Pearce off

Important Liberal preselections loom in Christian Porter’s seat and, by all accounts, Greg Hunt’s. Also: voter identification laws off the table for now.

A lot of news at the moment concerning matters pertinent to this blog, with Christian Porter announcing yesterday he will not contest the election, Greg Hunt universally expected to follow suit with today’s last parliamentary sitting day of the year, and voter identification legislation scuttled after a deal between government and opposition.

Annabel Hennessy of The West Australian reports a nominee has already come forward for Liberal preselection in Christian Porter’s loseable northern Perth seat of Pearce: Miquela Riley, a former naval officer and current PwC Australia manager who performed a thankless task as the party’s candidate for Fremantle at the March state election. Other potential nominees identified are Libby Lyons, former director of the Australian Government’s Workplace Gender Equality Agency, and Alyssa Hayden, who held the state seat of Darling Range from 2018 until her defeat in March and was earlier in the Legislative Council from 2009 to 2017.

• The most widely named successor to Greg Hunt as Liberal candidate for the Victorian seat of Flinders is Zoe McKenzie, an NBN Co director and former chief-of-staff to Abbott-Turnbull government Trade Minister Andrew Robb. The Age reports other potential starters are Mark Brudenell, chief-of-staff at Latitude Financial and former adviser to Malcolm Turnbull as both Communications Minister and Prime Minister, and Simon Breheny, former Institute of Public Affairs policy director.

• A deal between government and opposition has resulted in the abandonment of plans to introduce voter identification at the coming election. In exchange, Labor has agreed to support a bill that will halve the expenditure threshold at which third parties will have to file disclosure returns, over the objections of critics who argue the associated red tape will discourage charities from political campaigning. It appeared unlikely the voter identification bill would have gained the required votes in the Senate, with Jacqui Lambie having announced yesterday she would vote against it.

• Meanwhile, the Liberal Democrats are pursuing a High Court action against recently enacted legislation that will prevent parties other than the main ones having words like Liberal and Labor in their name. Absent a favourable outcome, this will presumably result in formal challenges against the Liberal Democrats and the New Liberals, the latter of whom have withdrawn their application to change their name simply to TNL.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,183 comments on “Pearce off”

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  1. “The last branch I was a member of was controlled by the left. ”

    ***

    I was never officially a paid member of the Labor Left but certainly considered myself from that side of the party when I voted for Labor. That was back when I lived in Canberra though – the ACT Labor Right aren’t as bad as some of the other Labor Right branches. The same could be said for ACT Labor as a whole actually.

  2. “It is a good practical policy that can be implemented if Labor get into government, they have a chance.”

    If by good practical policy you mean consistent with 3+ degrees of warming and unbelievable death and suffering. Yeah you are right on the money.

  3. Taylormade @ #997 Friday, December 3rd, 2021 – 6:15 pm

    Rex Douglassays:
    Friday, December 3, 2021 at 4:20 pm

    Jane Garrett the latest exit from the Andrews Government.

    Daniel Andrews will have a fresh and re-invigorated team to govern Victoria for the next decade.
    _____________________
    She was always on borrowed time after Andrews decided to side with Marshall when he threatened to slit her throat.

    Andrews sided with Victorians by getting rid of useless and dangerous CFA office powertrippers who were responsible for disasters such as Black Saturday and Fiskville.

  4. ItzaDream @ #998 Friday, December 3rd, 2021 – 6:17 pm

    This is the sort of laughable crap Sharma sends out.

    It has been a busy past sitting fortnight in Parliament, with issues discussed and debated including the new Omicron COVID-19 variant, combatting online trolling on digital platforms, stabilising the Solomon Islands, mitochondrial disease, and the proposed religious discrimination legislation.

    At least he got the name of the legislation correct.

    Sharma is about as believable as Morrison and Matthew Guy.


  5. WeWantPaul says:
    Friday, December 3, 2021 at 6:22 pm

    “It is a good practical policy that can be implemented if Labor get into government, they have a chance.”

    If by good practical policy you mean consistent with 3+ degrees of warming and unbelievable death and suffering. Yeah you are right on the money.

    A magnitude better than a few more empty stunts from the Greens; and denial from the Liberals.

    On another topic. A Labor politician has thought about the issue enough to write a book. That requires a little more effort than the process required to come up with another stunt:

    Event description

    The Commission for the Human Future is proud to host a public discussion with the Hon Dr Andrew Leigh MP on his latest book, What’s the Worst That Could Happen?: Existential Risk and Extreme Politics. He will be joined by Dr Luke Kemp to discuss the greatest challenges facing humanity and the role of politics in responding to them.

    About the speakers:

    Andrew Leigh is the Shadow Assistant Minister for Treasury and Charities, and Federal Member for Fenner in the ACT. Prior to being elected in 2010, Andrew was a professor of economics at the Australian National University. He holds a PhD in Public Policy from Harvard, having graduated from the University of Sydney with first class honours in Arts and Law. Andrew is a past recipient of the Economic Society of Australia’s Young Economist Award and a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Social Sciences. His most recent book, What’s the Worst That Could Happen? Existential Risk and Extreme Politics, was released in November 2021. Andrew is a keen triathlete and marathon runner, and hosts a podcast called The Good Life: Andrew Leigh in Conversation, about living a happier, healthier and more ethical life.
    Dr Luke Kemp is a researcher at the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk at the University of Cambridge, and a former lecturer at our own Australian National University. His current research looks at both the past (civilization collapses) and the future (climate change and emerging technologies) to guide policy in the present. https://www.cser.ac.uk/team/luke-kemp/

    The event will be free and fully online. The link to the webinar will be provided ahead of the session.

    To make sure you don’t miss out on future events like this, you can also sign up for our newsletter at https://www.humanfuture.net/

  6. Firefox,
    1. Needs to be phased out.

    So given the Greens want to phase out coal as soon as possible and cut emissions by 75% by 2030, how will the Greens support steel-making in Australia, when in the short-term there is not a viable alternative to the use of coal for fuelling blast furnaces?

    2. Same as above where possible, depends on what it is though.

    If you don’t support mining in general, then how do you propose that wind turbines, solar panels, batteries, and other essential components of renewable energy be manufactured?

    There is wide info available online regarding the American Green New Deal. the Greens’ Green New Deal… not so much, beyond the superficial. And yes, I read your link.

  7. We all know that pricing greenhouse emissions in some form is the best way to drive them down, hastening the replacement of fossil fuels with alternative, non-emitting or low-emitting alternatives. However, the climate action well is so poisoned that only a niche party like the Greens can advocate it. Labor could promise 50% reduction by 2030. Why not 200% by 2022? Whatever, to implement anything you have to be in Government.

    Our best chance is to nudge things in the right direction for now. Labor can do this. The Greens can’t. The Coalition won’t.

  8. Sharma is obviously on the outer.
    As far as I can see, wasn’t gifted a Dixer during question time.
    Some of those other puddings such as Falinski and Fiona Martin, on the other hand (my local member), had a couple of soft full tosses to lob during QT this week.
    Interesting.

  9. I give you the Vic Libs…

    Richard Willingham
    @rwillingham
    ·
    49m
    A motion at this weekend’s Vic Liberal State Council calls for the ABC in metro areas to become an opt-in subscription service… but leave ABC in the regions. ⁦
    @abcmelbourne

  10. Albanese says we can’t replace steelmaking coal. But we already have green alternatives

    Despite a wealth of evidence to the contrary, some still propagate the myth that the world will need Australian coal for decades to come. Last weekend Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese joined in, saying thermal and metallurgical coal mining and exports would continue after 2050, even with a net zero emissions target.

    Metallurgical coal (or “coking coal”) is mined to produce the carbon used in steelmaking, while thermal coal is used to make steam that generates electricity.

    Albanese argues there’s no replacement for metallurgical coal, but this is not the case. The assertion stems from a fundamental misunderstanding of modern steelmaking, and places Australian manufacturers at risk of missing out on massive opportunities in the global shift to a low-carbon economy.

    Just as thermal coal can be replaced with clean energy from renewables, we can use low-emissions steel manufacturing to phase out metallurgical coal.

    https://theconversation.com/albanese-says-we-cant-replace-steelmaking-coal-but-we-already-have-green-alternatives-126599

    There’s a lot more to that article, worth a read if you have time.

  11. Firefox
    Yes there are green alternatives. Australia’s job is to make it happen, not destroy steel making by refusing to mine what is currently a essential ingredient. Big on policies to destroy, where is your policy to build the future? Boy the Greens are shallow thinkers?

  12. I know noncoal steel is existing technology, but I do not know how far off the money it is. Albo really should be either better informed or more honest.

  13. Labor aims high but not too high on climate
    Anthony Albanese is no longer a “small target” on climate. But he’s not a big one either.

    Jacob Greber
    Jacob Greber
    Senior correspondent
    Dec 3, 2021 – 5.41pm

    Save

    Share
    Labor is the only party in Australia today with a credible climate policy.

    Despite the low bar set by more than a dozen years of political warfare and leadership destruction, Anthony Albanese and Chris Bowen will take to the next election a plan that creates a meaningful differentiation from the Coalition, without being crazy brave.

    They are no longer a small target. But they’re not a big one either.

    Opposition leader Anthony Albanese, right, and climate change minister Chris Bowen have won support from business. Jamila Toderas

    Threading a tricky policy and political needle, Labor has already won over the support of business, big and small, and has the implicit backing of most smart economists.

    And while they’ll never admit it publicly, many inside the Liberal Party are on the same page as Labor on what it takes to drive the staggering transformation required to reach net zero emissions by 2050.

    Advertisement
    To be sure, Albanese and Bowen are taking a big political gamble, opening themselves up to an inevitable cost-of-living scare campaign. Already they are being accused of imposing a stealth tax on agriculture and coal.

    But both men have shaped Labor’s policy around the belief that Scott Morrison’s shrinking public integrity means his cries of outrage will fall flat. They implicitly believe the next election won’t be a repeat of 2019, when the Prime Minister successfully framed Labor as climate radicals.

    Business backs safeguard mechanism
    The biggest roll of the dice is Labor’s decision to adopt a market-based solution to the vexing problem of getting emissions down across an economy in a manner that doesn’t annihilate jobs and industries overnight, as would happen under the Green’s plan to cut emissions 75 per cent by the end of this decade.

    On the other side, Morrison and his climate change minister Angus Taylor are locked into a purist “hands-off” approach that relies entirely on technology to drive emissions cuts. Few, particularly outside the world of outright climate deniers, believe such a “carrot-only” approach can work.

    “Labor’s plan paints a path towards net zero by helping to give businesses the certainty they need to get on with the work they’re already doing and do even more,” said Jennifer Westacott, chief executive of the Business Council of Australia.

    “In particular, we welcome the use of the existing safeguard mechanism and the Climate Change Authority to set emission budgets.”

    Westacott commended Labor for putting the country on a more ambitious 2030 pathway, by promising to cut emissions by 43 per cent this decade from 2005 levels. The Coalition’s plan is to cut emissions by between 26 per cent and 28 per cent.

    “By getting the heavy lifting done earlier with a strong 2030 target we can avoid a steep tail with higher costs and work on closing the technology gap in harder to abate sectors.”

    Labor’s plan adopts the government’s approach as the core of the 2030 net zero strategy, with technology improvements accounting for 23 per cent of the forecast emissions reduction.

    Another 30 per cent of the strategy hinges on further falls in electricity and industrial emissions as well as a tiny sliver from lower transport pollution – the one area where Labor arguably squibbed any real change by failing to address vehicle CO2 standards and accelerate EV imports.

    Inevitably, questions will be raised about who ultimately pays for those changes.

    Bowen insists consumers will be spared because energy will become cheaper, which begs the question: why bother with a pain-inducing safeguard mechanism if it’s likely to happen in any case?

    In reality, there’s no getting around the likelihood that costs for some things must go up. Companies that pollute will need to spend money on new technology, or purchase offsets from those that have cut emissions, or think about going out of business. Not all of that is good news for consumers.

    A glimpse of potential cost
    Labor’s modelling of the Bowen plan, by RepuTex Energy, assumes companies that are captured by the safeguard mechanism will be forced to purchase offsets at price that will rise from $16.94 per tonne in 2021 to $24 per tonne in 2050.

    The latter is the same figure as the government’s in its net-zero plan, even though it only delivers 85 per cent of the reduction in emissions targeted by mid-century. Morrison and Taylor are counting on future hitherto undiscovered technological breakthroughs enabling the missing reductions.

    The government’s modelling, as revealed by The Australian Financial Review last month, implies that absent those technological free kicks, a carbon price of around $80 would be needed to reach net zero by 2050.

    The $56 difference, between $80 and $24, offers a glimpse of the potential cost of Labor’s safeguard mechanism.

    And to be clear: the Coalition has sought to dodge that cost by offering up a plan that falls 15 per cent short of the mid-century target.

    How much of this resonates with voters will soon become clear.

    If Albanese and Bowen are right – and 2022 will not see a repeat of 2019 they’ll be hoping to host in Australia the UN climate summit in 2023 – or COP29 as it will be known. If not, politics will have trumped policy once again.

    Jacob Greber writes about politics, economics and business from Canberra. He has been a Washington correspondent and economics correspondent. Connect with Jacob on Twitter. Email Jacob at jgreber@afr.com

  14. “Jane Garrett the latest exit from the Andrews Government.

    Daniel Andrews will have a fresh and re-invigorated team to govern Victoria for the next decade.”

    Realistically she should have exited last state election by not getting a state upper house seat at all. She put herself ahead of the party by not recontesting the seat of Brunswick and virtually handing it to the Greens. And she would have won if she had recontested it too.

  15. “Big on policies to destroy, where is your policy to build the future? Boy the Greens are shallow thinkers?”

    ***

    No, not destroy, we need to change the way we do things and look for cleaner and greener alternatives wherever possible. We need to transform and advance our country. That’s the goal.

    If you want all the details on how we plan to do that, see here: https://greens.org.au/recovery

    And here’s the more detailed PDF version of the TGND recovery plan: https://greens.org.au/sites/default/files/2020-05/Greens-Recovery-Plan.pdf

  16. Oh dear, the verbal stoushing is on again between The Greens, the “Labor Left” and other in-betweens here in PB after Labor unveils its Climate Challenge policy.
    “Not good enough, not enough, Lab/ Lib lite, you said,he said “.
    We’ve heard it all before.
    For Dog’s sake! We’ve got to make a start somewhere.
    Today Labor announced what appears to be a cogent, practical and realistic policy on climate change and its various related issues. As usual with any policy, the devil is in the detail.
    It’s emissions reduction numbers by 2030 is a start. But as its been said, its other policies are what is important.
    For starters-it is as plain as the nose on your face that Australia’s electricity network is obsolete and requires massive funding to upgrade it to service the present and future needs. “Rewiring the Nation ” is practical,essential and forward -thinking. Note Observers comments earlier in this blog. Progressive Victoria showing the way again.
    Sure the targets and parts of the content of the Policy will incur the displeasure of the aforementioned groups but this policy is a solid start.
    Contrast it with the “nothing- burger ” from the COALition and the dramatic but unrealistic expectations of The Greens.
    This nation is conservative towards change. The idealistic policies of The Greens ,while they are rooted in the heart, will not be viewed as practical by a conservative electorate.
    I have long followed the development of The Greens in Germany. It seems that they have matured as a potent, pragmatic, political entity over the years.
    I hope our Greens do so, and soon, so that voters have more choices in their vote.
    Till then, Labor fills the void. It will attempt to bridge the gap between conservative expectations, unrealistic expectations and a “do – nothing and hope it goes away” reactionary current Federal Government.
    It’s a start.

  17. Firefox I follow the link

    THE GREENS ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN

    A government-backed Jobs and Income Guarantee to help create hundreds of thousands of jobs and ensure everyone has an income they can live on. No one left behind.

    Bold government investment in manufacturing and sustainable infrastructure to create new jobs & opportunities and build the foundations of a fair, clean economy.

    Massive government investment in services for our communities – health, education, childcare, aged care, housing and public services to improve everyone’s lives.

    And to support young people, our “Next Gen Guarantee” will give you free education, an income you can live on, or a guaranteed job on one of our exciting, planet-saving and nation-building projects. It’s up to you.

    I am disappointed, no free unicorn.

  18. WeWantPaul @ #978 Friday, December 3rd, 2021 – 6:22 pm

    “It is a good practical policy that can be implemented if Labor get into government, they have a chance.”

    If by good practical policy you mean consistent with 3+ degrees of warming and unbelievable death and suffering. Yeah you are right on the money.

    Okay then smart arse. Why don’t you stand for election and try and get the policies you think are necessary, to be accepted by a majority of people, in a majority of seats? Until then, all you have is hot air. As does the planet because it’s people like you that love nothing more than blowing Labor up and blowing up the possibility that anything realistically possible and meaningful will be done by a federal government about Climate Change. And whether you are a member of the ALP or not, is irrelevant. It’s on the membership card-as a member of the ALP you pledge to support the policies of the Australian Labor Party.

    I’ve heard your cavilling at Labor policies too many times now, WeWantPaul. And it’s always the same old song. Never. Good. Enough. Well, as I said before, you are one of the lucky ones who never has to worry about putting bread on the table and so you have the luxury, which you freely indulge, of complaining like a sore thumb, that Labor should be doing more. Well, you can do that, but there are 25 million other Australians out there whose concerns have to be addressed as well, and, so far, all you’ve got to offer them is an elitist’s positioning. Well, good luck with convincing people to accept that. Can I give you a hint? You’ve got no hope of convincing a majority of electors, in a majority of electorates across Australia, to accept the sort of policies necessary to drag the warming of the planet down to levels that you would find acceptable. But you’re just too pig-headed to admit that salient and simple fact.

    And I say that as someone who lives at sea level on a road that is being visibly washed away before my eyes by the rising sea level. So excuse me if I choose to support the only political party that is willing to devise a plan that will hopefully gain the approval of a majority of electors, in a majority of seats at the upcoming federal election, so that we might, at last, take the sick and bitterly-contested for political brownie points, politics out of the most gravely serious and catastrophic issue facing the planet today?

    Hopefully you will reconsider your pointless posturing and do so as well.

  19. “slit her throat”

    Is that after all those Liberal types have stuck what they have hanging between their legs down the throats they stick it down?

    So those whose throats have been abused can tell no stories?

    Liberals?

    Don’t you just love them.

    Elitist, sexist and racist.

    And abusive.

  20. Did any of the Greens supporters on here join the convoy up to Central Qld last election, when Bob Brown thought it was a great idea to drive through various towns celebrating people who live there probably losing their jobs as the economy transitions to renewables? That was a great idea. Excellent politics.

    Easy as hell to piss away someone else’s job.

  21. The Shire Liar’s comment on Labor Climate policy” 43% isn’t safe for the Hunter”.. that’s because HIS policy is a FRAUD that he won’t implement… always a Liar, about his policy & about Labor’s policy..

  22. At least one of them is obviously lying:

    The prime minister, Scott Morrison, has denied misleading Australians over Alex Antic’s Covid-19 vaccination status but accepted his assumption the Liberal senator was fully vaccinated has “proved to be incorrect”.

    Antic was taken into hotel quarantine in Adelaide on Thursday night, calling into question the prime minister’s assurances the senator had been double vaccinated.

    Morrison told ABC Adelaide on 26 November that Antic was “double-dose vaccinated” in an interview addressing the senator’s threat to withhold his vote unless the government did more to override state vaccination mandates.

    On Friday, Morrison explained he had been advised Antic was fully vaccinated, adding that he was “disappointed” that he “wasn’t corrected” when he put that to Antic.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/dec/03/liberal-senator-alex-antic-taken-into-sa-hotel-quarantine-and-denies-misleading-pm-on-vaccination

  23. The Greens policy on emissions targets is the only one rooted in science

    The idealism or delusion is thinking that carrying on with no ambition is useful for anyone
    Mostly this announcement seems a distraction from actually addressing the elephant of reducing coal and gas and ending any new projects such as Beetaloo, Scarborough etc

    Can’t see any of the other policies that seem like anything really new, huge or not already advocated by the Greens, Beyond Zero Emissions, Rewiring Australia, EV advocates or many others.

    Adam Bandt Retweeted
    Josh Butler @JoshButler
    https://twitter.com/JoshButler/status/1466546350703529985

    Coalition target: 26-28%
    Coalition projected forecast: 30-35%
    Labor’s new target: 43%
    Labor’s target from 2019: 45%
    Business Council target: 50%
    Climate Council policy: 75%
    Greens policy: 75%

    Climate Council says “the science demands” 75% cut by 2030

    The Climate Council’s Amanda McKenzie gives the Labor policy 6.5 out of 10 on the Project

    The Project noting how Albo, Bowen and Marles all refused invitations to come on and talk up the policy and how the policy was released on a friday afternoon after the very last sitting day of the year
    Just when the political garbage is usually put out and generally indicating that the parties don’t want to talk about it

    Labor’s refusal to turn up and talk up their policy just reinforcing the view that it’s about smothering any discussion instead of standing up for it

    https://twitter.com/theprojecttv/status/1466680684844564480

  24. The Greens policy on emissions targets is the only one rooted in science
    …“the science demands” 75% cut by 2030

    The science doesn’t vote.

    Australians who do vote have rejected extreme policies, whether necessary or not, election after election, no matter what ‘the science says’. Or anthropomorphising it and saying, ‘the science demands’. Especially when no other country in the world is proposing to go that far, to the best of my knowledge, and even if there are those that have, then there have been obstacles to achieving it in reality.

  25. ‘The best job for a coal miner is another mining job’: Adam Bandt looks beyond Melbourne
    https://www.crikey.com.au/2021/10/22/adam-bandt-looks-beyond-melbourne/

    Adam Bandt has a picture of a coal-fired power station on the wall of his Fitzroy office.

    The photo was a thank you gift from workers in the La Trobe valley, who the Greens Leader represented during his past life as an industrial relations lawyer. It’s a surprising choice for the leader of a party often dismissed as representing inner city elites out of touch with the blue collar workers in the resources sector. But speaking to Crikey at the end of another week when Australia’s broken, backward climate politics has been on full display, Bandt wants it known that he is not anti-mining.

    “I’ve been very clear in saying the best job for a coal miner is another mining job. It’s not that we’ve got to shut down the mining industry, it’s just that we’ve got to get out of coal.”

    Instead, Bandt believes mining communities can be at the centre of a just transition toward a renewable economy

    “We’re blessed with the minerals that Australia’s going to need to dig up and process in a zero pollution world. Not only for making our batteries, but for making our green steel,” he says.

    “Those places … [are] the best places for making green hydrogen and making green steel, and creating new export industries.”

  26. “The science doesn’t vote.”

    ***

    That’s one of your “best”, Cat.

    People vote. Some people accept the science of climate change, some do not.

  27. It would only take a few minutes to produce the Greens economic strategy. No one could possibly argue with a wis list like that. But where’s all the money coming from?

  28. The Greens make me sick. Bandt and co are straight into campaigning against Labor, with the obligatory ‘we will hold them to account’ with ‘the balance of power’ – which is rightly perceived to be political blackmail by the 90% of the population who don’t vote for them. Worse – this is fertile ground for a sizeable portion of swinging voters in the genuinely marginal seats (especially outer urban, rural and regional ones) to simply say ‘yeah, nah’ not voting Labor, because we’ll end up with the extreme greens.

    For the Greens they 100% about carving up the progressive rump to their personal political advantage. 0% about growing that rump into something that might actually attract sufficient votes to get 50% plus 1 seats in either chamber.

    Fuck them.

  29. “People vote. Some people accept the science of climate change, some do not.”

    True but not everyone agrees on the same solutions

  30. ”The Shire Liar’s comment on Labor Climate policy” 43% isn’t safe for the Hunter”.. that’s because HIS policy is a FRAUD that he won’t implement… always a Liar, about his policy & about Labor’s policy..”

    Re Climate action
    – The Coalition will do virtually nothing
    – Labor will do something, admittedly half of what is needed, if that.
    – The Greens might promise what has to be done but they won’t be called upon to implement it.

    It is not possible in this country, at least in the context of election campaigning, to have an adult discussion on climate. The only chance of putting Australia on the right path is to install a Labor Government.

    Same-same is crap. Something ÷ Virtually nothing —> ∞. Of the two practical choices available, Labor’s is infinitely better.

  31. “It would only take a few minutes to produce the Greens economic strategy. No one could possibly argue with a wis list like that. But where’s all the money coming from?”

    ***

    For a start, we’d make billionaires pay their fair share and stop giving tax cuts to the rich. We need to get our priorities sorted as a country.

  32. Presumably we will now find out whether Murdoch’s new found enthusiasm for action on climate change is more than just a front for promoting Morrison and the LNP.

    Labor promises $275 cut in power bills at home
    Labor’s climate change policy, which includes a 2030 emissions target of 43pc, will create 600,000 jobs and spur $76bn in investment, Anthony Albanese says.
    By GEOFF CHAMBERS, ADESHOLA ORE, JESS MALCOLM

    What you need to know about Labor’s climate plan
    Anthony Albanese reveals ‘the most comprehensive modelling ever done by an opposition’, as he throws down the gauntlet.
    By GEOFF CHAMBERS, ADESHOLA ORE

  33. Quoll (quoting Bandt)

    “We’re blessed with the minerals that Australia’s going to need to dig up and process in a zero pollution world. Not only for making our batteries, but for making our green steel”

    Good comment from Bandt.

  34. “It’s easy to see how the Greens might wreck a Labor government and give us a swift return to LNP rule. Is that what Greens supporters would like to see?”

    Yes

  35. Huge if true:

  36. Fuck the Greens. Also I’m not sold on the political wisdom of 43%. Labor would have been better off to simply adopt Morrison’s ‘aspiration’ of 35% of a target and talk in vague terms about a path to NetZero2050 to be laid out in a second term. Put the LNP shysters to the word – and I have to say – given this afternoon’s performance briefly is right the political ‘junk’ of the Greens to the sword as well. The best – only way for deeper cuts is to restore faith amongst the 1,500,000 million who abandoned Labor and the Green in early 2011 with the ‘surprise’ carbon ‘tax/not a tax’ announcement that a labor Government can be trusted to NOT go back on its word to accomodate the Greens. In short, labor should have gone with 35% ‘guarantee’, not depart from that in its first term, then pivot to much much greater cuts from 2025 onwards.

    Fuck the Greens.

  37. “For the Greens they 100% about carving up the progressive rump to their personal political advantage. 0% about growing that rump into something that might actually attract sufficient votes to get 50% plus 1 seats in either chamber.”

    ***

    Make no mistake, Labor and the Coalition are the ones being selfish. They’re more than happy for the planet’s future to be put in jeopardy just so they can prop up the dying fossil fuel industry and keep a few wealthy donors happy.

  38. Andrew_Earlwoodsays:
    Friday, December 3, 2021 at 7:51 pm
    Fuck the Greens. Also I’m not sold on the political wisdom of 43%. Labor would have been better off to simply adopt Morrison’s ‘aspiration’ of 35% of a target and talk in vague terms about a path to NetZero2050 to be laid out in a second term. Put the LNP shysters to the word – and I have to say – given this afternoon’s performance briefly is right the political ‘junk’ of the Greens to the sword as well. The best – only way for deeper cuts is to restore faith amongst the 1,500,000 million who abandoned Labor and the Green in early 2011 with the ‘surprise’ carbon ‘tax/not a tax’ announcement that a labor Government can be trusted to NOT go back on its word to accomodate the Greens. In short, labor should have gone with 35% ‘guarantee’, not depart from that in its first term, then pivot to much much greater cuts from 2025 onwards.

    Fuck the Greens.

    +1

  39. Not that it matters, but I voted Greens once and I’ll never do it again. Ever. BUT – if it was a direct contest between them and the LNP, I’d…

    …vote informal and go and get another sausage sandwich.

  40. I think Frednk’s post upthread on this.

    Actually a sensible and reasonable perspective.

    “Read the Labor policy document. The interesting bit is the policy not the reduction aim. It is the interesting the parties that campaign on anger have gone ape-shit over the target and not discussed the merit of the policies.

    Rewiring the Nation
    The ALP will establish a public Rewiring the Nation Corporation and invest $20 billion to modernise
    Australia’s electricity grid.
    Power to the People
    The ALP will invest $200 million to install 400 community batteries around Australia, providing battery storage for up to 100,000 households.
    Solar Banks
    The ALP will commit $100 million for the development of shared ‘solar banks’ to provide access to the benefits of rooftop solar for people who rent, live in an apartment, or cannot afford upfront installation costs.
    Public sector emissions
    The ALP will commit to reduce Australian Public Service emissions to net-zero by 2030.

    There are others including investing in the training of people for the clean energy sector.

    It’s a good strategy, clean easy to articulate policies, let the angry ant act like angry ants.”

    Notice the ALP policy will get on with some underlying much needed stuff? 🙂 Quietly laying groundwork for emissions reductions by building actual real things. Targets, at least legislated ones, are of importance. BUT, the main game right now for Climate Action is to get a party who will actually do something into power, and toss out the ones we know will do nothing.

    The Greens will dump on the ALP rather than attack the Lib/Nats because they want to take votes off the ALP….ok….that’s their thing. But until they show they can, and are willing, to try and take votes off the Libs, then politically they are an impediment to action on climate change.

  41. I was struck by Pavlidis’ contribution to “Cartoon Corner” this morning.
    I never question another’s syntax, grammar, spelling, punctuation other than sometimes questioning paragraph lengths – I’m not singling you out Socrates, dear Andrew also transgresses from time to time, whereas dear Observers’ paras are rather too short.

    That said, something that parliamentary counsel, solicitors, and journos know all too well is that a simple comma is much more than a pause, as a senior academic acquaintance of mine insisted some years ago. Thus you see in contracts of old little or no punctuation – it could result in your head.

    Consider this: “I don’t think I know” that Morrison lies. Then consider this:
    “I don’t think, I know” that Morrison lies. The little old “comma” is arguably the most understated punctuation mark.

  42. All this pathological hatred of the Greens – not a nice way to treat your future coalition partners on Labor’s part?

    Seems pretty clear Labor’s best hope is a minority government – why not show people that a Labor/ Green pact could work and there is nothing to fear from it?

  43. Mavis

    Someone here a week or so ago tried to argue that Macron was saying, “I don’t think I know” — meaning, of course, that Macron didn’t have any idea whether Morrison was lying or not…

  44. Evening all. On Labor’s climatre policy today, I’d give it a B. It isn’t great, but isn’t terrible. Not enough to solve the problem but significantly better than the coalition planphlett.

    Regardless of 43% targets, this was the critical bit:
    “ In electricity, Labor will significantly upgrade transmission infrastructure to hasten the transition to renewables, invest in solar banks and install 400 community batteries. These measures are projected to see renewables make up 82% of power generation in Australia’s national electricity market by 2030, instead of 68% under current projections.”

    If the grid is upgraded and the ability to feed in new RE is increased, Australia should easily beat the 43% reduction in energy emissions.

    My only real disappointment was no car emissions policy, which is 20% of our emissions. Labor needs to look at changing the tax treatments and emission regulations to motivate importers to bring in cheaper EVs.

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