New year news: Gilmore, Pearce, Mayo

The Liberals get candidates sorted in two key seats, while a poll suggests Rebekha Sharkie has little to fear in Mayo.

First up, please note two other important posts above and below this one: the former asking for money, the latter offering an opportunity for on-topic discussion about the Senate election to mark the happy occasion of the publication of my new Senate election guide, complementing the already published seat-by-seat guide to the House.

With that out of the way, three new items of federal election news to ring in the new year:

• State MP Andrew Constance is now effectively confirmed as the Liberal candidate for the key seat of Gilmore on the New South Wales South Coast, which forms a major part of the government’s re-election strategy given its hope that Constance can recover a seat that was lost in 2019. His main rival, Shoalhaven Heads lawyer Paul Ell, withdrew from the race last week, saying he had formed the view that Constance was best placed to win, a view that was backed by a Liberal source quoted in the Sydney Morning Herald based on party polling. Others to withdraw over the past fortnight were Jemma Tribe, a charity operator and former Shoalhaven councillor, and Stephen Hayes, a former RAAF officer and staffer to Christopher Pyne, who said he was concerned he would face Section 44 issues due to his business dealings with the government.

• The Liberal candidate to succeed Christian Porter in the northern Perth seat of Pearce is Linda Aitken, a nurse and Wanneroo councillor who has run unsuccessfully three times for the state seat of Butler. Peter Law of The West Australian reports Aitken won a ballot of local party members ahead of Miquela Riley, a former navy officer who ran unsuccessfully for the state seat of Fremantle in March, by 31 votes to 23. Aitken is a member of the Victory Life Church, founded by tennis champion and noted social conservative Margaret Court. Riley had conservative credentials of her own, with earlier reports suggesting she had support from The Clan, the factional group that achieved notoriety after an extensive WhatsApp discussion between its principals was leaked to the media.

• Elizabeth Henson of The Advertiser reports a uComms phone poll of 828 respondents for the Australia Institute suggested Centre Alliance MP Rebekha Sharkie to be headed for another comfortable win in her Adelaide Hills seat of Mayo, with a 58.5-41.5 lead over the Liberals on two-party preferred, compared with her 55.1-44.9 winning margin over Liberal candidate Georgina Downer in 2019. The primary vote figures quoted are 30.9% for Sharkie, 30.8% for the Liberals, 13.3% for Labor, 7.7% for the Greens, 6.5% for One Nation, 3.3% for the United Australia Party and 3.0% for independents, with the spare 4.5% presumably being undecided. As reported on the Australia Institute website, the poll also found overwhelming support for an integrity commission and truth in political advertising laws.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

3,489 comments on “New year news: Gilmore, Pearce, Mayo”

Comments Page 62 of 70
1 61 62 63 70
  1. WeWantPaul @ #3012 Wednesday, January 5th, 2022 – 10:14 am

    The wedding cake alternative vendors example is very misleading. As soon as it is lawful to discriminate against people based on lawful behaviour then all four / five / twenty bakeries can discriminate. Those that don’t can then charge a premium, etc etc.

    Pretty much that.

    A person should be able to reasonably assume that they can enter a business and then exit with some of whatever that business sells. We’re not really talking edge-cases where they’re habitually disruptive to the business, or where what the business sells is elaborate, bespoke contract work and they’ve been slammed by excessive demand, or where everyone else just panic-bought all the toilet paper so now there’s none left for anyone. We’re talking more like should someone be able to walk into a grocery store and walk out with some groceries (assuming they pay for them, are happy to take whatever is still in stock, etc.), and not be turned away because “sorry, no gays” or “sorry, no blacks”, etc..

    Hard to argue that they shouldn’t be. Or that they’re the ones being deliberately provocative simply for attempting to patronize a business. Saying it’s okay for any one business to discriminate on spurious grounds, such as race or sexual orientation enables perverse outcomes that would need to be dealt with if they actually occurred. Since no one seems to be saying that those outcomes wouldn’t be dealt with, or even that they’d be dealt with by anything other than legally preventing the discrimination, it’s simpler to just…oppose spurious discrimination in the first place?

  2. On a day when over 60,000 Australians will have been reported as having contracted Covid, of whom about 1800 will require hospitalisation and of whom about 200 will likely die, with more tomorrow, more the day after that, until over a million more Australians are infected, another 30,000 hospitalised and thousands dead, I do not think that Djokovic is the most important issue going at the moment. For what it’s worth, my opinion is that if he is unvaccinated without a valid exemption, he should not have been let into the country except under exceptional circumstances. Playing tennis isn’t one of them. That’s all I’ll say on that particular matter.

  3. “Hard to argue that they shouldn’t be. Or that they’re the ones being deliberately provocative simply for attempting to patronize a business. Saying it’s okay for any one business to discriminate on spurious grounds, such as race or sexual orientation enables perverse outcomes that would need to be dealt with if they actually occurred. Since no one seens to be saying that those outcomes wouldn’t be dealt with, or even that they’d be dealt with by anything other than legally preventing the discrimination, it’s simpler to just…oppose spurious discrimination in the first place?”

    spot on

  4. Do people seriously prefer the Vic Health Minister to personally rule on medical exemptions for the AO …?

    Sorry, but an Independent panel of medical experts is the proper process to establish for that, in my humble opinion. Blaming Dan is just irrational and nonsensical.

  5. It has been reported that the people applying for exemptions are incognito to the panel. Business reps have been flying in and out constantly. What do their exemptions rest on?

  6. a r –

    Saying it’s okay for any one business to discriminate on spurious grounds, such as race or sexual orientation enables perverse outcomes that would need to be dealt with if they actually occurred.

    But what we’re talking about here – wedding cakes for a gay couple, and the specific example in the real world of this – is trying to use the law to force a specific business to make something that they (the people operating the business) didn’t want to make, when the couple in question could easily have obtained exactly what they wanted for a reasonable price somewhere else.

    If there isn’t a problem with a systemic denial of rights to cake manufacture, then why should we be using the power of the state to stand over people and force them to do things they don’t want to do?

  7. Steve777 @ #3057 Wednesday, January 5th, 2022 – 11:50 am

    On a day when over 60,000 Australians will have been reported as having contracted Covid, of whom about 1800 will require hospitalisation and of whom about 200 will likely die, with more tomorrow, more the day after that, until over a million more Australians are infected, another 30,000 hospitalised and thousands dead, I do not think that Djokovic is the most important issue going at the moment. For what it’s worth, my opinion is that if he is unvaccinated without a valid exemption, he should not have been let into the country except under exceptional circumstances. Playing tennis isn’t one of them. That’s all I’ll say on that particular matter.

    Unless you have a close relative on their death bed in Australia, I don’t know how you get an exemption to enter Australia if you’re unvaxxed.

  8. Themunz at 11:52 am
    SfM’s plan is to follow them down the gurgler. The LNP have been making a lot of strides in that direction. The corruption of good governance is an excellent tool for making people start to lose faith in the system.

  9. Re Djokavic getting an exemption to play in the Australian Tennis Open.

    What a victory for all the various nut job anti vaxx groups around Australia, particularly Victoria where they seem concentrated.

    Talk about a booster shot, well there’s a beauty for these nefarious groups.

    Djokovic will not be able to play a game because the booing in the arena will be unmanageable.

    My thoughts as to why he was granted an exemption?

    Being the arrogant rich prick that he his, he has obviously lawyered up and any attempts to deny him entry to the tournament on whatever dodgy grounds he has compiled in his application will be met with some serious litigation.

    Who’s going to go there?

  10. phoenixRED, Thanks for the rawstory link.

    phoenixRED, C@tmomma
    I posit that Trump’s advisors are embarrassed. They’re telling him, “Don’t do it.” “No-one will come.” “It’s not worth it.” etc. So he cancels and we get to hear his two standard excuses, the media hates him, and the investigation (pick whichever one you want) is unfair. It’s gutless, when you think about it. His followers will feel it even if they don’t rationalise it. He’s well down the transition from scary to pathetic. What is interesting (a little scary) is what might emerge from the turmoil in the power vacuum.

  11. From the Guardian Blog – all good assuming at least one parent is still well enough to look after the child(ren)

    Layla a pediatrician in melbourne is speaking now.

    She said they are seeing an increase in referrals from children in the community.

    “The good news, however, is that there is still a small proportion of children being admitted to hospital.

    “Most of us hope that our kids if they do get COVID get a runny nose, but there will be some quite a significant proportion who will have high fever, vomiting, diarrhoea, blocked nose.

    “They will have significant symptoms for several days.These children can be cared for at home.

    “Unfortunately, we are seeing children who are severely affected… but the majority make a full recovery.”

    She says many children will test positive in the coming days, the majority will be able to be treated at home. Some will become severely sick and need hospital care.

    The best thing parents can do is vaccinate their children.

  12. Children with cancer. I have read that Covid affects anyone with cancer very severely and even with vaccinations they are unable to provide the sort of coverage against Covid that well people get.

  13. Late Riser,
    I also think that the January 6 Committee may have been laying in wait for Trump to incriminate himself with his speech on the anniversary of the Insurrection. Knowing what they do now.

  14. Not trying to be too slight, but the last place I want to get a cake is from someone who doesn’t want to make it for me. Sorry. Pink dollar go elsewhere in the market place.

    Ours had two – male – bower birds on it, in a bower. Made and given with love. It’s like music; it’s whats between the notes that matters.

  15. Been There at 11:56 am

    Re Djokavic getting an exemption to play in the Australian Tennis Open.

    Perhaps tennis has fans in high places to assist with the application ? Josh Boy was pretty keen back in the days before male pattern baldness struck.

  16. ScoMo’s attitude to RATs is equivalent to not supporting Medicare.
    Discuss.

    This is what the Coalition want to do. Number 20 on the IPA’s 75-point wish-list refers: “Means-test Medicare”: https://ipa.org.au/ipa-review-articles/be-like-gough-75-radical-ideas-to-transform-australia.

    What it means is an American style system, with Medicare reduced to a safety net for those on welfare, which will be chronically underfunded. Private rent-seekers will insure the healthy, the sick left to the mercy of the authors of robodebt.

    This is what the Coalition’s major donors want and that’s what they’ll get as soon as it’s politically possible. We’ll find out in the 2023 Budget should the Coalition win in May.

  17. Djokovic will be like the original Melb quarantine decision to use security guards – no one made the decision , it just happened.

  18. Themunz @ #2706 Wednesday, January 5th, 2022 – 11:52 am

    https://www.smh.com.au/world/north-america/what-s-the-plan-australia-needs-to-prepare-for-the-collapse-of-american-democracy-20220103-p59llh.html#comments

    A thought provoking article asking a very big question.

    The debate we need to have.

    You might be interested in listening to this podcast:

    https://podcast.thebulwark.com/evan-osnos-hardening-the-hard-core

    The guy being interviewed, Evan Osnos, was a foreign correspondent in China and Egypt, before returning to America to write for The New Yorker. He has just written a book, ‘Wildland’ from the perspective of putting it all together. His insights are very informative.

  19. Steve777 @ #2721 Wednesday, January 5th, 2022 – 12:10 pm

    ScoMo’s attitude to RATs is equivalent to not supporting Medicare.
    Discuss.

    This is what the Coalition want to do. Number 20 on the IPA’s 75-point wish-list refers: “Means-test Medicare”: https://ipa.org.au/ipa-review-articles/be-like-gough-75-radical-ideas-to-transform-australia.

    What it means is an American style system, with Medicare reduced to a safety net for those on welfare, which will be chronically underfunded. Private rent-seekers will insure the healthy, the sick left to the mercy of the authors of robodebt.

    This is what the Coalition’s major donors want and that’s what they’ll get as soon as it’s politically possible. We’ll find out in the next Budget should the Coalition win in May.

    Who was Social Services Minister? Scott Morrison
    Who was Treasurer? Scott Morrison
    Who went on to run the show now as Prime Minister? Scott Morrison

    Not hard to connect the dots.

  20. Well………35000 cases in a day, when NSW is possibly suffering from a degree of under reporting is a bit of a shock to me. Honestly i though once its up at 25k or so the daily numbers would stabilize and maybe start dropping over the next two weeks.

    So what? Things will basically be utter crap until the end of Jan (with hospitalizations / ICU numbers lagging cases) and then maybe calming down over the first couple of weeks in Feb??

    With W.A. having the 5/2 date to think about i can see that getting postponed IF we have little or no covid circulating and the East is still in the shit.. IF we get a major outbreak before then it depends i would guess on its severity.

    I reckon W.A. would go into at least a couple of weeks serious lock-down IF we got local transmission picking up. The current low levels make that a viable response.

    I have a bit of focus on the politics 🙂 and how this will influence the election this year, but apart from that it really IS a complete omnishambles from the Federal Govt. The National Govt had a responsibility to coordinate and facilitate a National response and they have failed. FFS, they are still flailing around on policy, and being reactive in such fucked up ways. National Cabinet is a joke and really just a platform for Morriscum to pontificate from. Announcements after a meeting are meaningless as the States oft say…fuck you Scomo we will do it differently.

    Hopefully W.A. ‘s 14 cases yesterday was an aberration with a batch all hitting quarantine together??
    Funny, as soon as people see that its not local transmission they relax. 🙂 But, i think we REALLY need that quarantine center in Bullsbrook up and running.

  21. Richard Denniss
    @RDNS_TAI
    ·
    36m
    We have 2 years data showing that Australia’s strong public health restrictions to prevent #covid19 led to strong economic performance. Now we’ve 1 months data showing how letting virus rip means letting the economy lag…dreading next months data #auspol

  22. “Hopefully W.A. ‘s 14 cases yesterday was an aberration with a batch all hitting quarantine together??
    Funny, as soon as people see that its not local transmission they relax. But, i think we REALLY need that quarantine center in Bullsbrook up and running.”

    No not Bullsbrook!

  23. imacca at 12:15 pm

    Well………35000 cases in a day, when NSW is possibly suffering from a degree of under reporting is a bit of a shock to me.

    When I first heard of a prediction of 25,000 a day I was very “Yeah , right.” but jeebus they’ve smashed it out of the park.

  24. I see that one of the usual suspects has put out the Djokochairs this morning, and a few have decided to take a perch. Don’t worry about that ginormous COVIDberg. It even prevents us from having RATs on the ship! 🙂

  25. Today feels like outrage Wednesday, some outrages of which feel manufactured to distract (eg Novaxx Joker) and some of which are earned (eg RATs). So something lighter might be welcome, if you have access to the NYT.
    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/04/opinion/cheeseburger-espresso-expresso.html

    The writer begins.

    We think we know more than those who came before. Our impressions are novel, ours are the way ahead.

    But people way back, despite how quaint they might seem to us now, felt the same way we do. E.L. Doctorow got this just right in “The Waterworks,” set in the Gilded Age in New York City, in which the story’s narrator reminds us early on: “You may think you are living in modern times, here and now, but that is the necessary illusion of every age. We did not conduct ourselves as if we were preparatory to your time. There was nothing quaint or colorful about us.”

    He carries on for 14 more paragraphs, and ends with this.

    The thing to remember is that someone as erudite as Barzun evaluated the word cheeseburger as unwelcome.

    Rarely are our language peeves of a kind that would stand the test of time any better. And that includes supposed concerns about clarity: Some 19th-century pedants once advised that the constructions “the first two” and “the two first” were both potentially correct — but — what you call “the first two” things would have to be ones that form a united pair; otherwise, when simply referring to the first and second things of a series, you were to say “the two first.” For clarity, you see. That peeve came and went, and here we are. It’s the reason for that permissiveness among linguists that perplexes so many.

  26. Great News!

    Morrison’s office have finally finished colour coding marginal electorates, Liberal electorates and Nationals electorates and these will now be getting as many free RATs as they need. Everybody else, as is usual practice for the Morrison Government, can GAGF.
    Morrison has stated that as with carparks, pelmets for motels, swimming pools for elite schools, and clubhouse renovations for golf courses in Liberal electorates, the decisions about where to send RATs are for ministers to make. McKenzie has agreed with this position. Joyce is pleased that free RATs will be sent to rural and regional electorates at double the rate of urban deliveries. ‘I believe in scamming urban taxpayers to the max. It is SOP and BAU for the Nationals.’

  27. @35,000 positives we’re pretty clearly beyond the point of capturing anything close to the total number of infections now in NSW. We’re no longer in any sort of control and it’s hang on for the ride time.

    I’ve given up making political predictions because I’m clearly shit at it, but I really do struggle to see how this unfolding cluster fuck won’t have a couple of percent of the population ditching their previous Liberal support (even if it was only by preference). In 19 I didn’t like the reasoning, but I could understand it.

    It’s long been obvious that Morrison’s only talents are the hiding of important information and the generation and dissemination of bullshit to distract from that which is hidden. They’ve been powerful tools in the arsenal when combined with a media that has been keen to play along and a public that wasn’t viscerally feeling too many negative consequences.

    It certainly looks like Morrison’s backing his ability to blind em all with bullshit again come May, and prior to this last couple of weeks I would have thought he wasn’t completely off his gourd to believe that. But if he doesn’t get some divine intervention soon to make the trajectory of infections and impossibility to get tested reverse I don’t believe even ScoMo grade bullshit can save him.

    Too many people will be too personally affected. And this fuck up is just too on the nose on top of not holding a hose and the vaccine stroll out. It’s just further confirmation of the most damaging criticism of Morrison. A day late and a dollar short. It’s always someone else’s job, it’s always someone else’s fault.

    When the SMH is explicitly calling a Liberal PM’s competence into question you can be sure the idea has escaped the Canberra Bubble and is infecting the populace faster than Omicron and Delta combined.

    If he’s going to pull off miracle 2.0 ScoMo is going to need a new trick I think. At the moment he looks like he’s trying to re fight the last war and is losing.

    I’m sure Libs in marginals and not so marginals will be dismayed at his efforts over RATs. I have long believed if he achieved nothing else Morrison would at least be the first PM since Howard to survive a term in office. Things have the potential to deteriorate so quickly at the moment I am starting to doubt that is as assured as I imagined. This is a party room that has been rewarded for dumping an incompetent leader for an equally incompetent (but less obviously incompetent at that time) PM with another election win twice now. If this continues to go south for much longer I can see plenty in the party thinking they have nothing to lose by trying to make the trick work a third time. And I’m sure if the despair starts to take hold Dutton and Josh are both likely to encourage the thinking that spinning the dice on it again is worth a serious thought or two.

    If you thought the last two years were unpredictable hold onto your hats because we’re playing high stakes now with Morrison having gone all in on let her rip. If he pulls it off he’ll surpass Howard in Liberal folklore. But I fear he’s gonna crash and cause an awful lot of collateral damage in the process.

  28. Asha,

    While agreeing with you that it would be highly unlikely that Harris
    will be elevated to the SCOTUS bench, you don’t necessarily need to be a jurist to achieve high judicial office.

    In our own patch, in ’64 Barwick, the then Attorney, who most thought was a hopeless politician, was appointed by Menzies as Chief Justice of the High Court, succeeding Dixon. And in ’75, Whitlam appointed the then Attorney Murphy as a justice of the HC.

    Other parliamentarians who were appointed to the High Court without any judicial experience were Higgins, McTiernan, Latham.

  29. Boerwar @ #3081 Wednesday, January 5th, 2022 – 9:26 am

    Great News!

    Morrison’s office have finally finished colour coding marginal electorates, Liberal electorates and Nationals electorates and these will now be getting as many free RATs as they need. Everybody else, as is usual practice for the Morrison Government, can GAGF.
    Morrison has stated that as with carparks, pelmets for motels, swimming pools for elite schools, and clubhouse renovations for golf courses in Liberal electorates, the decisions about where to send RATs are for ministers to make. McKenzie has agreed with this position. Joyce is pleased that free RATs will be sent to rural and regional electorates at double the rate of urban deliveries. ‘I believe in scamming urban taxpayers to the max. It is SOP and BAU for the Nationals.’

    Now he can move on to Tim Wilson’s colouring book.

  30. @L’arse:

    “ … I am a humanist .”

    You’re not even a vertebrate, as can be seen by your apologia for the Roman Paedophile Protection Society this morning; particularly your false equivalence with other organisations and institutions (and I concede that many of which are far far far from perfect or even good on this issue) and your ‘a few rotten apples’ canard.

    The simply fact is that for decades, probably centuries, the Catholic Church has institutionally and hierarchically nursed pedophiles within its ranks, protected them, covered up and actively set out to damage – nah destroy – survivors. Not just in Australia; but globally. No other institution compares. Especially not the ALP for fucks sake.

  31. Rex
    “Seems you’re going down the Trumpy style of nonsensical conversation just like your bin buddies Barney and Kakuru”

    No! The bin is a good place. Don’t ruin it by putting LVT in it.

  32. One-time Utah tech entrepreneur and state GOP fundraiser Dave Bateman sent an email to a long list of tech sector executives, elected officials and other state leaders Tuesday claiming “the Jews” are behind the COVID-19 vaccines and part of a “sadistic effort underway to euthanize the American people.”

    “I write this email knowing that many of you will think I’m crazy after reading it,” Bateman wrote in an email sent out early Tuesday morning. “I believe there is a sadistic effort underway to euthanize the American people. It’s obvious now. It’s undeniable, yet no one is doing anything. Everyone is discounting their own judgment and dismissing their intuition.

    “I believe the Jews are behind this.”

    https://www.ksl.com/article/50322235/utah-tech-boss-and-gop-fundraiser-says-covid-19-vaccines-an-extermination-plot-by-the-jews

  33. ItzaDream says:
    Wednesday, January 5, 2022 at 10:35 am
    max @ #2958 Wednesday, January 5th, 2022 – 10:12 am
    max, as you’re on the board, I’d really appreciate a link to that Conversations with Norman Swann, whom I enjoy and respect, where you say he speaks about Andrews time in Vic Health. This one is the most recent I can find, and this goes back to June 2021, but nothing referencing Andrews time as Vic Health Minister that I can pick up.

    My previous ask slipped past you. Thanks in advance.
    —————
    No worries Itzadream. Apologies I missed the previous request- and I nearly missed your one today. I checked and it was Big Ideas rather than the Conversations podcast.

    It was an episode about trust in science from 1 November that you can find at the link below with the comments around the 44 min mark. It was a recording of a forum chaired by Norman Swan:

    https://podcasts.apple.com/au/podcast/big-ideas/id164330831?i=1000540092758

    Listening to it now, the point he made was a little different than I’d recalled. He does express the view that Victoria fared worse than other States owing to deficiencies in its public health and hospital system but does not attribute those deficiencies to Andrews’ performance as Health Minister in 2009. (And without knowing much about it, and this isn’t said in the podcast, if I recall correctly, some attribute the origins of many of those problems to decisions made in the Kennett era. Mind you the ALP had been in power for a decade by 2009, which is when the events referred to by Swan occurred, so I think blaming Jeff would be well past its use by date.)

    What Swan says, in the context of the 2009 flu epidemic when Andrews was minister, is that the hollowing out of the system was exposed and that the department ran up the white flag on trying to control the outbreak. That is, the department and the minister had 11 years’ advance notice before COVID of their inability to control an epidemic/pandemic. The failure to remedy those problems left Victoria exposed in 2020 in a way other States weren’t.

    The real point that Swan is making is that in a crisis people want to feel protected by a strong authority figure – ie and that openness to science and facts gets distorted by squishy human stuff. When Swan, as a journalist, pointed out this history, he said people in Victoria didn’t want to know about it.

    He was not particularly critical of the Andrews government’s handling of COVID generally and in my experience Swan is a straight shooter. He has made withering criticisms of the Federal and NSW governments’ management of. COVID. And for clarity nor am I on balance critical of Andrews. I think he showed strong leadership, and although it’s not fashionable, I would cut all of our political leaders some degree of slack in the pandemic response esp in the early stages, acting on incomplete and sometimes contradictory information in a crisis setting (but I think they are properly held accountable for many poor decisions since).

    I do think that some of the ideologically based adulation of Andrews was and is over the top and is not a positive feature of our political culture.

    Anyway have a listen. Cheers

  34. What we really need is for sprockets to come on and spell out the party line re Novak. There’s been way too much confusion about what to think and feel about this issue atm.

  35. Lars Von Trier says:
    Wednesday, January 5, 2022 at 12:42 pm

    What we really need is for sprockets to come on and spell out the party line re Novak. There’s been way too much confusion about what to think and feel about this issue atm.
    ________________
    Good point. Without a strong party line the Stooges are prone to go off tap.

  36. There were pandemic red flags in the early to mid 2000s that forced local governments, and state government departments, and presumably commonwealth departments to prepare pandemic response plans.

    Of course they were never funded and the one I was involved in wasn’t even pulled off the virtual shelf and dusted down, it was easier to pretend they’d never been done. One of the joys of ‘light’ Government in our neo-feudal late capitalism world.

  37. Barney
    “Now he can move on to Tim Wilson’s colouring book.”

    This Tim Wilson colouring book is great fun! At the moment I’m deciding what shade of blue to colour his tie.

    Plus (as a taxpayer who payed for it) I think it’s really good value. I’m glad my taxes pay for these sort of essentials, rather than frivolities like free rapid antigen tests.

  38. Trump canceled Jan. 6 event as ‘it was becoming clear he wasn’t likely to get live TV coverage’: Maggie Haberman

    According to Maggie Haberman of The New York Times, one of the reasons for the cancelation is that Trump’s advisors and associates privately told him that the press conference would be a mistake — and that he would probably not get his event covered live, something that he reveled in throughout his TV career and as president.

    https://www.rawstory.com/trump-speech-on-january-6-2656222134/

Comments Page 62 of 70
1 61 62 63 70

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *