were able to join the dots yourself. 🙂

  16. @Everyone:

    I’ve been on PB for rather a while, if inconstantly, so I hope people will take this observation seriously.

    The level of toxicity in the comments here is very high, and has been growing over time. This has led to poster after poster being driven out of the PB commentariat over the years because they can’t handle the levels of abuse directed at them for not falling in-line with the groupthinking. Some of those people we’re better off without. Most of them were simply people who disagreed with us on some issues, and speaking for myself, I somewhat miss the ideological/viewpoint diversity.

    I personally hope that every Bludger will at least try to start 2019 with a concerted effort to tone it down – no matter how innocent of toxicity we think ourselves to be (everyone’s always the hero of their own story!). Because we’re already largely an ideological monoculture here – and I fear that the alternative is that we become an online club of angry old people who always agree, with the only thing keeping us together is a shared disdain for the ‘outside’ world.

    None of us want to be those people. So let’s try to avoid becoming those people. Please.

  17. Hmmmm…if the Govt were to make the cotton farmers on the upper Darling break open the levees that have installed so floods actually get to the rivers would be good public policy. Capturing as much water as they do is pure environmental vandalism that has to be having a negative effect on both the environment AND economy down stream.

  18. Doesn’t anyone ever think about their livers or their kidneys or their brains or their stomachs or their GIT, when they consume vast quantities of alcohol on a regular basis!?!

  19. Greensborough Growler @ #3017 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:46 pm

    Matt @ #3014 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:43 pm

    @GG: Jaysis, a whole pint of Creme de Menthe? That stuff’s sweeter than a lover’s kiss, but it’s got a kick like an angry mule! I mean, it’s not Vodka or anything, but it’s stronger than the majority of sweet liqueurs. Advocaat, Bailey’s (mmm, Bailey’s…), Tia Maria, you name it.

    Reminds me of when I was in America on student exchange, and being a mature-age student, was able to legally buy alcohol. So I bought a “handle” of Smirnoff for the Super Bowl night, for a bunch of American students had invited me to spectate with them. Not much of that left by the end of the night (although I was sharing with the others, I was also drinking at least half of all the vodka that left the bottle), so it shouldn’t surprise anyone that I ended up in hospital. Not bad enough to require stomach pumping, just to warrant keeping me under observation, but it was a timely notice that my drinking wasn’t quite as under-control as I’d thought!

    Needless to say, I haven’t gotten “properly” plastered since – and that was a decade ago. Four drinks is my absolute limit these days.

    It takes four drinks to hit a length, comrade!

    I had some home made ambrosia one evening. Only had a glass and a half, but it certainly had more kick than a bar of cadbury’s chocolate! Tasted like peach nectar and was very moreish. The chap that made it was an alternate life styler and had perfected it over several years. He followed what he described as a Roman recipe.

  20. Tom @ #3025 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:56 pm

    Greensborough Growler @ #3017 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:46 pm

    Matt @ #3014 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:43 pm

    @GG: Jaysis, a whole pint of Creme de Menthe? That stuff’s sweeter than a lover’s kiss, but it’s got a kick like an angry mule! I mean, it’s not Vodka or anything, but it’s stronger than the majority of sweet liqueurs. Advocaat, Bailey’s (mmm, Bailey’s…), Tia Maria, you name it.

    Reminds me of when I was in America on student exchange, and being a mature-age student, was able to legally buy alcohol. So I bought a “handle” of Smirnoff for the Super Bowl night, for a bunch of American students had invited me to spectate with them. Not much of that left by the end of the night (although I was sharing with the others, I was also drinking at least half of all the vodka that left the bottle), so it shouldn’t surprise anyone that I ended up in hospital. Not bad enough to require stomach pumping, just to warrant keeping me under observation, but it was a timely notice that my drinking wasn’t quite as under-control as I’d thought!

    Needless to say, I haven’t gotten “properly” plastered since – and that was a decade ago. Four drinks is my absolute limit these days.

    It takes four drinks to hit a length, comrade!

    I had some home made ambrosia one evening. Only had a glass and a half, but it certainly had more kick than a bar of cadbury’s chocolate! Tasted like peach nectar and was very moreish. The chap that made it was an alternate life styler and had perfected it over several years. He followed what he described as a Roman recipe.

    But, you lived to tell the tale. Well done, you!

  21. poroti @ #3013 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:37 pm

    Those cunning swine in the Coalition are covering all their bases 🙂

    After their………..

    If Labor’s reforms negative gearing it will see pensioners huddled around candles for warmth as they eat their dog food

    Josh ‘tonsure’ Frydenberg goes for

    Shorten will abandon negative gearing reforms, Frydenberg predicts

    https://outline.com/2cBWdq

    I’ve been told Josh has been ringing Chris Bowen for advice, since he became Treasurer. Chris told him to rack off after the first week. 🙂

  22. Douglas and Milko

    Learning depends on the teacher but also on the class and the environment, at least in my experience. I was a lucky student who went to Griffith University as its first intake of students. We had a stupidly high lecturer to student ratio that first year; young keen lecturers. I doubt any lecturers were older than 35. Of the hundred students who started Science with me I think 80 went on to complete honours.

    My story though is that one series of maths lectures ended after 8 weeks when our lecturer announced we had covered everything, and what did we wish to do for the remaining 4 weeks. We could continue and cover more material which would not be on the exam, spend the four weeks doing revision, or stop there. Everyone said, keep going! It was just fun to learn, and of course to do a bit of bragging.

    I later had the additional good fortune to travel to Berlin to visit family between my second and third year of study, having taken all the maths available as an undergraduate in science. One of my relatives was studying mathematics (not science) so I sat in on one of his lectures in advanced mathematics, in German. I could follow it easily and was surprised at how simple it seemed. (I’ve forgotten it all now, sadly.)

    The point being I suppose that I was lucky to be exposed to youth, talent, enthusiasm and a freedom to learn. It gave me a good deal of respect for our education system.

  23. Someone who looked every bit the Alternative Lifestyler, brought some magic mushrooms in home made Mead to a party of mine back in my Uni days. 🙂

  24. Matt @ #3022 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:53 pm

    @Everyone:

    I’ve been on PB for rather a while, if inconstantly, so I hope people will take this observation seriously.

    The level of toxicity in the comments here is very high, and has been growing over time. This has led to poster after poster being driven out of the PB commentariat over the years because they can’t handle the levels of abuse directed at them for not falling in-line with the groupthinking. Some of those people we’re better off without. Most of them were simply people who disagreed with us on some issues, and speaking for myself, I somewhat miss the ideological/viewpoint diversity.

    I personally hope that every Bludger will at least try to start 2019 with a concerted effort to tone it down – no matter how innocent of toxicity we think ourselves to be (everyone’s always the hero of their own story!). Because we’re already largely an ideological monoculture here – and I fear that the alternative is that we become an online club of angry old people who always agree, with the only thing keeping us together is a shared disdain for the ‘outside’ world.

    None of us want to be those people. So let’s try to avoid becoming those people. Please.

    matt,

    As someone who has been here from the beginning, the current snark is more oneupmanship than anything else.

    I can assure you the battles of yore were far more vindictive than today. Maybe the times have changed and the expectation is we should all love each other and sing Kumbayah.

    But one example is that WB jobbed out the American Election battle in 2008 and ended up being barred by the usurpers who’d conned him in to that decision.

    The tone of PB has actually improved since bemused was moved on.

    Yeah, it’s not perfect but it’s better than you think.

    Cheers.

  25. C@tmomma @ #3023 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:52 pm

    No, I didn’t say that. There is a cycle, as I alluded to to a r. However, mass extinction events , plus millions of years of heat and pressure can produce rich veins of fossil fuels eventually.

    Sorry, I thought you were able to join the dots yourself. 🙂

    You appear to have a misunderstanding of the origins of fossil fuels.

    Try this – http://www.barrettbellamyclimate.com/page40.htm

    Or this – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fossil_fuel

    Burning fossil fuels may cause Mass Extinction Events. But not the other way around.

  26. C@tmomma @ #3024 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:54 pm

    Doesn’t anyone ever think about their livers or their kidneys or their brains or their stomachs or their GIT, when they consume vast quantities of alcohol on a regular basis!?!

    What do you think of when you wake up in the morning, look out the window and know that’s the best you are going to feel all day!

  27. So Josh boy admits that their negative gearing and CGT policies make housing less affordable.
    .
    .
    Labor’s plans to abolish negative gearing as we know it and to increase the capital tax by 50 per cent would be disastrous for the economy and would send house prices lower.
    https://outline.com/2cBWdq

  28. Matt

    So basically if someone is not in the same faction of the same party you would like to see less “Burn the heretic !!!” ? 🙂

  29. Matt @ #2957 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 4:19 pm

    @yabba:

    For all that I agree with you on the substance of your comments re MDB mismanagement (make no mistake, I do), may I point out something?

    Touting your MENSA membership in an online forum comes across as just as snobbish as I would were I to reference my holding multiple degrees in my own comments. More, even, since MENSA membership comes as a result of an innate trait (extremely high IQ, as measured by any of several test designs), while my three degrees, one of them a Master’s, came from several years of hard work & study.

    Matt, you plainly only have knowledge of a tiny part of this story. Suffice to say, I believe that you have got the wrong end of the stick. A person on here, as part of a challenge to me to ‘prove’ the non-existence of god (I kid you not), said, straight out, that I was plainly stupid. I said I didn’t think I was, and quoted Mensa membership as possibly being an indication of this. I then told him that I was certain of the existence of god, as an idea in his mind, and in the minds of all true believers, but nowhere else.

    Since then, I have been pummelled mercilessly (this is perhaps a slight overstatement, but it has a nice resonance) about mentioning something which, to me, is just a fact. It is just something about me, like that I am bald, and a bit overweight, and have a beard, and drive a French car, and like surfing, and have been known to wear socks with sandals while bushwalking.

    It is quite amusing to me, that, every time I mention the word M****, there is a big pile on. You can’t really imagine what it is like to ‘be’ in my mind, just as I can’t imagine what it is like to ‘be’ in yours. As has been alluded to here, in the discussion about maths, a big problem I have found throughout my life is that I cannot understand why people don’t understand things which, to me, appear obvious. I am, therefore, not a good teacher. That, also, is just a fact. It has caused me grief at times. We had a fun conversation about this very topic at a M**** group evening meal at a lebbo restaurant in King St., Newtown, about four weeks ago.

    All the best. Yabba

  30. The tone of PB has actually improved since bemused was moved on.

    Yes, very much this.

    When was the last time William had to break up a scuffle between commenters?

  31. Matt
    Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 5:53 pm
    Comment #3024

    I’m not sure what to say about your comment.
    Using AR’s C+ and the block function from time to time and developing a rapid scrolling blindingly efficient scan for items of interest is probably the best we can do.

    Or —have a look later when the planet has revolved a little and the stars are more favourable to us.
    Or join me in a little country music with Luther Perkins style electric guitar

    ♫I grew up a-dreamin’ ♫♪of bein’ a cowboy
    And lovin’ the ♪♫cowboy♫ ways
    Pursuin’ the life ♫of my high ridin’♪ heroes
    I burned up my ♫childhood days

    I learned ♫all the rules of a modern ♪day drifter
    Don’t you hold on to ♫nothin’ too long
    Just ♫take what you need from the ♪ladies, then leave ♫them
    With the ♫words of a sad country ♪song

    This post, you will notice, has at least as little to do with anything as many other posts.
    Be kind to yourself and make your own arrangements. 😎

    Alternate song Life gets tedious don’t it ❓ 😇

  32. Matt – one problem appears to be a lack of considered communication at times – and there are those who deliberatedly stir the pot.

    I am happier ignoring some posters …otherwise the ‘personal’ nature of ripostes can get out of hand.

    I can see ‘frustration’ in a lot of posts where the deliberate pot-stirrers like to poke others in the eye to get a reaction. And of course when one’s argument is attacked or disparaged, many take it as a personal affront.

    It is the nature of human intercourse – especially when anonymity allows posters to go with their gut reaction and say what they initially think in reaction. I suspect, face-to-face, those posters would censor themselves more.

  33. I can see ‘frustration’ in a lot of posts where the deliberate pot-stirrers like to poke others in the eye to get a reaction. And of course when one’s argument is attacked or disparaged, many take it as a personal affront.

    Why are those with an alternate view to right-wing Labor partisans ‘potstirrers’ ?

  34. swamprat @ #2925 Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 – 3:36 pm

    I listened to a recent broadcast on RN ABC about a researcher into the red tailed cockatoo. There are only 1400 of them left. Their habitat has been destroyed and they can’t find tree hollows in which to breed.

    This is just one example of the extraordinary efficiency of Australian settlers in destroying the Country as quickly as possible.

    Our political system is unable or unwilling to address the environmental disaster that that the country faces and the great rate of extinctions that are coming.

    Of course our political system merely reflects the inadequate character of Australian settler society.

    Nat Parks distributed hundreds of Allocasuarina luehmannii the year before last in our area to get locals restoring their habitat. I’ve got some in, still juveniles. Lots of yellow tailed blacks, but no red tails, yet.

    http://www.redtail.com.au

    We’ve trashed this country, irrevocably. I posted on this a few days ago.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *