BludgerTrack: 51.1-48.9 to Labor

A closer look at the parties’ polling fortunes this term state-by-state, in lieu of much to go on in the way of new polling over Easter.

Easter has meant that only the regular weekly pollsters have reported this week, which means Essential Research and Morgan. The latter polls weekly but reports fortnightly, which I deal with by dividing each fortnightly result into two data points, each with half the published sample size. Neither Essential nor Morgan is radically off beam, so this week’s movements involve a correction after last week’s Greens outlier from Nielsen. This is not to say that Nielsen’s Greens surge was measuring nothing at all, the 17% result perhaps having been partly a reflection of it being the poll most proximate to the WA Senate election. In fact, both of the new results this week find the Greens at their highest level since at least the last election, and probably a good while earlier. Their 11% rating in Essential may not appear too spectacular, but it comes from what is the worst polling series for them by some distance – indeed, the only one the BludgerTrack model does not deem to be biased in their favour. Nonetheless, their rating in BludgerTrack this week comes off 1.8% on last week’s Nielsen-driven peak.

The dividend from the Greens’ loss has been divided between other parties in such a way as to produce essentially no change on two-party preferred. However, state relativities have changed in such a way as to cost Labor three seats and its projected majority, illustrating once again the sensitivity of Queensland, where a 0.8% shift has made two seats’ worth of difference. The New South Wales result has also shifted 0.6% to the Coalition, moving a third seat back into their column. Another change worth noting is a 2.4% move to Labor in Tasmania, which is down to a methodological change – namely the inclusion, for Tasmania only, of the state-level two-party preferred results that Morgan has taken to publishing. I had not been putting this data to use thus far, as the BludgerTrack model runs off primary votes and the figures in question are presumably respondent-allocated preferences besides. However, the paucity of data for Tasmania is such that I’ve decided it’s worth my while to extract modelled primary votes from Morgan’s figures, imperfect though they may be. The change has not made any difference to the seat projection, this week at least.

Finally, I’ve amused myself by producing primary vote and two-party preferred trendlines for each of the five mainland states, which you can see below. These suggest that not too much has separated New South Wales and Victoria in the changes recorded over the current term, leaving aside their very different starting points. However, whereas the Coalition has had a very gentle upward trend this year in Victoria and perhaps also New South Wales, their decline looks to have resumed lately in Queensland. Last week I noted that six successive data points I was aware of had Labor ahead on two-party preferred in Queensland, including five which are in the model and a Morgan result which is not. That’s now extended to eight with the availability of two further data points this week. The other eye-catching result in the charts below is of course from Western Australia, which clearly shows the effects of the Senate election with respect to both the Greens and Palmer United. The current gap between Labor and the Greens is such that the latter could well win lower house seats at Labor’s expense on these numbers – not that I recommend holding my breath waiting for that to happen.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,662 comments on “BludgerTrack: 51.1-48.9 to Labor”

  1. The media do two things:

    1. Deliver the message.

    2. Choose the message they wish to deliver.

    Unfortunately the majority of voters are stupid and ignorant and can be influenced in the way they vote based on the message sent by the media.

  2. Low road??

    I haven’t read the article but could he mean “low profile”?

    Attacks on the lies Abbott told to get elected seem pretty well unchallenged.

    The old “never interrupt your enemy when he’s making a mistake” theme can only survive for so long…

  3. PvO is doing his level best to try to criticize the government, so you have to forgive him for throwing in some random criticism of the ALP at the same time. It’s the only way he knows how to write something honest about the LNP.

    The ALP were roasted over “broken promises” (that by and large weren’t) in the last parliament, but now they’re supposed to let the LNP get away with out-and-out pre-election lies (“No medicare local will close!” “Unity ticket on education!” etc etc etc). I’m sure it makes some sort of sense in PvO’s mind.

    And the LNP “can’t live up to” promises made 7 months ago? Doesn’t that make you think that maybe they were lying their arses off 7 months ago?

  4. confessions 1292

    Most seem to complain about the revolving door that connects politicians with lobbyists … corruption of the Democratic process.

    The same goes for the journalists revolving door….. ABC’s Chris Uhlmann, stood for Osborne Independent ( conservative) Group in the ACT then joins the ABC…. political colours nailed to the mast
    At least Maxine McKew attempted to be A political prior to going into politics & had good grace not to come back afterwards
    Little wonder ABC has been a shambles since the likes of Uhlmann have been involved…. ie comment about Abbott’s “best ever week” while in China

  5. The military officers who supported it were thinking in terms of a jolly little cavalry charge and a few ships firing at one another. Yes a few thousand might die but then it would end. The trenches, tanks, planes (and Gallipoli) changed all that. The war became a blood bath.

    WWII was really just an extension of WWII because of the unbalanced nature of the Versailles treaty. Hitler (and Stalin)were almost inevitable results of the horror of WWI.

    Now MAD kept the peace for 40 years (unless you were in a proxy country ie Korea or Vietnam.

    The collapse of the USSR kept the peace for another 20 years because the USA was essentially unchallenged.

    However the world order has changed and we are NOW back in an era more like 1914 than 1964 or 2004. There are multiple power sources, jostling for supremacy.

    Instead of two great power blocks we have
    First the axis/alliance powers
    Russia (more powerful than WWI)
    Germany and Europe) (more powerful than WWI
    The UK ( much weaker than in 1914 and almost part of Europe
    France – irrelevant – see Europe
    Turkey – just about the same relative position as in 1914
    Poland – emerging as a player replacing Austria now part of Europe (EU)

    Then we have the New World powers
    The USA very powerful but on a downhill slope
    Australia/Canada still rich and strong – more powerful than in WWI

    But in addition we NOW have lots of emerging powers, some with nukes

    China obviously dominates but Japan, Indonesia, Brazil, are not to be ignored, together with the rogue nuke nations of Pakistan and Israel.

  6. lizzie

    Because way back when Tricky Dickey (?) “declared war on cancer” . Just as they declared “war” on drugs and poverty. Seppos have a pretty crap success rate on such “wars”

  7. Guytaur

    Sadly I think in ALL countries there is always a strong pro-war lobby. Many assume that they are the greatest military evah and it will “all be over by Xmas.”

    Mostly they are wrong, but political happenstance can lead to very foolish decisions.

  8. Seriously, had John Howard avoided the near certainty predicted recession during the GFC, he would have been hailed as the greatest PM of all time.

    Rudd got school halls waste and pink batts deaths.

    BASTARDS!

  9. [1291
    daretotread

    Now I think the USA would LUUUURRRRRVVVEEEE an excuse to renege on its debts to China and a mild sort of war (luke warm rather than hot) would give them the excuse to do so. I think much of their strategy is focused on this.]

    This is an absurd proposition. The US has no “debts” to China. China holds USD-denominated assets in its reserves, including Treasury Bonds. But this is not the same thing as the creation of loans from one country to another – not by any means. China bought the bonds and can sell them anytime they like. This is their main attraction. By the same token, it would be self-destructive for the US to repudiate its Bonds and, in any case, has no need to do this.

    The US will go on issuing new currency and new bonds, and other States will go on accumulating them for their own reserve purposes. China’s currency is also starting to be used as a reserve currency, as is ours. None of this means that loans are flowing between jurisdictions. It simply reflects the interchangeability of assets/liabilities in the global financial system, itself a generally smoothing and stabilising property. It is disruption to the exchangeability of assets (such as started to occur during the GFC) that invariably provokes a crisis.

    Of course, in China’s case, the fast growth of external reserves also reflects two other related phenomena: the very rapid pace of export-oriented industrialisation and the lopsided expansion of fixed capital investment at the expense of consumer spending. As their economy is re-structured away from a reliance on exports and capital investment – their domestic savings rate will fall – the rate of growth in foreign reserves will be able to slow.

    This has been happening over the last few years and is allied to a decline in US external imbalances as well.

    To suggest, as you implicitly are, that these processes will impel a war between China and the US is quite false. The opposite tendency is actually far more likely. Trade and investment-driven financial flows are deepening the structural engagement of China with other economies and increasing the need for strategic stability, rather than its opposite, strategic confrontation.

    The forces that are most likely to induce conflict are the same as they have always been – nationalism, populism, protectionism, cultural prejudice, militarist adventurism and political cynicism. These are the stock in trade of reactionaries everywhere.

  10. Guytaur

    The potential, if only you could agree all the time 🙂

    I would suggest to Labor that they actually challenge Murdoch Media.

    Why do you want the Coalition to win?

  11. Not only that, the Liberals and their Old Media cheer squad blame Labor for the budget position totally ignoring the stimulus that was necessary to save the economy.

    Old Media SUCKS!

  12. lizzie

    I remember when a popular AFL character died, the commentaries were along the line of ‘I thought that if anyone could beat cancer, XX could..”

    This idea that cancer is something which you can ‘beat’ by your sheer will power and tenacity actually denigrates cancer sufferers – if they’re not getting better, the implication is that it’s their fault, because they’re not trying hard enough.

    On a similar line, I’ve found it very sad when cancer patients have said brightly wtte of “I’ve got two years to live. That means I’ll be able to finish the garden, renovate the house….’

    I’ve never had the heart to point out that the two years aren’t two years of active life followed by a sudden death.

    The idea seems to be very persistent, given that I’ve struck it in a number of cancer sufferers.

  13. Kerry Chikarovski ethics…

    Sorry for length of post..

    The question I pose is why does the ABC feature Kerry, giving her credible exposure ( under balance pretext ), all the while she goes about scamming.

    ” BETTER known for her political consultancy, the former NSW Liberal leader, Kerry Chikarovski is about to reinvent herself as a weight-loss guru. However, the so-called “porn king” Con Ange, with whom she previously formed a weight-loss venture, Pharmaslim, is nowhere in sight. Chikarovski has started a new company, Chika Health, which is set to announce its first product – a “supplement” called Supprexxa – next month”

    http://newsstore.fairfax.com.au/apps/viewDocument.ac;jsessionid=4456EE291E5F5AD3FFC1EFE7D759875E?page=1&sy=afr&kw=One+and+of+and+the+and+last+and+liberal+and+Liberals&pb=none&dt=selectRange&dr=1month&so=relevance&sf=text&sf=headline&rc=10&rm=200&sp=0&clsPage=1&docID=SMH100326JLBBJ7HPI6D

    Exposed Chika scam 1?

    https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110907133600AAoQkXD

    Exposed Chika scam 2?

    http://www.itsmyhealth.com.au/news/chikarovski-pulls–hunger-buster–products

  14. [1314
    Centre

    Not only that, the Liberals and their Old Media cheer squad blame Labor for the budget position totally ignoring the stimulus that was necessary to save the economy.

    Old Media SUCKS!]

    The collective memory of life when Labor held office was of gradualist change within a stable environment.

    By contrast the LNP are promoting unexpected, disruptive change within an environment of elevated anxiety. They will also try to foment division and the rhetoric of both envy and sacrifice.

    Contentment and predictability have been replaced by resentment and doubt. It is very very unlikely the LNP will avoid a strong political backlash for trying this on. But, even so, they will try. Their ideological impulses will take them to conflict. They can’t resist.

  15. On “battling” cancer – I’m not sure what to make of that framing.

    On the one hand I believe there’s almost no evidence to support the contention that one’s attitude to the disease makes any great difference to outcomes.

    On the other hand the placebo effect is real. There is something about believing that something is effective. Clearly there are mechanisms that translate higher thought into disease fighting powers of some sort.

    And even if “being strong” and “fighting” the disease have no actual therapeutic effect, it perhaps gives some sufferers a sense of agency when they might otherwise feel entirely helpless.

    Clearly people shouldn’t get carried away with that type of thinking but it’s hard to see it doing much harm in moderation.

  16. Brilliant piece on Fraser in the Fairfax magazines in today’s Age and others re US alliance
    _________________________________
    They interview him and review his new book ,on the US Alliance called “Dangerous Allies ” …the title says it all

    He believes that the USA is a threat to world peace and to our very survival,with the neo-con policies of trying to impose a US style of living on the whole human race…global hegemony by force…and drones .

    Didn’t the Nazi once try the same thing

    ….and their willingness to bomb and threaten anyone …Islamic.,Russia.China to acheive this

    He says for example that the Pine Gap Base (which he wan.and which must make us a prime nucleur target on the Chinese and Russian lists ….we have always obeyed our imperial master…Gallipoli to Iraq and now we do it again(for what would be our final time )

    I find it interestinmg that in his new book he makes a critique of the alliance and the USA… of the kind that I and Tom Paine and several others(Daretotreat also)have made here in recent days…and have been roundly condemned for by some ignoirant posters…they ought to get Fraser book and she why they are so wrong

    read The Age mag today

  17. [Tony Abbott made a similar mistake when he did an interview with SBS the day before the election last year, an election he had already won. He said there would be “no cuts to education, no cuts to health, no changes to pensions, no changes to GST, no cuts to ABC or SBS”. It was an entirely unnecessary pledge to deliver on the eve of the election given the certainty of a Coalition win, and Abbott’s colleagues are scathing about the remarks.
    ]

    Even Bolt is saying Abbott shouldn’t make any cuts, including to the ABC, given his stupid and unnecessary promises. Basically Abbott panicked at the last minute and one he’s stuck. Bolt says he has to take those cuts to the next election.

  18. I’m late back to this but this comment last night is typical of what I was talking about re. MH-370:

    [BB,

    We do have one shred and that’s the acoustic pinger contacts which are quite definitely of the type that are attached to an aircraft black box.

    The chances of these signals coming from anything natural are non existant.

    The chances of these signals coming from anything other than that type of equipment are very small.

    And the chances that we just happened to have found a pinger that just happened to land in that patch of the ocean within the previous month, but wasn’t from said plane, are pretty damn small too.]

    The ultimate source of information about the “pinger” is Angus Houston via the newspapers.

    Almost everything in that post quoted above relies on assessments in newspapers and the media in general.

    However, the fact remains that the plane has not been found.

    There has been no evidence at all of a plane crash found.

    The search to date has produced a big, fat nothing. No wreckage, no oil slicks, no bodies… NOTHING.

    The history of the search is full of false leads and red herrings. All of which came to NOTHING. Zero. Zilch.

    Sure, the newspapers (and Abbott himself) did sensational beat ups on the “evidence” – one “expert”, David Mearns, even went so far as to say (wtte) “It’s been found, and we’ll hear about it in a few days. It’s just a matter of going through the motions now” – yet NOTHING has been found or revealed, and we haven’t heard from this guy since.

    It’s back to absolute square one, with the search area being re-extended and even the possibility of a landing somewhere or other now said to be part of the investigation again.

    The hype and sensationalism make it seem like there’s been “evidence”. They make it seem like there’s steady progress towards an inevitable, successful conclusion.

    But it only seems that way.

    Everything that has been “found”, discovered on beaches, seen floating in the water has turned out to be unrelated to MH-370.

    A comprehensive search in the area of interest has been completed by the autonomous submersible provided by the US Navy… and it has found… NOTHING.

    Of cpourse, the US Navy would have been the agency that shot the plane down (if it has indeed been shot down), but they wouldn’t do that, would they? OK, so they did it once before in the Persian Gulf, but they’d never do it again, right?

    Youse have to realise that all the hype about MH-370 was just that: hype (with a bit of supposedly informed speculation thrown in).

    I know it’s hard to cope with this. The “evidence” seemed so real. People were so sure. There must have been something to it.

    Nope. NOTHING at all.

    That pinger could have been anything, including a plant. It may as well have been, as it seems the area where the searchers thought it came from has no secondary evidence – I mean, actual wreckage – whatsoever, of a crashed plane.

    All of this “evidence” may have been put out with the best of intentions (I include Angus Houston here as an impeccably straight shooter), but the possibility must now surely be recognized that perhaps not everyone associated with this search or the disappearance of MH-370 has either come forward to admit knowledge of it, or has the best of intentions in this situation.

  19. Jackol

    [On the one hand I believe there’s almost no evidence to support the contention that one’s attitude to the disease makes any great difference to outcomes.
    ]

    That’s not true. There is good evidence that having an optimistic attitude to breast cancer improves your survival over having a defeatist attitude. It’s not a huge difference but it is there.

  20. sceptic:

    Some of the press gallery are so far inside their own bubble that they can’t see the wood for all the trees most days.

  21. Technically Abbott can make changes to pensions as long as they only kick in after the next election. I gather increasing the pension age wouldn’t take place in the next three years.

  22. BB

    Houston said the pinger noise had to be man made. I’m not sure if that’s true but he said that.

    I don’t think we are ever finding that plane.

  23. [Basically Abbott panicked at the last minute and one he’s stuck. Bolt says he has to take those cuts to the next election.]

    Jeez, when did Bolt get sensible?

  24. Incidentally, MH-370 might well be an unsuitable topic for discussion on a psephology thread, EXCEPT for the fact that Abbott forced the assembled parliament of the Commonwealth to go through the ridiculous farce of a Condolence Motion simply because the plane was suggested to have crashed a couple of thousand kilometres from the coast of Western Australia, and the RAAF was co-ordinating the search.

    He big-noted himself, got it in all the news feeds that somehow he had a “secret” that he could only tell to the Chinese Premier personally. Within a couple of days, it was as if he was directing the search himself, from Beijing, with Angus Houston’s name completely omitted from all the stories.

    I couldn’t find anyone who didn’t think he’d made a complete goose of himself (anecdotal, yes), and marked him down because of it.

    And that has a definite potential for (adverse) psephological outcomes. Abbott went down in the polls after his FTA junket tour of Asia. His antics over MH-370 could well have been part of that. The possibility is certainly worth discussing here.

    He tried to play the Australian public with mock heroics, and got slam dunked himself.

  25. [Technically Abbott can make changes to pensions as long as they only kick in after the next election. I gather increasing the pension age wouldn’t take place in the next three years.]
    And technically the carbon tax is actually an emissions trading scheme that has a fixed price.

    This technicality won’t stop us from calling Abbott a lying liar who lies.

  26. [1326
    confessions

    Basically Abbott panicked at the last minute and one he’s stuck. Bolt says he has to take those cuts to the next election.

    Jeez, when did Bolt get sensible?]

    The Tories know the public will react very badly to unexpected, unnecessary change and to broken promises. Much as they may not like it, their priority now will be to defend their turf, to hold onto office.

    Inevitably, divisions are opening up between those who have been sucked in by Hockey’s call for changes (like PvO) and those who simply want power (like Bolt). They are riding for a fall, imo. If they make the case for change, they are sort of duty-bound to try to institute it. If they don’t try to achieve changes, they will instead be making out the case for their own impotence. Those who simply want to hold office have an easier mission: they just have to defend the status quo.

    Their lack of preparation for office is already showing up: they do not know what to do, or, if they have some semblance of an idea, have no strategy for action. They are likely to implode in their own cynicism and ineptitude.

  27. Diog –

    It’s not a huge difference but it is there.

    Fair enough, that sounds like a good enough reason to me.

    I may have been thinking of those studies of the efficacy of prayer (ie none), which I would have thought should be similar (unless there are more complex interactions going on between the sufferer and their faith through the course of their disease!)

  28. [Their lack of preparation for office is already showing up: they do not know what to do, or, if they have some semblance of an idea, have no strategy for action.]

    This has been evident for years now. I’m not as optimistic as you that they’ll implode.

  29. I absolutely agree about using the term ‘battling cancer’. I’ve been through cancer twice, I got better after the second bout and haven’t had any problems for over 20 years now. I never thought I was having a battle, I thought of it as getting well.

    One thing that annoys me is the focus that has been given to my health by even the most casual acquaintances, once they learn I have had this illness. The first thing I’m always asked is ‘How ARE you?’ You have to say ‘Fine, thank you’ or ‘Brilliantly well’ or something like that, because no-one wants to know if you are sick in any way, but they believe it’s what they should ask. I sometimes wonder if it’s patronising behaviour, a way to rub it in a bit, you’ve had this illness and they haven’t so you must be about to fall in a heap. Just for once I’d love to be asked ‘So, what have you been up to lately?’ instead of the inevitable health question.

    So – if you are about to speak with someone who once had cancer, or any other serious illness, please, don’t start by asking ‘How are you?’ Do not define anyone by an illness.

    And one more thing – why does everyone expect cancer patients to be ‘normal’, to be happy and, if they are women, to wear a wig if their chemo has temporarily taken away their hair? It always seemed to me that people could not cope with obvious signs of this illness and needed you to appear ‘normal’ so they felt better. I decided people could damn well cope with me as I was. If I looked crook or if my headscarves offended them then tough, I was putting all my energy into getting better, not into faffing about with wigs and makeup. My opinion on a certain group that makes female cancer patients muck around slapping on mnakeup and wigs so they will ‘feel better’ is a whole new rant for another time.

  30. I tuned in to 2GB the night O’Farrell resigned and Bolt said then, that Abbott could not break a promise after BOFs resignation. He was clear and specific in linking the two things, going so far to say Abbott should cut funding to the ABC and break the promise, but now that BOF had set the bar high, it is not possible for Abbott to do it.

    For Bolt the only thing stopping Abbott from breaking more promises is the example set by BOF and breaking a promise now will cause a backlash onto Abbott.

    It’s an interesting moral world that Bolt inhabits.

  31. confessions@1334

    I think they are already starting to show signs of wear and tear. So far, they have achieved precisely nothing more than to irritate, disappoint and create hostility.This is even before they get to their first budget, which will be a shocker. They will have to deal with a capricious Senate and a sullen electorate…and Abbott is a Fool.

    Let’s see…I’m hopeful… 🙂

  32. Briefly

    In all practical ways the USA is in debt to China – call it bonds or loans or whatever, the reality is that China bought up US Bonds giving them a “Loan” through which they fund their military expansion.

    A war of any kind might give the USA the excuse to crash the bonds.

    Now of course I believe all the sane heads in the USA and China want trade not war, but I am seeing some very worrying signs. What you are saying was true five years ago but I am NOT quite sure now.

    The following events/strategies have changed the picture:
    1. Tail end of the Howard years we got the “encircle China strategy, with the USA cosying up to India, Vietnam, Pakistan and more recently Myanmar. Effectively China is now surrounded by nations allied to its major strategic threat and/or economic rival. (
    2. The US Darwin base, which effectively blocks China’s alternative sealane, assuming the Straits of Malacca are closed (highly likely)
    3. China has rapidly expanded its submarine fleet such that it MAY actually have fire power SUPERIORITY in the Pacific
    4. China has embarked on a program of building aircraft carriers
    5. The Russian bear has reawakened and recovered its strength
    6. The image of the USA has taken a beating – GFC, Katrina, Ire important.aq Afghanistan, the debt ceiling debacle, all make the USA seem weak on the world stage. Psychology can be important.

  33. [1338
    daretotread

    Briefly

    In all practical ways the USA is in debt to China]

    This is just mistaken. The USA is not in debt to China. Not at all.]

  34. Dio
    [Basically Abbott panicked at the last minute and one he’s stuck.]
    Panic? They made a whole bunch of promises they never intended to keep. It wasn’t panic.

  35. Fraser’s assessment.

    [In an attack on the Labor-Coalition consensus, Mr Fraser said Australia’s military was now so entwined with the giant US war machine that, functionally, the country had ceded decisions about what conflicts we eventually become entangled in.

    Mr Fraser said the US had a record of embarking on disastrous military adventures, from Vietnam (which he originally supported) to Iraq and Afghanistan, and it was increasingly likely that its next military folly would drag in Australia.

    He said a progressive blurring of the lines of sovereign independence could be traced back to the collapse of the Soviet Union, which should have been the moment when Australia marked out its own strategic persona.]

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/malcolm-fraser-warns-australia-risks-war-with-china-unless-us-military-ties-cut-back-20140425-zqz8p.html#ixzz2zy7Nj2iG

  36. Jackol

    [Fair enough, that sounds like a good enough reason to me.

    I may have been thinking of those studies of the efficacy of prayer (ie none), which I would have thought should be similar (unless there are more complex interactions going on between the sufferer and their faith through the course of their disease!)]

    Studies for other cancers like head and neck haven’t demonstrated a difference depending on attitude so there probably isn’t much of an effect.

    It’s also a double edged sword. If a patient is told that attitude improves prognosis, that means every time they get despondent or negative they feel extra bad because they think their sad affect is also making their prognosis worse.

  37. http://www.netgear.com.au/compare.aspx

    ok YOU Tech Guys /Girls eg Bemused etc I have to get an extender down to these two Have an AsusPF701T tablet(android) can get either on line but think I will go for the 3500 one seems much better and can get it online from Sydney for $85(promo) delivered to me only $7 more than the 3000 Have tried everything but have been told by Asus will need an extender, any input appreciated.

    Look as as though only have to plug it into a power point on say second floor and hit the 2 switches on the modem (router) and extender and will work or am I being hopeful? The modem on bottom floor and I want it in the bedrooms on third floor, like my old tablet could do without an extender

  38. Phil

    [I tuned in to 2GB the night O’Farrell resigned and Bolt said then, that Abbott could not break a promise after BOFs resignation. He was clear and specific in linking the two things, going so far to say Abbott should cut funding to the ABC and break the promise, but now that BOF had set the bar high, it is not possible for Abbott to do it.

    For Bolt the only thing stopping Abbott from breaking more promises is the example set by BOF and breaking a promise now will cause a backlash onto Abbott.]

    That is unquestionably true. The ONLY reason Bolt says Abbott cannot break those promises is because he thinks Abbott might get tossed out next election if he breaks a bunch of promises.

  39. “Government parliamentary secretary Josh Frydenberg said the Liberal Party was a party of deregulation which encouraged competition.”

    [Labor says the government will break another election promise if it pursues plans to open $6 billion of university funding to private sector competition.
    Labor higher education spokesman Kim Carr said that would mean less money for students of existing institutions, which the government clearly promised it wouldn’t do before the election.

    News Ltd newspapers have reported that the government is considering opening the $6 billion Commonwealth Grants Scheme to private institutions and non-university institutions such as TAFE colleges.]

    Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/abbott-breaking-another-promise-on-university-funding-labor-20140426-zqzzs.html#ixzz2zy8AYiHU

  40. DN

    For whatever reason, Abbott was prepared to say or do absolutely anything in the last week.

    Personally I think he panicked at the thought he might lose.

  41. A US academic looks at the way the western corporations want to plunder the Ukraine in the name of debt repayment
    __________________________

    The EU monoplies want to steal the natural resouces of the Ukraine as a part of the debt settlement which is weighing down the economy there
    This is not possible in Russia where the state has a majority share in all major resources industries.or the multi-nationals would have got a hold of the Russian gas industry as they have in Australia

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