Call of the board: Sydney (part two)

A second, even closer look at the electoral lay of the land in the Sydney region at the May 18 federal election.

On reflection, my previous post, intended as the first in a series of “Call of the Board” posts reviewing in detail the result of the May 18 election, was deficient in two aspects. The first is that patterns in the results estimated by my demographic model were said to be “difficult to discern”, which can only have been because I didn’t look hard enough. In fact, the results provide evidence for remarkably strong incumbency effects. Of the 12 Liberals defending their seats in the Sydney area, all but Tony Abbott outperformed the modelled estimate of the Liberal two-party vote, by an average of 4.0%. Of the 15 Labor members, all but two (Julie Owens in Parramatta and Anne Stanley in Werriwa) outperformed the model, the average being 3.4%.

The other shortcoming of the post was that it did not, indeed, call the board – a now-abandoned ritual of election night broadcasting in which the results for each electorate were quickly reviewed in alphabetical order at the end of the night, so that nobody at home would feel left out. You can find this done for the Sydney seats over the fold, and it will be a feature of the Call of the Board series going forward.

Banks (Liberal 6.3%; 4.8% swing to Liberal): After winning the seat for the Liberals in 2013 for the first time since its creation in 1949, David Coleman has now scored three wins on the trot, the latest by comfortably his biggest margin to date: 6.3%, compared with 2.8% in 2013 and 1.4% in 2016. In a post-election account for the Age/Herald, Michael Koziol reported that Labor’s national secretariat and state branch were at loggerheads over the seat late in the campaign, with the former wishing to devote resources to the seat, and the latter recognising that they “didn’t stand a chance”.

Barton (Labor 9.4%; 1.1% swing to Labor): Located around the crossover point where the inner urban swing to Labor gave way to the outer urban swing to Liberal, Barton recorded a slight swing to Labor that was perhaps boosted by a sophomore effect for incumbent Linda Burney.

Bennelong (Liberal 6.9%; 2.8% swing to Labor): A fair bit has been written lately about Labor’s struggles with the Chinese community, particularly in New South Wales, but that did not stop the nation’s most Chinese electorate recording a reasonably solid swing to Labor. This perhaps reflected the quality of Labor’s candidate, neurosurgeon Brian Owler, but was also typical of a seat where Malcolm Turnbull had played well in 2016, when it swung 2.8% to the Liberals.

Berowra (Liberal 15.6%; 0.8% swing to Labor): Most of this outer northern Sydney seat is in the outer part of the zone that swung to Labor, barring a few lightly populated regions out north and west. However, Liberal member Julian Leeser is what I will call a half-sophomore – a first-term incumbent, but one who succeeded a member of the same party (in this case Philip Ruddock), so there was no reversal of the sitting member advantage. So the 0.8% swing to Labor is about par for the course.

Blaxland (Labor 14.7%; 4.8% swing to Liberal): The anti-Labor swing suffered by Jason Clare was fairly typical for Sydney’s south-west.

Bradfield (Liberal 16.6%; 4.5% swing to Labor): Apart from the exceptional cases of Warringah and Wentworth, this was the biggest swing against the Liberals in New South Wales. However, given it was only fractionally lower in neighbouring North Sydney, that’s unlikely to be a reflection on sitting member Paul Fletcher, instead reflecting the electorate’s affluence and proximity to the city. The seat also recorded the state’s biggest swing to the Greens, at 2.0%.

Chifley (Labor 12.4%; 6.8% swing to Liberal): Ed Husic suffered Labor’s biggest unfavourable swing in Sydney (and the second biggest in the state after Hunter), after enjoying the second biggest favourable swing in 2016 (after Macarthur).

Cook (Liberal 19.0%; 3.6% swing to Liberal): As noted in the previous post, Scott Morrison enjoys the biggest Liberal margin in New South Wales relative to what might be expected from the electorate’s demographic composition. Only part of this can be explained by a prime ministership effect, as his 3.6% swing ranked only twelfth out of the 47 seats in New South Wales.

Dobell (Labor 1.5%; 3.3% swing to Liberal): The two seats on the Central Coast behaved similarly to most of suburban Sydney in swinging solidly to the Liberals, but there was enough padding on the Labor margin to save Emma McBride in Dobell, a marginal seat that lands Labor’s way more often than not.

Fowler (Labor 14.0%; 3.5% swing to Liberal): Labor’s Chris Hayes suffered a swing unremarkable by the standards of western Sydney, or perhaps slightly at the low end of average.

Grayndler (Labor 16.3% versus Greens; 0.5% swing to Labor): As illustrated in the previous post, Anthony Albanese’s personal popularity continues to define results in Grayndler, where the Labor margin is well out of proportion to demographic indicators. Whereas the Greens hold the largely corresponding state seats of Balmain and Newtown, in Grayndler they struggle to harness enough of the left-of-centre vote to finish ahead of the Liberals. They just managed it on this occasion, as they had previously in 2010 and 2016, outpolling the Liberals 22.6% to 21.8% on the primary vote, narrowing to 24.2% to 23.8% after the exclusion of three other candidates. Albanese cleared 50% of the primary vote for the first time since 2007, helped by a smaller field of candidates than last time, and had a locally typical 1.5% two-party swing against the Liberals.

Greenway (Labor 2.8%; 3.5% swing to Liberal): The swing against Labor’s Michelle Rowland was typical for middle suburbia, and roughly reversed the swing in her favour in 2016.

Hughes (Liberal 9.8%; 0.5% swing to Liberal): Craig Kelly did rather poorly to gain a swing of only 0.5% – as a careful look at the results map shows, the boundary between Hughes and Cook marks a distinct point where Labor swings turn to Liberal ones. The demographic model suggests Kelly to be the third most poorly performing Liberal incumbent out of the 13 in the Sydney area, ahead of Tony Abbott (Warringah) and Lucy Wicks (Robertson).

Kingsford Smith (Labor 8.8%; 0.2% swing to Labor): It was noted here previously that Matt Thistlethwaite strongly outperforms the demographic model, but the near status quo result on this occsion did little to contribute to that. This seat was roughly on the geographic crossover point between the Labor swings of the city and the Liberal swings of the suburbs.

Lindsay (LIBERAL GAIN 5.0%; 6.2% swing to Liberal): One of five seats lost by Labor at the election, and the only one in Sydney. Like the others, Lindsay was gained by Labor in 2016, with Emma Husar scoring a 1.1% margin from a 4.1% swing. This was more than reversed in Husar’s absence, with Liberal candidate Melissa McIntosh prevailing by 5.0%. The 6.2% swing against Labor was the biggest in the Sydney area, and produced a Liberal margin comparable to Jackie Kelly’s strongest.

Macarthur (Labor 8.4%; 0.1% swing to Labor): To repeat what was said in the previous post: Labor strongly outpolled the demographic model in Macarthur, a seat the Liberals held from 1996 until 2016, when Russell Matheson suffered first an 8.3% reduction in his margin at a redistribution, and then an 11.7% swing to Labor’s Michael Freelander, a local paediatrician. The swing to Labor, tiny though it was, ran heavily against the trend of urban fringe seats across the country. In addition to Freelander’s apparent popularity, this probably reflected a lack of effort put into the Liberal campaign compared with last time, as the party narrowly focused on its offensive moves in Lindsay and Macquarie and defensive ones in Gilmore and Reid. Macarthur was one of six seats in New South Wales contested by One Nation, whose 8.6% seemed to be drawn equally from Labor and Liberal.

Mackellar (Liberal 13.2%; 2.5% swing to Labor): Jason Falinski’s northern beaches seat participated in the swing to Labor in inner and northern Sydney, though in this case it was a fairly modest 2.5%, perhaps reflecting Falinski’s half-sophomore effect. A 12.2% vote for independent Alice Thompson caught most of the combined 14.9% for three independents in 2016, leaving the large parties’ vote shares little changed.

Macquarie (Labor 0.2%; 2.0% swing to Liberal): A sophomore surge for Labor member Susan Templeman surely made the difference here, with the 2.0% swing to the Liberals being below the outer urban norm, and just short of what was required to take the seat.

McMahon (Labor 6.6%; 5.5% swing to Liberal): The swing against Chris Bowen was well at the higher end of the scale and, typically for such a result, followed a strong swing the other way in 2016, in this case of 7.5%. This was among the six seats in New South Wales contested by One Nation, whose 8.3% contributed to a 7.4% primary vote swing against Bowen, and perhaps also to the size of the two-party swing.

Mitchell (Liberal 18.6%; 0.8% swing to Liberal): Where most safe Liberal seats in Sydney were in the zone of inner and northern Sydney that swung to Labor, Mitchell is far enough west to encompass the crossover point where Labor swings gave way to Liberal ones. This translated into a modest 0.8% swing to Liberal member Alex Hawke, and very little change on the primary vote.

North Sydney (Liberal 9.3%; 4.3% swing to Labor): Trent Zimmerman’s seat caught the brunt of the inner urban swing to Labor, the 4.3% swing to Labor being the state’s fourth highest after Warringah, Wentworth and Bradfield, the latter of which just shaded it. Labor managed a hefty 8.3% gain on the primary vote, largely thanks to the absence of Stephen Ruff, who polled 12.8% as an independent in 2016. The one independent on this occasion was serial candidate Arthur Chesterfield-Evans, a former Democrats member of the state upper house, who managed only 4.4%.

Parramatta (Labor 3.5%; 4.2% swing to Liberal): Parramatta marks the crossover point where the Liberal swing in western Sydney begins, producing a 4.2% swing against Labor’s Julie Owens that only partly unwound the 6.4% swing she picked up in 2016.

Reid (Liberal 3.2%; 1.5% swing to Labor): The Liberals maintained their remarkable record in this seat going back to 2013, when they won it for the first time in the seat’s history, by limiting the swing to Labor to a manageable 1.5%. While the 3.2% margin is only modestly higher than that predicted by the demographic model, it was achieved despite the departure of two-term sitting member Craig Laundy, who is succeeded by Fiona Martin.

Robertson (Liberal 4.2%; 3.1% swing to Liberal): Similarly to neighbouring Dobell, the Central Coast seat of Robertson swung 3.1% to the Liberals, in this case boosting the margin of Lucy Wicks.

Sydney (Labor 18.7%; 3.4% swing to Labor): The inner urban swing to Labor added further padding to Tanya Plibersek’s margin. The Greens continue to run third behind the Liberals, who outpolled them by 26.6% to 18.1%. As is the case in Grayndler, this presumably reflects local left-wing voters’ satisfaction with the incumbent.

Warringah (INDEPENDENT GAIN 7.2% versus Liberal): Zali Steggall took a big chunk out of the big party contenders in recording 43.5% of the primary vote, but the largest of course came from Tony Abbott, down from 51.6% to 39.0%. Abbott won four booths around Forestville at the northern end of the electorate, but it was otherwise a clean sweep for Steggall. She particularly dominated on the coast around Manly, by margins ranging from 10% to 18%.

Watson (Labor 13.5%; 4.1% swing to Liberal): In a familiar suburban Sydney pattern, Tony Burke had an 8.8% swing in his favour from 2016 unwound by a 4.1% swing to the Liberals this time.

Wentworth (Liberal 1.3% versus Independent): Listed as a Liberal retain in a spirit of consistently comparing results from the 2016 election, this was of course a Liberal gain to the extent that it reversed their defeat at the hands of independent Kerryn Phelps at last October’s by-election. There was an unblemished divide between the northern end of the electorate, encompassing the coast north of Bondi and all but the westernmost part of the harbourside, where the Liberals won the two-candidate vote, and the southern end of the electorate, where Phelps did. As noted in the previous post, there was a swing to Labor of 7.9% on the two-party preferred count, but this was testament more than anything to Malcolm Turnbull’s local support.

Werriwa (Labor 5.5%; 2.7% swing to Liberal): A half-sophomore effect for Labor’s Anne Watson may have helped limit the swing here in this outer suburban seat.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,936 comments on “Call of the board: Sydney (part two)”

  1. guytaur:

    [‘Labor has already said they will pass it. Thus the Crossbench won’t stick their necks out. The numbers to amend won’t be there.

    I would like to be wrong on this but we have seen the history’]

    See my reply to Barney. I think CA has some misgiving about certain aspects of the bill. If it does pass the parliament, it would certainly be open to a HC challenge.

  2. As is guytaur, adrian, mundo, LvT, bakunin, clem attlee, Quoll, Firefox, WeWantPaul.
    Have I forgotten anyone?

    Yes.
    Yourself. BW. Briefly.

    Half the problem is the bickering within the left of politics. Divided we fall, companeros.

  3. Doyley

    Dutton will use his new powers against Labor he has form.
    Selling out your base to avoid being wedged is called rolling over.
    See how Daniel Andrews did it.

    He fought. He did not lie over and take it.
    Back your words with action. Have some pride. FFS.

  4. …they can’t come to the opposition seeking cooperation on other procedural matters.

    Ooooo being tough on………………………”procedural matters” what bwavery .

  5. BiM and MD

    Re-posted from earlier this morning (info from The Guardian)

    —————

    KK – “If you will, this is the beginning, unfortunately, of the compact of a committee which has worked very well and unlike any other committee, has produced bipartisan recommendations that have improved every piece of national security legislation.”

    Labor did not take on all of the committee’s recommendations on the telecommunications data retention bill, which the government is using as precedent for not taking all of the recommendations on this one.

    Labor is supporting the bill, despite its concerns. One of those being that the minister is the power which will get to decide who the temporary exclusion order applies to, not, as it is in the UK, on which the Australian laws are based on, a retired judge, or independent judiciary member. Peter Dutton says that would undermine the intent of the bill. Keneally says the UK, which has had these laws since 2015, has not found that.

    But again – it doesn’t matter, because the laws have bipartisan support to go through the parliament.

  6. ‘lizzie says:
    Wednesday, July 24, 2019 at 11:28 am

    @Bakes_1
    ·
    13h
    To the world.
    We citizens in the UK did not vote for Boris Johnson
    The fucking Conservative Party did
    Yes we have a fuckwit with weird hair now too’

    But can 90,000 rich old white fogeys possibly be wrong?

  7. Peg
    Keeping going! Doing well. You have Morrison is quaking in his racist shoes.
    Indigenous kids will be especially pleased at your thought leadership in this space!

  8. cat,

    Thank you for your post. Spelling is not one of my strong points especially when I am on a roll. As you can also see I have no idea how to spell Don Quoitox ! I have been relying too much on the “ vibe” hoping people would not notice to address my shortcomings but now I have been caught out I will try harder ! ( smiley face ).

    As Steve777 pointed out to me earlier this week when he tried to address a post to me autocorrect changed my name to Donkey. I reflected at the time it was perhaps a result of autocorrect reading too many of my posts.

    Cheers.

  9. guytaur says:
    Wednesday, July 24, 2019 at 11:32 am

    Doyley

    Dutton will use his new powers against Labor he has form.
    Selling out your base to avoid being wedged is called rolling over.
    See how Daniel Andrews did it.

    He fought. He did not lie over and take it.
    Back your words with action. Have some pride. FFS.

    What he’ll start banning Opposition members from returning to Australia when they travel OS? 😆

  10. Mexican

    Palasczuk won with a little itty bitty number of members.
    Kept Newman to one term. She did not do it voting for Newman’s policies.

  11. The Guardian

    The home affairs minister Peter Dutton was asked on Sky about the commonwealth ombudsman’s report which revealed a litany of breaches of metadata laws including the Western Australian police obtained invalid warrants targeting journalists and ACT police accessed data 116 times without proper authorisation.

    Who voted for these laws?

  12. Barney

    Maybe. After all with these powers passing we haven’t adjusted to exactly how much democracy has been lost.
    We don’t call Dutton the Tuberfurher for nothing.

  13. Guytaur
    I doubt the average Queenslander cared how the 7 voted. At this stage of the election cycle the only people watching are political types and people wanting certain policies delivered.

  14. Mexican

    I am not saying Palasczuk is a model to follow. After all it’s Queensland State Laws that French Journalist was arrested under.

    As seen on the 7:30 Report last night.

  15. ‘Rex Douglas says:
    Wednesday, July 24, 2019 at 11:37 am

    Boerwar @ #1657 Wednesday, July 24th, 2019 – 11:35 am

    Peg
    Keeping going! Doing well. You have Morrison is quaking in his racist shoes.
    Indigenous kids will be especially pleased at your thought leadership in this space!’

    Sure enough Rex follows this up by avoiding personal snarking and with a determined lengthy and well-driected tirade against Morrison and Dutton for incarcerating Bookhani for life. They are, after all, ridiculously easy targets for left-minded folk.

    Good on you, Rex!

    At this rate the Greens will make a great contribution to getting rid of the ScumCo!

  16. Mexican

    It’s a very simple thing. You can’t hold the government to account. That is provide Oversight if you keep voting for more powers to keep things secret.

  17. ‘Pegasus says:
    Wednesday, July 24, 2019 at 11:38 am

    The Guardian

    The home affairs minister Peter Dutton was asked on Sky about the commonwealth ombudsman’s report which revealed a litany of breaches of metadata laws including the Western Australian police obtained invalid warrants targeting journalists and ACT police accessed data 116 times without proper authorisation.

    Who voted for these laws?’

    That’s the idea, Peg! Morrison did. Good work! You are settling into our Three Year Murder Morro campaign seamlessly.

  18. The revolving door:

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/jul/24/more-than-half-of-lobbyists-have-worked-within-australian-government-study-finds

    About 56% of lobbyists previously worked within government, according to as-yet unpublished research examining the revolving door of Australian politics.
    :::
    A study currently under way at the Australian National University suggests the movement between government and lobbying is far more significant than previously thought.
    :::
    But the lobbying rules – much like the ministerial standards – are weak, go almost completely unenforced, and are not subject to independent oversight.

    Under the watch of successive governments of both political stripes.

  19. My amendment for oil & gas companies to fund Future Drought Fund just got voted down by Gov & Labor. Why do Gov & Labor want to rip $3.9 billion out of infrastructure and transport, instead of making the industry that causes drought help pay to clean up their own mess? #greens— Janet Rice (@janet_rice) July 24, 2019

    And now only #greens supporting @larissawaters amendment to stop mining companies from getting free water while farmers are struggling with drought. All the other parties voting with the miners once again— Janet Rice (@janet_rice) July 24, 2019

  20. When the Republic of Ireland’s border is the EU’s border then the EU will have a huge say in what the border will look like. If the UK’s border is the same border as the NI border then the UK will have a huge say in what the border will look like.

    The Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland could decide pragmatically that it is better to maintain a soft border by their own agreement, and seek the forgiveness of the EU rather than seek permission. If the EU doesn’t like it, what are they going to do? Send troops into Ireland to force them to have a hard border?

    The claim that it is intrinsically impossible for the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland to make their own decision is not true. It would be unorthodox and unexpected for them to decide on a soft border without the EU’s consent, but it is open to them if they decide that it is better than the alternative.

    The EU will only have as much say in the matter as Ireland and Northern Ireland agree to give them. Deciding to make the whole thing hinge on the EU’s consent is a voluntary, self-imposed constraint that can be removed at any time.

  21. guytaur says:
    Wednesday, July 24, 2019 at 11:39 am

    Barney

    Maybe. After all with these powers passing we haven’t adjusted to exactly how much democracy has been lost.
    We don’t call Dutton the Tuberfurher for nothing.

    Yep and the Courts would support him¿

    You certainly have a unique way of thinking about things. 😆

  22. Richard Denniss – The attacks on Bob Brown for opposing a windfarm are exhausting and hypocritical

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/jul/24/the-attacks-on-bob-brown-for-opposing-a-windfarm-are-exhausting-and-hypocritical

    It’s not clear why some species of bird are so important to conservatives and others are inconsequential. The fact that an environmentalist might ever oppose a windfarm is one of the most exciting things to happen to the rightwing commentariat since Yassmin Abdel-Magied used her freedom of speech to defy political correctness and criticise Anzac Day.
    :::
    But the confused attacks on Brown haven’t just come from the right and they haven’t just focused on the importance, or lack of importance, of protecting birds. Some have criticised him for mentioning that the project would be foreign-owned (xenophobia), for caring only about Tasmania (nimbyism) and for speaking out about a topic that was bound to fire up the right (the naivety!). It is amazing how many people one short opinion piece can excite.

    Pointing out that the proposed windfarm would be foreign-owned isn’t xenophobic – it’s a key part of any democratic or planning discussion about who bears the costs and who receives the benefits. I’ve sat in court and argued on the side of small communities who say that foreign-owned coalmines should be opposed on the basis that their town will incur most of the costs of noise and dust pollution, while most of the benefits will accrue to people who live thousands of kilometres away. No one has, yet, called me xenophobic. As for criticising a former senator for Tasmania for speaking out on behalf of Tasmania, I’ll let others puzzle over that one.
    :::
    There are better and worse places to build coalmines, wind turbines, high-rise buildings and nuclear waste dumps. Australians not only have the right, but should be encouraged, to participate in such debates.
    :::
    There will always be local concerns associated with the construction of new freeways, new coalmines, new high-rise towers and yes, new wind and solar farms. Democracy doesn’t promise us that everyone will always be happy but it should promise us that everyone has a voice in the decisions that affect them.

    It’s not Bob Brown and the other environmentalists concerned about the Robbins Island windfarm who are being hypocrites – it’s those on the right who have ignored community and environmental concerns for decades when freeways and high-rise housing were killing the birds and pissing off the locals, and who are now feigning concern about those very same issues.

  23. Barney

    See Turkey. This is how they lost their Democracy. It’s Boiling Frog Syndrome. Increasing secrecy for government is the first sign of the establishment of authoritarian regimes.

  24. The attacks on Bob Brown for opposing a windfarm are exhausting and hypocritical

    As exhausting and hypocritical as…Bob Brown opposing a windfarm (because of aesthetics and birds)?

  25. guytaur says:
    Wednesday, July 24, 2019 at 11:55 am

    Barney

    See Turkey. This is how they lost their Democracy. It’s Boiling Frog Syndrome. Increasing secrecy for government is the first sign of the establishment of authoritarian regimes.

    You’ll go anywhere to support your fantasies. 😆

  26. a r @ #1677 Wednesday, July 24th, 2019 – 11:56 am

    The attacks on Bob Brown for opposing a windfarm are exhausting and hypocritical

    As exhausting and hypocritical as…Bob Brown opposing a windfarm (because of aesthetics and birds)?

    Is it too difficult to acknowledge there is a sensible limit to windfarms as there is to anything that is overdone to the point of overkill to coin a phrase …?

  27. ‘Nicholas says:
    Wednesday, July 24, 2019 at 11:51 am

    When the Republic of Ireland’s border is the EU’s border then the EU will have a huge say in what the border will look like. If the UK’s border is the same border as the NI border then the UK will have a huge say in what the border will look like.’

    The Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland could decide pragmatically that it is better to maintain a soft border by their own agreement, and seek the forgiveness of the EU rather than seek permission. If the EU doesn’t like it, what are they going to do? Send troops into Ireland to force them to have a hard border?’

    Ireland is not some MMT fantasy island. Northern Ireland is not a border-setting jurisdiction.

  28. The contest to replace Mitch Fifield as a Victorian senator is shaping up as a two-horse race between Sarah Henderson and Greg Mirabella.

    Hendo or Sophie’s squeeze, take your pick.

  29. The new AFP Commissioner does seem a strange choice.

    I’ll be interested to find out more about him.

    Reece Kershaw has been named the new AFP commissioner.

    He is the current Northern Territory police commissioner. He’ll start in October, when Andrew Colvin officially stands down.

    The Guardian blog

  30. Barney

    Yeah the way dictatorship happens from a previously democratic country is all fantasy.

    Secrecy is the enemy of democracy. So is no secrecy.
    That’s why it’s important to have open process. Make the bastards go to court first to deprive of citizenship.

    That’s normal in a democracy.

  31. Rex Douglas @ #1679 Wednesday, July 24th, 2019 – 12:00 pm

    Is it too difficult to acknowledge there is a sensible limit to windfarms as there is to anything that is overdone to the point of overkill to coin a phrase …?

    Nope. But until the energy mix is 100% renewable we haven’t reached that point and the Greens should be supporting additional renewable generation be it wind, solar, hydro, or anything else that doesn’t produce greenhouse gas emissions.

    Pegasus @ #1682 Wednesday, July 24th, 2019 – 12:03 pm

    and yet BB had other concerns you are conveniently ignoring.

    I read his letter. He spent most of it talking about aesthetics and birds. He did note other concerns, but he didn’t make them his main point of argument. So I won’t either.

  32. a r @ #1685 Wednesday, July 24th, 2019 – 12:05 pm

    Rex Douglas @ #1679 Wednesday, July 24th, 2019 – 12:00 pm

    Is it too difficult to acknowledge there is a sensible limit to windfarms as there is to anything that is overdone to the point of overkill to coin a phrase …?

    Nope. But until the energy mix is 100% renewable we haven’t reached that point and the Greens should be supporting additional renewable generation be it wind, solar, hydro, or anything else that doesn’t produce greenhouse gas emissions.

    Absolutely.

  33. He seems like a ‘good fit’.

    2017: https://alhr.org.au/nt-plan-send-counter-terrorism-taskforce-alice-darwin-police-children/

    Australian Lawyers for Human Rights (ALHR), has expressed dismay at the Northern Territory (NT) Police Commissioner Reece Kershaw’s intention to send the Territory Response Group (TRG), a unit of camouflaged, specialised police with military-grade weapons, to target children in Darwin and Alice Springs at night.
    :::
    ALHR Vice President Kerry Weste said, “We are astonished that a little more than weeks after the NT Government was handed the damning Report of the Royal Commission into the Detention and Protection of Children in the Northern Territory, Chief Minister Gunner would even consider the use of this type of intensive policing to manage vulnerable at-risk children.”

    2019: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/jul/23/we-saw-how-terribly-children-were-treated-in-prisons-and-promised-never-again-now-there-is-just-bitter-disappointment

    Over the past 18 months I, with many others, have watched with bitter disappointment as the Northern Territory government has moved further away from its promises of reform, particularly in recent months as the territory election approaches.
    :::
    The royal commission was clear about what was required to turn the Northern Territory’s trauma-exacerbating youth justice system into something that could offer rehabilitation and hope to young people. The prison blocks had to go, highly specialised staff were essential, culturally and linguistically appropriate programs should be implemented, the age of criminal responsibility had to be raised, and deliberate steps had to be taken to keep children out of the criminal justice system.

    The Northern Territory government is yet to come good on these promises, and overwhelmingly it is children from Alice Springs and its surrounds who are paying the price.
    :::
    At any time, more than three-quarters of the children being held in detention in the Northern Territory are from Alice Springs or the Barkly. Yet, it is Don Dale – above the Berrimah line – which has been allocated $70m to be rebuilt, and it’s Alice Springs which is again being left behind.
    :::
    Over the past 30 years there have been dozens of reports and inquiries into youth detention in Australia. More than 60 reports and inquiries were examined by the royal commission into the detention and protection of children in the Northern Territory. There is no question about what needs to be done, only a question of who is prepared to do it.

    State Labor government ; federal Coalition government

  34. ‘Nicholas says:
    Wednesday, July 24, 2019 at 12:11 pm

    You’re turning into bemused.

    He’s a pompous windbag, like Oakshott Country.’

    The important thing is to remain totally focussed on knocking off Morrison and the Coalition. In order to do this it is wonderful that the Far Left are ignoring personalities, snarks, sneers and the like and maintaining the rage against Morrison.
    Here we have two examples of the Greens doing just that and it is wonderful to see all the energy being targetted at Morrison et al.
    Good on you Nicholas and Rex!

  35. Peg
    Excellent and well-targetted cutnpaste on the sort of person that Dutton is going to appoint as head of the AFP.
    Morrison should hang his head in shame.

  36. NT Police Commissioner to AFP? Bad move, IMO, but no doubt Dutton approves.

    Dutton always takes the opportunity to make snarky comments about his “enemies”.

    find it excruciating to listen to long lectures from Mr Dreyfus because as you know, he is the smartest person in any room, at least by his own account.

    So Anthony Albanese can manage Mark Dreyfus in a different process but we are not going to allow a national security agency to be stifled by Mark Dreyfus and his ability to water down legislation.

  37. It is obvious that Bob Brown has his heart in the right place when it comes to supporting renewable energy. Minor quibbles about eyesores here and there are beside the main point.

    Brown is also right to state that we should focus on reducing energy consumption where we can.

    And Brown is quite right to criticize the Morrison Government for seeking to subsidize coal mining and coal burning.

    At last the Greens are teaming up with Labor to target the evil fossil empire of Morrison and the Coalition.

  38. Australian Senate

    @AuSenate
    The Future Drought Fund Bills have passed the #Senate, with a Centre Alliance amendment to the main bill.

    The House of Representatives will now consider the Senate’s amendment

  39. A reminder Labor. To win an election in a landslide the standard has been set. Tony Abbott. That’s the standard. Govern well just remember the opposition standard set.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *