Essential Research: cost of living (open thread)

The latest fortnightly Essential poll suggests voters won’t be giving the new government much breathing space before holding it responsible for rising inflation.

Still no sign of Newspoll, despite today’s resumption of parliament, nor of voting intention from the latest fortnightly Essential Research poll. As reported by The Guardian, the latter turns out to be the most discouraging set of numbers for the Albanese government so far, in that 40% were already prepared to rate the government as doing a poor job on relieving cost of living pressures, compared with 23% for good and 37% for neither. Apart from that, all the unusually spare report from The Guardian has to tell us is that “a majority of respondents believe the Albanese government can influence the direction of inflation and interest rates”, which seems unlikely to bode well. The poll was conducted from a sample of 1082, presumably from Thursday to Monday – the full report should be on the pollster’s website later today.

UPDATE: While “neither good nor poor” responses are high in each case, the poll also finds the government rated good on the pandemic by 36% and poor by 25%; good on education by 35% and poor by 18%; and good on climate change by 33% and poor by 21%. Forty-four per cent supported the government’s carbon emissions target while 40% said it did not go far enough, but no option was provided for those who felt it went too far. Fifty per cent said the Greens should support the government, with a question that emphasised Labor had been elected on that basis, while 25% said they should only do so if Labor agreed to changes consistent with its own policies.

Also of note:

Latika Bourke of the Age/Herald reports that Liberals Andrew Hastie and Simon Birmingham are looking at the example followed by David Cameron after the Conservatives’ 2005 election defeat to improve diversity in the party’s parliamentary ranks, which involved producing a leadership-backed “A-list” of diverse candidates and encouraging local party associations (which lack a clear equivalent in Australian party structures) to choose candidates through primaries open to non-members.

• The Australian Electoral Commission has deregistered the Liberal Democrats, belatedly giving effect to legislation passed last year that effectively prohibited minor parties from having the words Liberal or Labor in their names. The party was cleverly able to keep the existing name at the May election after withdrawing its application to change its name to the Liberty Democrats (officially the Liberty and Democracy Party) in late March, which compelled the AEC to initiate a lengthy deregistration process that has only now come to fruition.

• Two days after a Daily Telegraph report suggesting he has designs on Marise Payne’s Senate seat should she soon vacate it, the Milton Ulladulla Times reports Andrew Constance plans to run again in Gilmore at the next federal election, after falling 373 votes short of taking the seat from Labor’s Fiona Phillips in May.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,429 comments on “Essential Research: cost of living (open thread)”

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  1. and encouraging local party associations (which lack a clear equivalent in Australian party structures) to choose candidates through primaries open to non-members.

    Isn’t that what the IPA does for the Liberal party? Just without the primaries!

  2. Dai Le looks to be the darling of the Today Show on Channel 9. She’s the first person they interviewed this morning. There are Teals from Sydney they could have chosen but Today chose her.

    And if you want any proof that she’s a Liberal in Independent’s clothing then you just had to listen to her. She said she’s had meetings with the government, and “Opposition Ministers”. 🙄

    And apropos of the prelude to the blog up top, the morning shows on commercial TV aren’t cutting the government any slack over inflation and rising prices. And they heartily agree with Dai Le that the petrol excise cut should be kept beyond its September cut-off date. So I can see a continuing campaign over that, even though it’s economically reckless to do so. But no one with a megaphone is saying that.

  3. This is Axios’ analysis of the American economy, but the exact same applies here I think:

    Consumer spending and job creation remain robust, contributing to what Axios’ Neil Irwin recently called the “great weirdness” of our current economy.

    Why it matters: That same weirdness has opened a gulf between what official data reflects and the perceptions of consumers — who are relatively flush with cash, but ravaged by white-hot prices.

    What’s happening: The irony is that consumers, though in a glum mood, are keeping growth and inflation afloat by continuing to spend. That, in turn, has emboldened companies to pass that along in higher prices.

    The labor market is as tight as it’s ever been, awash in unfilled positions. The economy is generating above-average jobs growth despite spiking prices.
    “Net, net, consumers are still spending their hearts out, which keeps the recession from becoming a reality,” FWDBonds chief economist Chris Rupkey said.

  4. Soc,
    I posted a press conference between General Mark Milley and Sec Def Austin last night where they gave granular detail of the effect the HIMARS are having. They also addressed whether ATACMS should be used in Ukraine. Cud churlishly dismissed their rationale for not using them, even though they have a greater range than the HIMARS. They stated that supplying the ammunition for them is the drawback because they can only be fired once before needing to be re-loaded, as opposed to the HIMARS being able to be fired multiple times. So supplying ammunition for the ATACMS is a greater logistical problem. I can see their point.

  5. Government to rewrite climate bill to win over Greens
    By Mike Foley
    The Albanese government is promising to rewrite its signature climate reforms to secure support from the Greens by including a change to make clear its target of 43 per cent emissions reduction by 2030 is a minimum that could be upgraded over time.

    Labor’s concession on the eve of the first parliamentary session is a crucial bargaining play as the new government seeks support for its first major bill.
    ——————-
    Sensible politics and policy. Starting the first Parliamentary term with a compromise that has limited practical significance, but supports the messaging of cooperation and consultation between progressive parties and the crossbench is a good move.

  6. Ah, I just figured out why Dutton went to America before parliament sat for the year. To marinate in American Right Wing political tactics. And to get his riding orders from the Trumpists more than likely.

  7. but inflation was bad under liberals but media did not care di le was a former liberal party member who will most likely rejoin during the term he said when elected that she was not a fake independent like the teels s but a real one

  8. #weatheronPB
    The damp curtain lifts, slowly.
    Before shadows form, one bird questions, calling.
    Another arrives, expecting, staring, probing.

  9. Good to see Labor modifying it’s climate legislation to reach aAgreement with the Greens. Keeping the 43% but making it a minimum is pragmatic.

    Dealing with the cost of living is a lot tougher. The Liberals thoughtfully booby-trapped the economy on the way out the door. Voting to elect Morrison did ruin a lot of people’s weekend. Many of the issues Morrison and Frydenberg entrenched, like dependence on one of the world’s least efficient fleets of gas guzzling utes, will take years to fix.

    Economically raising wages is a better solution than band aid measures on prices beyond government control. Labor can influence power prices but fuel not so much and only at huge cost.

    If Labor does tamper with the fuel levy they should wind back mining and agriculture diesel tax rebates at the same time. At least eliminate some rorts and put everyone on the same footing.

  10. Good morning Dawn Patrollers

    Katherine Murphy takes a look at what’s in the latest Essential poll.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2022/jul/26/guardian-essential-poll-40-of-voters-say-labor-doing-poor-job-tackling-surging-cost-of-living
    The Albanese government is promising to rewrite its signature climate reforms to secure support from the Greens including a change to make clear its target of 43 per cent emissions reduction by 2030 is a minimum that could be upgraded over time, explains Mike Foley.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/government-to-rewrite-climate-bill-to-win-over-greens-20220725-p5b4fn.html
    Trump 2.0 poses a grave risk to the US, and Australia, argues Peter Hartcher. Frightening, really.
    https://www.smh.com.au/world/north-america/trump-2-0-poses-a-grave-risk-to-the-us-and-australia-20220725-p5b485.html
    The SMH editorial says that the parliamentary agenda must be balanced by budget restraint.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/parliamentary-agenda-must-be-balanced-by-budget-restraint-20220725-p5b4ev.html
    And The Canberra Times’ editorial says that by the time Parliament breaks on Thursday, Australians will have an idea of how their new government will work and whether or not Anthony Albanese’s bid to rein in some of the acrimonious excesses of the past three years has a chance of succeeding.
    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/7833474/albaneses-team-faces-baptism-of-fire/?cs=27763
    As parliament returns, Albanese must not lose sight of his promise to leave no one behind, implores Edwina MacDonald.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/jul/25/as-parliament-returns-albanese-must-not-lose-sight-of-his-promise-to-leave-no-one-behind
    Paul Bongiorno says that Anthony Albanese faces daunting challenges and can take nothing for granted.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/politics/australian-politics/2022/07/26/anthony-albanese-challenges-paul-bongiorno/
    A grim double dilemma haunts Labor ahead of a looming confrontation of politics with economics, says Simon Benson.
    https://amp.theaustralian.com.au/nation/politics/grim-double-dilemma-haunts-labor-ahead-of-a-looming-confrontation-of-politics-with-economics/news-story/01f112bb3cc7b73b02a51ded054a3d34
    On the subject of small government and free markets, Alan Kohler ponders whether it is driven by either of ideology or greed. Quite an interesting read, this one.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/finance/2022/07/25/small-government-free-market-kohler/
    Stuart Ayres has been interviewed as part of the independent inquiry into the controversial appointment of John Barilaro to a plum New York role, while maintaining the former deputy premier would have made a fine trade commissioner to the United States.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/nsw/ayres-interviewed-as-part-of-independent-inquiry-into-barilaro-trade-appointment-20220725-p5b4gn.html
    Defence Minister Richard Marles wants to substantially increase the lethality and strategic strike power of the Australian Defence Force within the next five to seven years. This is an extremely ambitious time frame which would ­almost certainly make the Albanese government accountable for real-time defence delivery, a nearly unique circumstance in recent Australian history, writes Greg Sheridan.
    https://amp.theaustralian.com.au/nation/defence/richard-marles-on-the-attack-in-revival-of-australian-defence-force/news-story/00df11f9555bc9748f23e94fef86fda7
    Labor will struggle in the Senate to abolish the Australian Building and Construction Commission, but is ready to defund the watchdog if needed, say Phil Coorey and David Marin-Guzman.
    https://www.afr.com/politics/federal/government-could-deny-abcc-budget-if-moves-to-abolish-it-fail-20220725-p5b48a
    James Robertson thinks Anthony Albanese may have finally snookered the Greens on climate.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/politics/2022/07/25/greens-climate-snookered-by-albanese/
    Scott Morrison’s decision to skip the opening of parliament to attend a conference in Tokyo with other former conservative world leaders has fuelled speculation among Liberals about his political future, writes Lisa Visentin. (The sooner Morrison is out of our lives, the better!)
    https://www.theage.com.au/politics/federal/morrison-to-miss-first-week-of-new-parliament-20220725-p5b4dc.html
    Although the activities of politicians from minor parties and independents should fall under integrity legislation, we should mostly be grateful that they contain more enthusiasts for a tough and expansive system than within the government, writes Jack Waterford.
    https://johnmenadue.com/its-the-teals-who-are-the-most-representative-on-integrity-issues/
    Katina Curtis reports that casual and part-time employees will be able to access the full 10 days of domestic violence leave under a new entitlement the government is putting to parliament.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/casuals-part-timers-will-get-full-paid-domestic-violence-leave-in-new-scheme-20220725-p5b4bf.html
    High prices and a big push by the ATO mean Labor’s budget will get billions of extra dollars in revenue from Australia’s offshore LNG projects, explains Jennifer Hewett.
    https://www.afr.com/policy/tax-and-super/the-tax-man-cometh-for-the-gas-industry-20220725-p5b4fq
    Extraordinary profits generated by rapacious exporters have gone largely untaxed by Coalition governments, says Alan Austin.
    https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/coalitions-failure-to-tax-gas-windfall-profits-cost-the-nation-billions,16592
    The AIMN wants us to avoid the lunatic fringe and holds up Hollie Hughes as a prime example.
    https://theaimn.com/avoiding-the-lunatic-fringe/
    Poor-quality construction was the most common complaint for new home buyers in NSW over the past three years, with plumbing and solar issues also high on the list of concerns for residents. NSW Fair Trading received about 11,000 complaints each year between 2019 and 2021. The main issue raised was the quality of construction, which included defective work, incomplete work and unsatisfactory performance.
    https://www.smh.com.au/property/news/almost-financially-ruined-us-the-number-one-complaint-of-new-home-buyers-in-nsw-20220721-p5b3j0.html
    Nick Toscano reports that Victorian apartment developers will be banned from striking private deals with electricity retailers that lock residents into contracts covering entire buildings, under changes the Andrews government says will empower consumers to seek better offers as energy prices rise.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/developers-banned-from-locking-apartment-residents-into-energy-deals-20220725-p5b4av.html
    It’s often said that sky-high property prices could be fixed by the release of more land but a new report suggests this is not the case – and that developers are gaming the system, explains Cara Waters.
    https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/land-banking-by-big-developers-driving-up-property-prices-report-20220725-p5b486.html
    Quality journalism is crucial to a healthy democracy because it holds power to account and informs the public when politicians are misbehaving, are corrupt, or incompetent, writes Victoria Fielding who says biased reporters should lose their status as ‘journalists’.
    https://independentaustralia.net/business/business-display/biased-reporters-should-lose-status-as-journalists,16594
    The Teal independents are still riding a wave of media adulation. The coverage suggests a new, more idealistic way of practising politics. But when MPs emphasise the primacy of their own electorates, the unity of the nation is overlooked, writes Mark Sawyer.
    https://michaelwest.com.au/triumph-of-the-teals-a-media-love-in-rolls-on/
    Even if they don’t lose their homes, a significant cohort of stressed borrowers is about to emerge with very little fat to cut in their budgets as mortgage rates rise. It’s beef mince and tap water from now on, writes Jess Irvine.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/a-farewell-to-shiraz-and-wagyu-155-000-borrowers-to-feel-intense-pain-20220725-p5b48g.html
    International airfares have doubled as blistering demand and shrunken capacity has enabled airlines to raise prices to combat higher fuel costs, explains Elizabeth Knight. I must admit, I have no desire to fly anywhere anymore.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/companies/airfares-hit-maximum-altitude-as-capacity-constraints-hit-the-market-20220725-p5b4dn.html
    Sydney airport has been named among the world’s worst airports for flight cancellations and delays in the past two months. Data compiled by the flight tracking and data platform FlightAware ranked Sydney sixth-worst for flight cancellations, with 5.9% of flights cancelled, and ninth-worst for delays, with 34.2% of flights affected.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2022/jul/25/sydney-airport-ranked-among-worlds-worst-as-delays-persist-chaos-doesnt-come-close
    Michaela Whitbourn takes us through yesterday’s closing statement from Ben Roberts-Smith’s lawyer.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/bigger-knolls-at-bondi-ben-roberts-smith-barrister-rejects-cliff-kick-claim-20220725-p5b4ao.html
    More than 200 NDIS participants were having their funding slashed by 20 per cent or more every day in the final months of the Morrison government, internal documents have revealed. But almost double the number of plans increased substantially in the same period, according to the agency in charge of the scheme, reports Dan Jervis-Bardy.
    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/7832369/unimaginable-ndis-funding-slashed-every-day-under-former-government/?cs=14329
    Waiting lists for SA’s public health specialists are so long people are dying before getting to see a doctor – but incredibly, the maximum seven-year wait is an improvement, writes Brad Crouch for The Advertiser.
    https://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/sevenyear-wait-to-see-specialist-in-sa-public-health-system-is-an-improvement-on-the-previous-16year-maximum/news-story/4bf40800f229e2dde60f2e21eef4edd9?amp
    Humans excrete about 10 grams of urea, and about 1 gram of phosphorous, through their urine daily, writes Angus Dalton who tells us about Freguia, a part of a $3.8 million new Hub for Nutrients in a Circular Economy, funded by the Australian Research Council, to find a commercially viable method of recouping urea flushed down toilets (100 tonnes of the stuff is produced in Melbourne and Sydney alone per day).
    https://www.theage.com.au/business/entrepreneurship/you-re-a-walking-urea-factory-could-your-pee-help-avert-the-fertiliser-crisis-20220725-p5b4ec.html
    Conservationists have declared a win in a fight over Tasmania’s takyana/Tarkine rainforest after a judge found the Morrison government had erred in approving preliminary work on a mining waste dam. Adam Morton tells us that federal court justice Mark Moshinsky found the then environment minister, Sussan Ley, had failed to apply the precautionary principle before allowing drilling and surveying works for a new tailings dam near the town of Rosebery, on the state’s west coast.
    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2022/jul/26/judge-finds-morrison-government-erred-in-approving-preliminary-work-on-tailings-dam-in-the-tarkine
    The CPA is saying the construction industry is facing a ‘raft of insolvencies’ without assistance.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/construction-industry-faces-raft-of-insolvencies-without-assistance-20220725-p5b47z.html
    Josh Butler tells us that a bill to overturn a federal ban on the Northern Territory and Australian Capital Territory passing voluntary assisted dying laws will be introduced to parliament next week, setting up the first conscience vote of the new government.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2022/jul/25/federal-labor-allows-conscience-vote-on-push-to-overturn-ban-on-act-and-nt-assisted-dying-laws
    The US Fed is set to announce another big rate rise this week and will continue to do so for the rest of the year, adding to the existing pressures already on Australia’s Reserve Bank, writes Stephen Bartholomeusz.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/markets/the-us-is-setting-up-the-rba-for-some-painful-decisions-20220725-p5b481.html
    There is one man to blame for the lorries backed up in Dover. That’s Boris Johnson, says Simon Benson.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/jul/25/lorries-dover-boris-johnson-tory-leadership-brexit
    If you have a miscarriage in Republican America, your health is now at risk declares Moira Donegan.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/jul/25/abortion-republicans-anti-choice-women-health-risk
    Pope Francis has apologised to Canada’s indigenous people on their land for the church’s role in schools where indigenous children were abused. And ha had the hide to ask for forgiveness!
    https://www.smh.com.au/world/north-america/i-ask-forgiveness-pope-apologises-for-deplorable-evil-of-canadian-indigenous-schools-20220726-p5b4hr.html

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  11. Weather in Canberra

    Little damp which means just cold not freezing.

    Scratching at door to be let in a cafe at 7.20am. Play too much Belinda Carlisle.

  12. Blog intro:
    The latest fortnightly Essential poll suggests voters won’t be giving the new government much breathing space before holding it responsible for rising inflation.
    _____________________
    Bloody oath. They talked a big game before the election. They now need to back it up.

  13. do not know where phillop corie is getting his imfo from but i understand labor and the greens both support abolishing abcc so dont know whiy he thinks it will be tough foor klabor to abolish

  14. Taylormade says:
    Tuesday, July 26, 2022 at 7:55 am
    The latest fortnightly Essential poll suggests voters won’t be giving the new government much breathing space before holding it responsible for rising inflation.
    _____________________
    Bloody oath. They talked a big game before the election. They now need to back it up.

    ———————————————————-

    Lol Taylormade , so far Labor has backed up their election promises (5.3% increase to minimal wage and already have done more in 2 months than the lib/nats did when they were in government for 9 years

  15. I guess this is why Murdoch is writing off Trump.

    —‘
    BREAKING: Pence aides Short and Jacob answered questions about the 1/4 meeting with TRUMP, PENCE, SHORT, JACOB and EASTMAN, along with questions about Rudy in front of a federal grand jury after receiving DoJ subpoenas. https://t.co/z4Ugx2Wdns

  16. Thank you, BK. And William.

    Same old, same old? The Establishment? Labor has killed this Goebbelsian Lie stone dead.

    Labor is being polite and respectful in its negotiations – even with the Teals who can’t make a difference.

    Labor has killed the climate wedge. (Dutton and Bandt will keep flogging the dead horse, of course!)

    Labor has done more for women in eight weeks than the Coalition did in nine years.

    Labor is working on a FICAC with teeth and will have it in place and functional by this time next year.
    This cuts the legs out from under the Teals and the Greens.

    Climate, respect (especially for women) and integrity: the three legs of the Teal campaign owned by Labor.

    This leaves Labor having to fight the next election on the hip pocket nerve: an uphill battle from day one, IMO.

    What HAS Labor done for women in eight short weeks? If you have previously read the first eleven, I suggest you skip straight to 12 – the latest Labor initiative.

    1. Labor has more female MPs than male MPs. (The Abbott, Turnbull and Morrison governments were not within a bull’s roar of this achievement.)
    2. Labor is fully committed to implementing all the Jenkins Report recommendations. (The Morrison Government implemented a view recommendations but basically sat on the vast majority of the Report’s recommendations.)
    3. High levels of women in the ministry. (Abbott, Turnbull and Morrison governments had far, far fewer women in the ministry).
    4. Labor gave a direction to the Fair Work Commission to specifically take into account the gender pay gap along with power to make gender specific determinations to close the gap. (The Abbott, Turnbull and Morrison governments had one universal ambitions: to damp down any real wage growth and showed zero interest in closing the gender pay gap.)
    5. Labor intervened directly in the minimum wage decision which disproportionately benefits the lowest paid workers: women. (Abbott, Turnbull and Morrison did not do this.)
    6. In recent departmental secretary appointments: Labor appointed three out of the four women. (Morrison’s last five secretarial appointments in 2019 involved a net loss of three women.)
    7. Labor is setting the tone by promising to make boards, such as the Reserve Bank Board more representative.
    8. Three Labor women ministers to lead aspects of the skills and jobs summit that relate to women’s participation, women upskilling and closing the wages gap.
    9. Labor has avoided school holidays for sitting days.
    10. Morrison Government sat on the Report on the National Stakeholder Consultation for a Ten Year Domestic Violence Plan. Labor has released the Report with expedition.
    11. Labor introduces paid domestic violence leave legislation
    12. Ten days domestic violence leave for casual workers.

  17. ‘Victoria says:
    Tuesday, July 26, 2022 at 8:13 am

    I guess this is why Murdoch is writing off Trump.
    …’
    ——————————
    I thought it was the other way around and the Murdoch is merely acknowledging the inevitable?

  18. Thanks for the roundup BK. These two stories were music to my ears. For those who say voting Labor doesn’t make a difference, there is no way this would have happened without a Labor government.

    “ High prices and a big push by the ATO mean Labor’s budget will get billions of extra dollars in revenue from Australia’s offshore LNG projects, explains Jennifer Hewett.”
    https://www.afr.com/policy/tax-and-super/the-tax-man-cometh-for-the-gas-industry-20220725-p5b4fq
    “Extraordinary profits generated by rapacious exporters have gone largely untaxed by Coalition governments, says Alan Austin.”
    https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/coalitions-failure-to-tax-gas-windfall-profits-cost-the-nation-billions,16592

  19. ‘Aaron newton says:
    Tuesday, July 26, 2022 at 8:01 am

    do not know where phillop corie is getting his imfo from but i understand labor and the greens both support abolishing abcc so dont know whiy he thinks it will be tough foor klabor to abolish’
    ———————————
    It is an illusion that the Greens control the Senate.

  20. Thanks BK

    On the Essential findings, I’d be cautious in interpreting them.

    Clearly the cost of living is rising fast at the moment. In a way it’s self evident that the government hasn’t been “successful” in relieving cost of living pressures, if you’re going to frame the question that way, as costs are still rising fast. It doesn’t follow that voters see that as a failure to meet their expectations.

    The counterpoint to that is that “a majority of respondents believe the Albanese government can influence the direction of inflation and interest rates”. That might imply voters do think the government should be able to do something about it (and is failing to). Well maybe. It’s also self evident that a government can “influence” the direction of inflation and interest rates. If anybody thinks it through, the literal answer to that question has to be yes.

    Making reliable inferences from these one off issue polling questions is difficult. Voting intention is and always will be the main game.

  21. The last election may be interpreted as somewhat of an aberration.

    Climate change, womens issues, and corruption were important drivers of voter behaviour. As was the hip pocket nerve, let us not forget. Albanese’s approach to no new taxes and to allowing the stage 3 tax cuts through to the keeper as well as dropping various housing policies ensured that the hip pocket nerve was deadened. On the positive side, Albanese was able to promise to put upwards pressure on wages. He has already done this with initiatives for the minimum wage. But Albanese will find that the electorate swallows success readily but will always be looking around for what is next.

    Many people are hurting badly with rising interest rates and with inflation and with real wages falling.

    The next election will, presumably, revert to the norm namely that the hip pocket nerve will dominate the outcome.

  22. Lots of commentary over the past year in the US that AG Merrick Garland has been dragging his feet regarding holding Trump and his cronies accountable.

    Maybe today the narrative has changed in light of latest developments

  23. ‘Met Police admits not sending Boris Johnson questionnaires over Partygate gatherings .. Force accused of ‘deferential policing’ after it confirms not seeking details from PM over two events before deciding not to fine him’

    https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2022/jul/25/met-finally-admits-not-sending-boris-johnson-questionnaires-over-partygate-gatherings
    __________________________________________________________

    Re William’s mention of Call-me-Dave Cameron’s idea of ‘open primary’ selections of A-list candidates I don’t think they ever actually did that

  24. Thanks BK

    Max

    “ Sensible politics and policy. Starting the first Parliamentary term with a compromise that has limited practical significance, but supports the messaging of cooperation and consultation between progressive parties and the crossbench is a good move.”

    +1, there’s a lot to be said for commonsense and I’m hopeful we’ll see more of this from Albo throughput the term.

  25. Regarding the “sleeping US DOJ”, and I’ve posted this link before, Marcy Wheeler gives a run down of what the DOJ have been doing to “Trumpworld” since Garland took the reins.

    https://www.emptywheel.net/2022/07/16/what-doj-was-doing-while-everyone-was-whinging-doj-wasnt-doing-anything/
    https://www.emptywheel.net/about/

    I’m inclined to believe that the “do nothing DOJ” is a fabrication, designed (or evolved) to garner outrage or at the very least to generate daily interest among people who are one or more steps removed from the legal process. What Garland has been doing is the classic mobster takedown, aided by the more public J6C theatre. (Murdoch may be throwing in the towel. We’ll see.)

  26. “ Absorbing as they may be, the US Congressional hearings into the January 6 insurrection have told us a great deal more about something that we already knew: that Donald Trump tried to overthrow democracy in the US by fomenting a violent attack on the Congress.”

    That so many Americans can’t or won’t see this is almost beyond belief and hints at national level cognitive dissonance. It is critical imo that Trump never return to the Presidency. What we saw between 2016-2020 would seem like a sideshow in comparison and could inflict fatal wounds on American democracy. The mid-terms will tell us whether Americans realise this or are continuing to sleepwalk to their doom.

    https://www.smh.com.au/world/north-america/trump-2-0-poses-a-grave-risk-to-the-us-and-australia-20220725-p5b485.html


  27. shellbellsays:
    Tuesday, July 26, 2022 at 7:42 am
    Weather in Canberra

    Little damp which means just cold not freezing.

    Scratching at door to be let in a cafe at 7.20am. Play too much Belinda Carlisle.

    Shellbell
    This post may real interest you.

    Will Pucovski remains part of Australia’s long-term plans, and has been named in an eight-man group of emerging batters and spin bowlers to head to the MRF Pace Foundation in Chennai for a ten-day training camp in August.

    https://www.espncricinfo.com/story/australia-news-pucovski-to-head-to-india-for-10-day-training-camp-1326104

  28. Late Riser

    Agreed.

    Trump and his cronies, including those still in congress are done for.

    You only have to see what the jan6 committee did by showing Josh Hawley running during the insurrection.
    In the context of the hearing, it was just an indulgence by the committee.

    I interpreted as, we know what you did. Lol

  29. ‘Socrates says:
    Tuesday, July 26, 2022 at 6:40 am

    Former minister Sussan Ley failed to consider environmental risks in a mine approval under the EPBC Act. Shocked, I am.
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-07-25/bob-brown-foundation-court-win-mmg-mine-tailings-dam-approval/101265998
    —————————-
    A true sign of thorough incompetence. The intent all along was to ignore environmental risks. ‘Considering’ means just that. It does not mean actually taking any notice of the risks. Ley was apparently so arrogant that she could not be bothered ticking the relevant box and making sure that that process was recorded.

  30. For anybody cheering the defunding of the ABCC before it has been legislatively abolished, I encourage you to read this article which I think sums up nicely how problematic a position that is.

    https://amp.smh.com.au/public-service/the-slow-death-of-the-office-of-the-australian-information-commissioner-20150826-gj81dl.html

    To give a preview:

    When executive action has “the effective result of emasculating a statutory body”, it is clear that “the wall of protection separating the executive from the legislature has been breached”.

  31. Cronus
    The Right has been systematic on its assaults, large and small, on democracy. They know what they are about.

  32. How long before we know what Trumps secret service detail, were doing on behalf of Trump.
    Could be sooner than later.
    We live in interesting times.

    —-

    NEW: Marc Short was not the only Pence advisor who testified before a grand jury in connection w/ the Justice Department’s expanding Jan. 6 probe — so did Pence’s legal counsel, Greg Jacob.

    Prosecutors asked about Eastman, Giuliani & more. w/@aviswanatha https://t.co/sodfRijnY1

  33. Everyone’s a winner …

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/government-to-rewrite-climate-bill-to-win-over-greens-20220725-p5b4fn.html

    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/politics/2022/07/25/greens-climate-snookered-by-albanese/

    The Greens get a gold, the Independents get a silver and have also lodged an appeal, Labor gets a bronze but also win the consolation prize of still being able to bash the Greens for asking for too much … and as usual the fossil fuel cartel walks off with the prize money.

    Everyone’s a winner … except us 🙁

    EDIT: Added another link.

  34. ‘Tman says:
    Tuesday, July 26, 2022 at 9:24 am

    For anybody cheering the defunding of the ABCC before it has been legislatively abolished, I encourage you to read this article which I think sums up nicely how problematic a position that is.

    https://amp.smh.com.au/public-service/the-slow-death-of-the-office-of-the-australian-information-commissioner-20150826-gj81dl.html

    To give a preview:

    When executive action has “the effective result of emasculating a statutory body”, it is clear that “the wall of protection separating the executive from the legislature has been breached”.’
    —————————————————–
    You would, no doubt, be thinking about the police investigation into the criminal abuse of same by Minister Cash or her Office? The investigation in which Minister Cash refused to answer police questions? That one?

    Another one for FICAC?

  35. Thanks as always BK for your tireless roundup.

    This idea attracted my attention.
    “…when MPs emphasise the primacy of their own electorates, the unity of the nation is overlooked, writes Mark Sawyer.”
    https://michaelwest.com.au/triumph-of-the-teals-a-media-love-in-rolls-on/

    That was a new idea, that too many independents who espouse interest in their electorate above that of the nation dilute the unity of the nation as a whole. I read the article eagerly, and I was disappointed. Nowhere is that idea explored. What is explored is the idea that “Teals” are over-hyped, which point is made well.

  36. Builders build
    Blockers block
    Wreckers wreck
    Whingers whinge.

    Well done, Labor! For the first time in a decade we get some positive movement on climate change.
    Ten years of Wreckers, Blockers and Whingers gone to waste at great cost to all Australians.

    It is Time!

  37. “Welcome to Country ceremony” is very good this morning.
    Albanese speach at the Ceremony is very important, good and moving.

  38. A random thought on “the Teals” popped, that they are merely something new to write about. As a journalist it must be a grind to write an opinion piece or an astute analysis every day or so, going over the same tired ground again and again. “The Teals” are still incompletely unexplored, and so we’ll continue to hear of them. But like Lambie, individual Teals will need something to sustain that level of interest in the years ahead. Some will. Some wont.

  39. Late Riser

    The House Teals represent 6/176 seats, have no power, and have already been OBE. Labor is taking the lead on women’s issues, on climate and on corruption busting. It turns out that the Same Old Same Old was a Big Lie.

    Those running certain agendas will continue to use the Teals as an entry point. The Teal Gazette in particular gives them a totally disproportionate amount of print space.


  40. Late Risersays:
    Tuesday, July 26, 2022 at 8:48 am
    Regarding the “sleeping US DOJ”, and I’ve posted this link before, Marcy Wheeler gives a run down of what the DOJ have been doing to “Trumpworld” since Garland took the reins.

    https://www.emptywheel.net/2022/07/16/what-doj-was-doing-while-everyone-was-whinging-doj-wasnt-doing-anything/
    https://www.emptywheel.net/about/

    I’m inclined to believe that the “do nothing DOJ” is a fabrication, designed (or evolved) to garner outrage or at the very least to generate daily interest among people who are one or more steps removed from the legal process. What Garland has been doing is the classic mobster takedown, aided by the more public J6C theatre. (Murdoch may be throwing in the towel. We’ll see.)

    If Murdoch and Fox channel can somehow be ensnared in Criminal net by DOJ the world will be better off.

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