ANU post-election survey and Essential Research poll

Comprehensive new research suggests a telling shift from the “others” column to the Coalition through the campaign period, while Labor were either consistently overrated by pollsters or fell off a cliff at the end.

Some particularly interesting post-election research has emerged in the shape of a paper from Nicholas Biddle at the Australian National University’s Centre for Social Research and Methods. This draws from the centre’s regular online panel surveys on social attitudes, which encompasses a question on voting intention for reasons unrelated to prediction of election results. The study compares results for 1692 respondents who completed both its pre- and post-election surveys, which were respectively conducted from April 8 to 26 (encompassing the start of the campaign on April 11) and June 3 to 17 (commencing a fortnight after the election). Respondents were excluded altogether if they were either ineligible to vote or failed to answer the voting intention question.

The results are, to a point, consistent with the possibility that pollsters were confounded by a last minute shift to the Coalition, particularly among those who had earlier been in the “others” column. The changes can be summarised as follows, keeping in mind that a “don’t know” response for the April survey was at 2.9%, and 6.5% in the June survey said they did not vote. Since the disparity leaves a net 3.6% of the total vote unaccounted for, the shifts identified below will err on the low side.

The Coalition vote increased an estimated 2.6% from the time of the April survey, suggesting the polls were right to be recording them at around 38% at that time, if not later. However, no movement at all was recorded in the Labor vote, suggesting they were always about four points short of the 37% most polls were crediting them with. The exception here was Ipsos, which had Labor at 33% or 34% in all four of the polls from the start of the year. The Greens fell very slightly, suggesting a poll rounding to whole numbers should have had them at 11% early in the campaign. Newspoll consistently had it at 9%, Ipsos at 13% or 14%, and Essential fluctuated between 9% and 12%.

The biggest move was the 5.9% drop in support for “others”, although a fair bit of this wound up in the “did not vote” column. Even so, it can conservatively be said that pollsters in April should have been rating “others” at around four points higher than their actual election result of 15%, when they were actually coming in only one point higher. This three point gap is reflected in the size of the overestimation of support for Labor.

The results also point to a remarkably high degree of churn — an estimated 28.5% did not stick with the voting intention expressed in April, albeit that a little more than a fifth of this subset did so by not voting at all. The sub-sample of vote changers is small, but it offers little to suggest voters shifted from Labor to the Coalition in particularly large numbers. The Coalition recorded the lowest rate of defection, although the difference with Labor was not statistically significant (I presume it’s normal for major party supporters to be more constant than minor). Conversely, 49.4% of those who left the “others” column went to the Coalition (which comes with a 9% margin of error), and most of the remainder did not vote.

The survey also features statistical analysis to determine the demographic characteristics of vote changers. These find that older voters were generally less likely to be vote changers, and that young vote changers tended not to do so in favour of the Coalition, presumably switching for the most part between Labor and the Greens. Also particularly unlikely to budge were Coalition voters who lived in areas of socio-economic advantage. Those at the other end of this scale, regardless of party support, were most volatile.

Also out this week was the regular fortnightly Essential Research survey, which is still yet to resume its voting intention series but will do so soon. A question on the anticipated impact of government policies over the next three years produces encouraging numbers for the government, with 41% positive and 23% negative. A question on racist sentiments finds 36% agreeing that Australia is a racist country, and 50% saying it is less racist than it was in the past. Breakdowns record no significant differences between those of migrant and non-migrant backgrounds, although the former may include too many of British origin for the results to be particularly revealing.

A question on political interest finds only 15% professing no interest in federal politics, with 53% saying they follow it closely or “enough to know what’s happening”. A big question though is whether polling has gone astray because too many such people are included in their samples. The poll was conducted Thursday to Sunday from a sample of 1075 respondents drawn from an online panel.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,483 comments on “ANU post-election survey and Essential Research poll”

  1. Got me William!

    Good morning Dawn Patrollers. As I type this I am watching the UK House of Commons debate, it is enthralling. The vote for an early election has just failed to achieve the necessary 2/3 majority.

    The government has a plan, and some prayers, for the Australian economy and not even the softest set of numbers in a decade is going to change its mind says an unimpressed Shane Wright.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/sampras-had-a-serve-frydenberg-has-tax-cuts-low-rates-and-trump-20190904-p52nx4.html
    Without some proactive steps from policymakers to boost the productivity of our economy, the 2020s may be a disappointing decade for Australians says the AFP.
    https://outline.com/4uDBJH
    Josh Frydenberg says the national accounts repudiate those trying to talk the Australian economy down, but weakness in the private sector is continuing to play out, writes Jennifer Hewett.
    https://outline.com/CFYpAb
    And Peter Martin explains why we’ve the weakest economy since the global financial crisis with few clear ways out.
    https://theconversation.com/why-weve-the-weakest-economy-since-the-global-financial-crisis-with-few-clear-ways-out-122942
    No surprise, but shocking: there’s no other way to spin Australia’s GDP says Greg Jericho. Some of his exhibits are alarming.
    https://www.theguardian.com/business/grogonomics/2019/sep/04/no-surprise-but-shocking-theres-no-other-way-to-spin-australias-gdp
    Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has been let off lightly by the headlines reporting “only” the weakest economic growth since the GFC, thanks to a little cherry-picking of 12-month periods writes Michael Pascoe.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/money/finance-news/2019/09/04/worst-gdp-growth-since-1990-91-recession/
    Former editor-in-chief of The Sydney Morning Herald Darren Goodsir proclaims that Nine’s Liberal fundraiser is a serious blemish for independent journalism.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/nine-s-liberal-fundraiser-is-a-serious-blemish-for-independent-journalism-20190904-p52nw4.html
    Michelle Grattan writes about the outgoing ASIO head hoping for greater public preparedness to defend Australian sovereignty.
    https://theconversation.com/outgoing-asio-head-hopes-for-greater-public-preparedness-to-defend-australian-sovereignty-122969
    The Hong Kong demonstrators have had their first victory as the extradition bill is withdrawn. But it’s over yet.
    https://www.smh.com.au/world/asia/hong-kong-leader-prepares-for-major-backdown-20190904-p52o02.html
    A key indicator of NSW’s economic performance slumped to zero in the last quarter as Australia recorded its weakest annual growth in a decade report an augmented dynamic duo.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/spending-growth-in-nsw-hits-zero-as-australia-s-economy-slumps-to-gfc-levels-20190904-p52o3e.html
    Home Affairs and the AFP are closing ranks over yesterday’s raid on a former top defence adviser’s home.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/afp-raids-home-of-commonwealth-official-20190904-p52nv8.html
    If Alan Jones is free to speak, in a free market his sponsors are too says Richard Denniss.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/sep/04/if-alan-jones-is-free-to-speak-in-a-free-market-his-sponsors-are-too
    Obstetricians are demanding an urgent review of Medicare rebates after the cost for women who give birth in the private system spiked writes Dana McCauley. It’s now costing some private patients $3200 out of pocket for a baby.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/3200-to-have-a-baby-as-private-obstetricians-out-of-pocket-costs-rise-20190904-p52nxc.html
    Alexandra Smith reports that conservative activists inside the Liberal Party are now considering a motion condemning the state’s abortion bill.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/nsw/berejiklian-faces-rebuke-at-liberal-state-council-over-abortion-bill-20190904-p52nys.html
    Two law lecturers make the case for allowing the Tamil family to stay.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/refugee-rejection-is-more-complex-than-a-soundbite-why-tamil-family-should-stay-20190904-p52nyb.html
    And Anthony Albanese has spoken out against deportation of the struggling Biloela family, writes Dr Jennifer Wilson.
    https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/alp-speaks-out-against-the-plight-of-the-biloela-family,13072
    Michael West writes that control of Australia’s largest aged care and retirement village company (pure-play) is poised to fall to the tax haven of Bermuda – to be owned by the same group of financial engineers who recently took the country’s largest private hospital business to the Cayman Islands.
    https://www.michaelwest.com.au/australian-nursing-homes-off-to-bermuda-as-brookfield-swallows-aveo/
    The big banks are already selling fewer loans through their branches as customers look to mortgage brokers. Now the bar on competition is about to be raised again writes Elizabeth Knight.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/banking-and-finance/the-sleeper-issue-that-could-be-a-nightmare-for-banks-20190904-p52nxm.html
    Reserve Bank governor Philip Lowe may have to explain why the institution has failed to hit its inflation target under a plan being considered by Josh Frydenberg.
    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6367866/treasurer-looks-to-strengthen-rba-agreement-on-inflation/?cs=14350
    The government is close to securing the passage of legislation making it easier to deregister rogue unions and officials although Centre Alliance wants greater clarity to ensure the bill deals with egregious conduct “and does not prevent a responsible union official doing what they normal do”, including protecting workers’ safety and social wellbeing.
    https://outline.com/TatvnU
    Christopher Knaus reports on yesterday’s ICAC proceedings.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/sep/04/former-boss-visited-icac-witnesss-home-on-day-he-was-summonsed-to-deliver-festive-greetings
    Rod Meyer tells us that sixteen frontbench politicians have not declared where their superannuation is invested despite a requirement agreed to by the House of Representatives stating they should do so.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/money/superannuation/2019/09/04/politicians-not-declaring-super/
    According to Jennifer Duke Telstra chief executive Andy Penn has criticised the National Broadband Network for spending on new fibre connections for businesses, claiming the move is out of step with the $51 billion taxpayer-funded company’s purpose of connecting households to the internet.
    https://www.theage.com.au/business/companies/probably-not-necessary-telstra-boss-slams-nbn-over-business-focus-20190904-p52nvf.html
    The sharp wobble in US financial markets on Tuesday was a response to a tangible sign that the escalating trade conflict with China is damaging the US economy. The markets are sending trump a clear message writes Stephen Bartholomeusz.
    https://www.theage.com.au/business/markets/the-markets-are-sending-a-clear-message-to-trump-20190904-p52nu7.html
    Hairbrained Hanson’s plan to combat Medicare fraud by placing photos on cards would cost half a billion dollars and have limited effect, bureaucrats say.
    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6364746/hanson-plan-to-save-millions-in-medicare-fraud-would-actually-cost-a-lot-more-money/?cs=14350
    The accountability provided by the parliamentary committee system is broken and it is “self-evident who broke it”, according to Law Council of Australia president Arthur Moses SC.
    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/6367032/parliamentary-committee-system-broken-law-council-president/?cs=14350
    Police suspected former barrister Nicola Gobbo had been a major drug dealer at Melbourne University and wanted to place her on surveillance over the murders of two underworld figures at an Auskick game in June 2003 reports Tammy Mills.
    https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/police-believed-gobbo-had-been-a-major-drug-dealer-at-melbourne-university-20190904-p52o0s.html
    Paul Karp tells us how the Law Council’s president Arthur Moses says proposed law contains a ‘narrower’ protection for racial discrimination than exists under section 18C.
    https://www.theguardian.com/law/2019/sep/04/religious-discrimination-bill-could-legalise-race-hate-speech-law-council-warns
    Morrison is resisting widespread calls for the government to allow a Tamil family facing deportation to Sri Lanka to remain in Australia, saying he will not chase “Twitter public sentiment”.
    https://www.theage.com.au/politics/federal/pm-won-t-chase-twitter-public-sentiment-on-tamil-family-20190904-p52o21.html
    Ben Schneider reports that John Setka’s rift with much of his own union has deepened with the CFMMEU’s national office moving buildings in a bid to distance themselves from Mr Setka.
    https://www.theage.com.au/politics/federal/cfmmeu-rift-deepens-as-national-office-moves-to-get-away-from-setka-20190904-p52nz7.html
    Retail investors will accept lower dividends if companies are more honest, transparent and socially responsible, with their values evolving beyond short-term returns following the unscrupulous behaviour revealed at the banking royal commission explains Stephen Miles.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/banking-and-finance/companies-on-notice-as-investors-prefer-trust-over-returns-20190904-p52nxv.html
    A collapse in the spot price for electricity in Queensland on Wednesday morning to as low as minus $1000 a megawatt-hour has rattled the industry, and raised questions as to who will bear the losses triggered by a flood of solar generation.
    https://outline.com/HhxEmx
    Peter FitzSimons says reckons that a case decided in the Federal Court on Tuesday has major implications for the Israel Folau case.
    https://www.smh.com.au/sport/the-court-case-that-could-cruel-folau-s-challenge-20190904-p52o0t.html
    Global heating made Hurricane Dorian bigger, wetter – and more deadly.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/sep/04/climate-crisis-hurricane-dorian-floods-bahamas
    A US food-on-demand giant has arrived in Australia just as tensions between local restaurateurs and major food delivery players escalate. DoorDash, the United States’ largest on-demand food platform, launched in Melbourne on Wednesday, with the Victorian culinary capital becoming DoorDash’s first non-US location.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/life/eat-drink/2019/09/04/ubereats-deliveroo-doordash-hungryhungry/
    The New Zealand government has performed a spectacular mea culpa on one of Labour’s signature election policies, walking away from a pledge to build 100,000 affordable new homes within a decade.
    https://www.smh.com.au/world/oceania/we-are-changing-it-new-zealand-backflips-on-100-000-affordable-home-pledge-20190904-p52nw1.html
    Nick Miller writes about the terrible position Boris Johnson has worked himself into.
    https://www.smh.com.au/world/europe/this-was-boris-johnson-s-worst-day-as-pm-and-he-s-not-out-of-the-woods-20190904-p52nrn.html
    Boris Johnson intuitively understands that hard-Brexit chaos will sustain his premiership. He must be stopped says the editorial in the UK Guardian.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/sep/03/the-guardian-view-on-boris-johnson-strategy-split-party-divide-country-win-election
    Kate McClymont examines the less than good behaviour of the deified Charlie Teo.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/brilliant-adored-flawed-dr-charlie-teo-unmasked-20190904-p52nwi.html

    Cartoon Corner

    What a beauty from David Rowe!

    From Matt Golding.



    Another cracker from Mark David.

    Cathy Wilcox and Boris’s Brexit landing.

    Andrew Dyson on Johnson’s treatment by parliament.

    Zanetti with Johnson invoking Churchill.

    From John Shakespeare.

    Nice work from Alan Moir.

    Jon Kudelka cleans up at AFP HQ.
    https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/110ac9ee56b6685fbdb12a7f6eda80a2?width=1024

    From the US








  2. Morning

    BK

    An amazing bumper dawn patrol. Much thanks.

    I too have been following the UK parliament and agree it has been absolutely enthralling!

  3. Thanks BK!

    A collapse in the spot price for electricity in Queensland on Wednesday morning to as low as minus $1000 a megawatt-hour has rattled the industry, and raised questions as to who will bear the losses triggered by a flood of solar generation.

    Funny that the AFR didn’t find a quote indicating that -ve prices are a huge incentive to large-scale storage, although the Kidston PHES project was noted. Put in enough storage and it will soak up the excess supply and drive price back up (maybe even to $0/MWh!) and solar and wind farms would not be curtailed or decide to switch off. Win-win.

  4. Thanks BK

    ‘The New Zealand government has performed a spectacular mea culpa on one of Labour’s signature election policies, walking away from a pledge to build 100,000 affordable new homes within a decade.
    https://www.smh.com.au/world/oceania/we-are-changing-it-new-zealand-backflips-on-100-000-affordable-home-pledge-20190904-p52nw1.html

    I recall doing back-of-the-envelop costings on Bludger which demonstrated that this was never going to happen.

    Land of the Long White Policy Cuckoo Cloud?

  5. ‘Dandy Murray says:
    Thursday, September 5, 2019 at 7:19 am

    Thanks BK!

    A collapse in the spot price for electricity in Queensland on Wednesday morning to as low as minus $1000 a megawatt-hour has rattled the industry, and raised questions as to who will bear the losses triggered by a flood of solar generation.

    Funny that the AFR didn’t find a quote indicating that -ve prices are a huge incentive to large-scale storage, although the Kidston PHES project was noted. Put in enough storage and it will soak up the excess supply and drive price back up (maybe even to $0/MWh!) and solar and wind farms would not be curtailed or decide to switch off. Win-win.’

    Just who is going to put their hard-earned into investments that yield a negative return?

  6. Since 2014, Australia’s refugee status determination system has discriminated between two groups of asylum seekers: people who have arrived by plane and people, like Priya and Nades, who have arrived by boat. Asylum seekers who arrive by boat are only entitled to have their claims assessed through an inferior and “on paper only” review process by a body known as the Immigration Assessment Authority.

    RELATED ARTICLE
    Supporters of the Tamil family gather outside of the Federal Court in Melbourne on Wednesday.
    ASYLUM SEEKERS
    Tamil family granted two more days in last-ditch legal bid to stay in Australia
    Add to shortlist
    The IAA is prohibited from considering any “new evidence” unless restrictive criteria apply. While people who arrive in Australia by plane can apply for a permanent protection visa, people who have arrived by boat can only apply for temporary protection visas of three or five years.

    Priya’s case vividly illustrates the flawed nature of this process. She did not have access to legal advice consistently throughout the process of applying for a Safe Haven Enterprise Visa. Her interview with the department was conducted by phone, rather than in person, when she was eight months’ pregnant and the day after she had been in hospital for a migraine. With Priya in Biloela, her migration agent in Sydney and the department decision-maker and interpreter in Brisbane, the connection to her agent dropped out. The transcript reveals the disjointed effect of this.

    Priya’s lawyers have since said she did not fully understand the interpreter nor was she able to assess if he was correctly interpreting her words. While the Federal Circuit Court judge dismissed this as a reason for ordering a new decision, it should raise concerns about how refugee status determination hearings are conducted.

    While Dutton claims that the courts including the High Court have held that the family are not
    refugees, this misrepresents the legal process. Appeal courts do not assess if a person qualifies for refugee status, or hear new evidence. They only determine if the original decision contained any narrowly defined legal errors. While some IAA decisions have been overturned, these are the exception rather than the rule.

    https://www.smh.com.au/national/refugee-rejection-is-more-complex-than-a-soundbite-why-tamil-family-should-stay-20190904-p52nyb.html

  7. Morning all. Thanks BK. So sad to see Boris denied his no-deal Brexit dream. See what stunts he pulls next to force it anyway.

    Judith Sloan was in full rant about the IA Infrastructure Audit the other day. Her piece had many flaws, among them dismissing population growth at a time when government policy sees record high immigration. She seems to think that more tolled freeway tunnels will allow Generations X and Y to afford their outer suburban dream blocks, even if it is not actually what they want. Meanwhile Vienna has again been voted most desirable address, despite having the higher density Judith fears, and not a freeway tunnel in sight! Excellent public transport though.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/sep/04/worlds-most-liveable-cities-viennas-win-leaves-sydney-and-melbourne-in-a-spin

  8. In the wake of recent mass shootings in America, Congress might be sitting on its hands, but Walmart has decided to act.

    Walmart will stop selling ammunition for military-style weapons and no longer allow customers to openly carry firearms in stores, becoming the latest big-box chain to bow to public pressure that has been building after a recent series of mass shootings around the country.

    The world’s largest retailer had been under mounting calls to respond to two deadly shootings inside its stores this summer in El Paso, and Southaven, Miss. The decision was a blow to gun-rights advocates, some of whom had been showing up at Walmart locations carrying guns on their hips in the hope that the retailer would not shift its policies.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2019/09/03/status-quo-is-unacceptable-walmart-will-stop-selling-some-ammunition-exit-handgun-market/

  9. Just who is going to put their hard-earned into investments that yield a negative return?

    no-one but investments in storage, particularly early investments in storage, will, like the SA tesla battery provide a huge return on investment (mostly to smarter countries, in this case france).

  10. We have recently seen British Labor and Conservative MPs bail from their parties on matters of policy. One such defection has cost the British Government its majority.
    Before the election we had various threats by Nats MPs do the same. Did one end up on the cross benches?
    The Liberals lost Senator Bernardi.
    Rhiannon and Buckingham were briefly persona non grata for the Greens Party.
    We now have two NSW Liberals threaten to bail from the Party on a matter of conscience, again costing a Right Wing government its majority.
    A large number of PHON elected reps have bailed from PHON once elected.

    Never was so much owed by so many to so few? Or what?

    Why is party discipline splintering?

  11. ‘Dandy Murray says:
    Thursday, September 5, 2019 at 7:51 am

    BW,

    Storage buys when price is low, big fella. With negative prices, that mean being paid to be a load.

    Put in enough storage and it will soak up the excess supply and drive price back up (maybe even to $0/MWh!) and solar and wind farms would not be curtailed or decide to switch off. Win-win.’

    No-one is going to invest in something that delivers a price of $0/MWh.

  12. Isn’t this committee chaired by Tim Wilson? What hope of any result…

    Thursday’s hearing in Canberra will see Pyne and the former foreign affairs minister Julie Bishop give evidence to the Senate’s finance and public administration references committee via teleconference. The inquiry has been triggered by controversy about Pyne and Bishop’s private-sector appointments post-politics in fields overlapping directly with their portfolio experience.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/sep/05/christopher-pyne-and-julie-bishop-to-be-grilled-over-private-sector-jobs

  13. “Why is party discipline splintering?”

    Either parties are selecting too many extremist candidates to appeal to particular electorates, who are then not in line with the rest of the party, and/or parties are sticking to policies that are electorally out of date. A bit of both I suspect.

    Or it just reflects that our polity is splintered. Rich vs poor, urban vs rural, inner vs outer urban, miners vs farmers. When politics becomes a winner take all game rather than consensus and compromise, splintering is natural. Scomo is a winner take all kind of guy. If you have a go and win, god lets you keep the lot.

  14. Why is party discipline splintering?

    Because, by and large, they are run by mad people and splitting in the UK is an excellent sign their institutions are not completely dead and corrupt, which cannot be said for the republicans who are betraying their country and their constitution to stay disciplined for an evil criminal party.

  15. Johnson’s contribution to democracy is right out there.

    1. He spent his ministerial life sticking it to Prime Minister May.
    2. He was selected by less than 100,000 Brits to be Prime Minister.
    3. His sole source of legitimacy is a three year old Referendum that was not part of a Constitution, which was bought and paid for, and which did not distinguish between a Deal Brexit and a No Deal Brexit.
    4. He tried to shut down Parliament with the connivance of a hereditary monarch.
    5. He has lost every single vote in the House.
    6. He has lost his majority in the House.
    7. To top it off, the Tory majority in the Peers can filibuster the legislation voted in the House by majorities of up to 56 MPs.

    Naturally the Conservative response to this is to talk about protecting democracy.

  16. Margaret Attwood has written a sequel to The Handmaid’s Tale. Praise be!

    A confluence of political and cultural forces has made “The Testaments” as vital as a baby in Gilead. First, the election of President Trump cattle-prodded “The Handmaid’s Tale” back up the bestseller list. Then Hulu’s adaptation starring Elisabeth Moss inspired millions more to care about the plight of the fertile few. And now that our reproductive freedom hangs on the frail health of a single 86-year-old Supreme Court justice, red-cloaked Handmaids have swarmed capitols across the country. Consequently, the terrain of Gilead is probably more familiar to Americans than the geography of the United States.

    Fans of Atwood’s dystopian classic will remember that Offred, the narrator of “The Handmaid’s Tale,” concluded her secret testimony by acknowledging, “Whether this is my end or a new beginning I have no way of knowing.”

    Now we know.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/books/praise-be-margaret-atwood-has-published-a-sequel-to-the-handmaids-tale/2019/09/03/88f17b7a-ce44-11e9-87fa-8501a456c003_story.html

  17. Lizzie

    My older daughter visited Vienna along with many other places earlier in year. She returned home to state that out of all the places she visited and stayed at, Vienna would be her pick to actually live.

  18. I watched question time etc in the UK parliament and Boris Johnson did not answer one question Jeremy Corbyn put to him.
    It’s bad when Corbyn actually looked more statesmanlike than the PM.
    Doesn’t stop me believing that should Corbyn be replaced as leader, Labour would have a very good show in any future election.

  19. Exactly my thoughts yesterday

    BBC Newsnight

    @BBCNewsnight
    Labour MP Lisa Nandy says that she believes it is important that the Brexit delay bill “is implemented, not just passed… before we vote for a General Election” because “you just can’t trust a word” Boris Johnson says.#Newsnight | @lisanandy

  20. BUT this was said in 2016! Since then, we have reaped more ‘benefits’.

    Selling public assets has created unregulated monopolies that hurt productivity and damage the economy, according to Australia’s consumer and competition tsar, who says he is on the verge of becoming a privatisation opponent.

    In a blistering attack on decades of common government practice, Australian Competition and Consumer Commission chairman Rod Sims said the sale of ports and electricity infrastructure and the opening of vocational education to private companies had caused him and the public to lose faith in privatisation and deregulation.

    “I’ve been a very strong advocate of privatisation for probably 30 years; I believe it enhances economic efficiency,” Mr Sims told the Melbourne Economic Forum on Tuesday.

    “I’m now almost at the point of opposing privatisation because it’s been done to boost proceeds, it’s been done to boost asset sales and I think it’s severely damaging our economy.”

    https://www.smh.com.au/business/privatisation-has-damaged-the-economy-says-accc-chief-20160726-gqe2c2.html?fbclid=IwAR1w2Tyjhp-PXT7hB8nreqBkfiSf9ZakWTsfWgK1DDZ7rWyKQDo4CheqDy4

  21. Adam Liaw @adamliaw
    ·
    2m
    I am going to open a cafe chain where you order coffee by just stating the number of shots and volume of milk you want.

    “I’ll have a 2/150.”

    “I’ll have a 1/100. Skim.”

    My digital coffee ordering system will disrupt the entire global coffee system.

  22. Thanks BK for this morning’s Dawn Patrol.

    The article about Dr Charlie Teo makes for both fascinating and disturbing reading.

    Clearly the gentleman has talent but also an ego to match and probably a bullying and narcissistic streak as well. Feathers amongst the medical fraternity have been ruffled as well.

    It will be interesting to see how this plays following Kate’s article.

    By the by… my ex-partner was good friends with husband and wife plastic surgeons. It was interesting to hear their summation of their plastic surgeon colleagues… not at all complementary.

  23. lizzie says:

    Thursday, September 5, 2019 at 8:50 am
    Adam Liaw @adamliaw
    ·
    2m
    I am going to open a cafe chain where you order coffee by just stating the number of shots and volume of milk you want.

    “I’ll have a 2/150.”

    “I’ll have a 1/100. Skim.”

    My digital coffee ordering system will disrupt the entire global coffee system.

    I’ll have a 4/0 thanks! 🙂

  24. That chart shows how dumb Trump is.

    All he needed to do was ask for one that projected out another 6-12 hours and it would’ve included his etchings and more.

  25. This seems a bit over the top, especially considering it was just distributed to a closed group of fellow workers.

    Oil refinery worker fired over Downfall parody video loses unfair dismissal claim

    Scott Tracey was sacked after using scene from film about Hitler’s final days to depict his bosses during wage negotiation

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/sep/05/oil-refinery-worker-fired-over-downfall-parody-video-loses-unfair-dismissal-claim

  26. Scott Tracey was sacked after using scene from film about Hitler’s final days to depict his bosses during wage negotiation

    Guess he failed to include a generous severance package as part of his negotiations? Short-sighted.

  27. William,

    Can you give some context to your comment:

    “although the former may include too many of British origin for the results to be particularly revealing.”

    Regards

    B

  28. Sorry, but it’s a slow news day.
    Your tattoos may live on after you. Reading this, I realise that I am a “super conservative”. 🙂

    “It’s the family we care about – who am I to say how they should remember their loved one?” Kyle said.
    “Most super conservative people disagree with tattoos in general and have no Idea what they mean to people.”

    The Sherwoods do have limits on what they will and won’t do, drawing a line at preserving face and genital tattoos.

    They have also knocked back requests for lampshades and book covers to be made, opting to stick to wall mounted pieces instead.

    “We are helping families and fulfilling their last wishes,” Kyle said.
    “We are not trying to create a freakshow.”

    https://www.9news.com.au/world/tattoo-preservation-mortician-service-memorial-artwork-kyle-michael-sherwood/a82ea4d9-75ef-419a-92ac-de27495fdf7d

  29. I find the Charlie Teo thing a bit interesting.
    It parallels the Tony Aboott posture on the Republic, in that he profitted from successfully tarnishing all politicians with his “You can’t trust a politician” schtick. Somehow being the liar in chief did not stop people from trusting him when he made his populist staement.
    Charlie is trying to tap into the general willingness to tar the medical profession as somehow being a closed shop with vested interests lorded over by ignorant egotistical bullies, while he denies the scientific consensus and uses his wealth profile and media power to trample dissenters and enrich himself while exhibiting gross arrogance, bullying and mysogyny.
    Kate McC is being very brave in that the surge of hatred she will get from his fan club is a whole different type of reaction from what she is used to from corrupt politicians.

  30. B,

    I would have thought he was saying, with changing immigration patterns, lumping them all together can hide how some newer groups, with a different cultural background, are reacting.

  31. Boerwar says:
    Thursday, September 5, 2019 at 10:05 am

    The Johnson Government has been expeditious.

    It skipped the honeymoon and went straight from the wedding to an acrimonious divorce.

    Has it even been consummated?

    Maybe than can get an annulment! 🙂

  32. Just who is going to put their hard-earned into investments that yield a negative return?

    Anyone who’s buying German, Swiss, Dutch, French, Japanese… government bonds?

    That said, the overall point is that when wholesale electricity prices are negative that means a storage facility gets paid to store the energy – and then they can get also paid to supply it later when the price is positive. Getting paid coming and going – nice work if you can get it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *