Morgan: 53.5-46.5 to Labor

The fortnightly Roy Morgan poll adds another increment to the rise of “others”, while Scott Morrison’s personal ratings take a knock in Essential Research.

The fortnightly Roy Morgan poll records little change on a fortnight ago, with Labor’s two-party lead at 53.5-46.5, in from 54-46. Both major parties are unchanged on the primary vote, the Coalition at 36.5% and Labor at 35%, with the Greens down two to 11.5% and One Nation down half to 3%. The “others” vote is accordingly up two-and-a-half points to 14%, which is two points higher than in any previous Morgan polls this term. See Mark the Graph for a poll trend that shows how the others vote has ascended by about four points since the start of July – BludgerTrack (freshly updated here) doesn’t feature a trendline for others, which is perhaps something I should look at.

Morgan’s two-party state breakdowns have Labor down since last fortnight by two points in New South Wales, one-and-a-half in Victoria, Queensland and Western Australia and half a point in Tasmania, but up by nine points in South Australia, no doubt reflecting the vagaries of small sub-sample size. Labor leads by 53.5-46.5 in New South Wales, for a swing of around 5.5%; 55-45 in Victoria, around 2%; 53.5-46.5 in Western Australia, around 9%; 57.5-42.5 in South Australia, around 7%; and 57.5-42.5 in Tasmania, around 1.5%. The poll was conducted over the past two weekends from a sample of 2723.

Also out this week was the fortnightly Essential Research poll, which happily included the pollster’s monthly leadership ratings. These suggested that Scott Morrison’s rocky time in Glasgow may have done him some damage, with his approval rating down six to 48% and disapproval up five to 42%, while Anthony Albanese is respectively down one to 40% and up one to 35%. However, this hasn’t flowed through to preferred prime minister, on which Morrison leads 44-28, compared with 45-29 a month ago. Thirty-four per cent said they believed the government deserved to be elected, down two since the question was last asked in August, with 45% signing on for the alternative proposition that it was “time to give someone else a go”, up four.

The poll also finds 47% believe Scott Morrison has undermined Australia’s international reputation compared with 27% who believe he has enhanced it, with 54% rating a good international reputation as important and 39% rating it fairly important. An occasional question on trust in the parties to handle various issues, which interestingly finds the Coalition has taken a knock since September on national security, their lead over Labor down from 13% to 6%, and maintaining international relations, on which a 5% lead has turned into a 3% deficit. Movement on the other issues is slight but mostly negative for the Coalition.

There is better news for the government on COVID-19 management, which is rated good by 48% and poor by 29%, respectively up two and down two on a fortnight ago, and in both cases the best result the government has had since early June. From small state sub-samples, the Victorian government’s good rating is up from 43% to 56%, New South Wales is steady on 57% and Queensland is up three to 62%.

There are also questions on carbon emissions which you can see in the full report. The poll was conducted Wednesday to Sunday from a sample of 1089.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

970 comments on “Morgan: 53.5-46.5 to Labor”

Comments Page 2 of 20
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  1. C@tmommasays:
    Thursday, November 11, 2021 at 6:48 am
    Niki Savva appears to have noticed Phil Coorey’s stenographic efforts:

    So it is not just posters on PB who are noticing it. Maybe a flicker of hope.

  2. Haven’t been keeping up closely with Victoria’s proposed Pandemic legislation, but one question comes to mind. How does it compare with the reams and reams of “security” legislation enacted Federally since 11/9/2001. That widely impinged on common law and legislated rights in the name of protecting the community. Few questioned the need, least of all the current defenders of “freedom” and the mainstream media.

    Covid 19 has killed nearly 1900 Australians. Terrorism has killed… five? ten?


  3. Confessionssays:
    Thursday, November 11, 2021 at 6:49 am
    Niki Savva describes Morrison perfectly! I can no longer watch or listen to him, and wonder how long it’s going to be before he generally becomes regarded as a mere poser and flake.

    Morrison is a walking, talking, weaving, wedging, endlessly posing advertisement for Sean Kelly’s excellent and exquisitely timed book The Game, which forensically dissects the Prime Minister’s character.

    Morrison’s career has been built on self-ghosting. He vanishes an old personality, or an inconvenient event, only to emerge reborn soon after with no regard for, or acknowledgement of, whatever has preceded.

    A prime example. Campaigning on April 7, 2019, he said then opposition leader Bill Shorten wanted to “end the weekend” by forcing Australians to buy electric vehicles that could not tow their trailers or boats to their favourite holiday spot, unlike their SUVs, which they should kiss goodbye.

    Then on Tuesday, surrounded by furiously nodding vulnerable Liberal MPs, sounding like he could do with a battery recharge after garbling out “Anthony Albany”, Morrison denied he had opposed EVs, said it was a Labor lie, and announced an electric vehicle policy. Yesterday never happened.

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/our-walking-talking-weaving-wedging-prime-minister-20211103-p595hk.html

    Niki Savva: Yesterday never happened.

    I tribute to latest Bond movie “No time to die”,
    my response to Niki Savva is “Tomorrow never dies”, where megalomaniac Media Baron is killed by Bond. 🙂

  4. Ven @ #48 Thursday, November 11th, 2021 – 8:14 am


    C@tmommasays:
    Thursday, November 11, 2021 at 6:45 am
    ………………
    Although, going on the past few days efforts, Morrison thinks that making gnocchi, sitting in a barber’s chair and announcing car policy outside the wrong car plant, are now his strong suits.

    Who knew!

    well, not the vast majority of ordinary voters.
    Who still don’t know.

  5. S777

    Haven’t been keeping up closely with Victoria’s proposed Pandemic legislation, but one question comes to mind. How does it compare with the reams and reams of “security” legislation enacted Federally since 11/9/2001. That widely impinged on common law and legislated rights in the name of protecting the community. Few questioned the need, least of all the current defenders of “freedom” and the mainstream media.

    Barely a peep.

  6. BK @ #44 Thursday, November 11th, 2021 – 8:13 am

    Labor is considering backing Scott Morrison’s plans to further invest in the unproven carbon capture and storage technology, potentially blunting a Coalition wedge as the Opposition continues to hammer the government on “lies” about electric vehicles, writes Josh Butler.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/2021/11/10/labor-could-back-carbon-capture/

    I don’t understand this comment, unless it means that the wedge Labor was hoping to use on the Coalition has been blunted? That seems to be the only way it makes sense.

    Those of us who have been following Labor’s climate change policy limbo dance would know that Labor has always been in favor of carbon capture and storage. You can’t possibly have a fossil-fuel friendly policy without at least pretending to believe in CCS.

  7. There is no need to get excited by the US China announcement.

    The only thing that is new is that China has agreed to make a plan to cut its methane emissions by a third. Morrison would be a suitable planner for this ‘intention’ and this ‘plan’, IMO.

    China has around 60 million cattle.
    China’s natural gas production is increasing and with that, presumably, fugitive methane.
    China is the world’s largest paddy rice field producer. This is a major source of methane.
    Fortunately a significant proportion of the cattle are raised in circumstances in which it is reasonable practicable to give them a daily dose of seaweed burp and fart reducer.
    There is probably little that can be done to eliminate fugitive methane from natural gas and coal production.
    There is no current way of reducing methane production from 30 million hectares of artificial wetland methane factory paddy fields.

    The most significant item in the announcement is that it further belittled Johnson and an already diminished ‘global’ Britain.


  8. DisplayNamesays:
    Thursday, November 11, 2021 at 7:01 am
    The Right are the biggest players of identity politics. Every thing they say and write on identity politics is, in fact, them playing identity politics.

    Projection DiplayName projection (like elementary Watson elementary)

  9. In light of announcement by CHINA and the USA on climate policy.

    You gotta say that the PJK NPC address yesterday to discuss strategic engagement and China, was perfectly timed.

  10. “freedom”

    Such as the “freedom” imposed by the National Service Act, sending over 200 Conscripts to their deaths in Vietnam

    And impacting on the mental and physical health of many others

    Murdering hypocrites

    And they stand in the steps of Parliament supporting the anti vaccination absolute minority championing “freedom”

    The Liberal Party and those they court are the reason for the continuing damage being inflicted on citizens by this virus of unknown source

    We are expendable in the face of capitalism, money, ego and power

  11. Victoria @ #60 Thursday, November 11th, 2021 – 8:38 am

    In light of announcement by CHINA and the USA on climate policy.

    You gotta say that the PJK NPC address yesterday to discuss strategic engagement and China, was perfectly timed.

    What are both Labor and the Coalition going to do when they don’t have their spooky little China doll to shake at the voters any more?

  12. China Evergrande Group today again defaulted on interest payments to international investors. DMSA itself is invested in these bonds and has not received any interest payments until today’s end of the grace period. Now DMSA is preparing bankruptcy proceedings against Evergrande and calls on all bond investors to join it.

    China Evergrande Group, the second largest real estate developer in China, defaulted on interest payments on two bonds back in September, with the 30-day grace period still ending in October. However, shortly before the end of the grace period, the public was misled by rumors about alleged interest payments. The international media also took the rumors for granted. Only the DMSA – Deutsche Marktscreening Agentur (German Market Screening Agency) already recognized the default at that time and proved in a study that the bankruptcy of Evergrande, the world’s most indebted corporation, could ultimately lead to a “Great Reset”, i.e. the final meltdown of the global financial system.

    “But while the international financial market has so far met the financial turmoil surrounding the teetering giant Evergrande with a remarkable basic confidence – one can also say: with remarkable naivety – the U.S. central bank Fed confirmed our view yesterday,” says DMSA senior analyst Dr. Marco Metzler. “In its latest stability report, it explicitly pointed out the dangers that a collapse of Evergrande could have for the global financial system.”

  13. The Australian Government are likely to be identified as laggards and have more exposure for their inadequate policies to achieve net zero emissions by 2050 according to this report of the draft of the proposed Glasgow communique.

    Morrison and Co will probably continue to bluster. But, economic punishment is probably on the horizon for recalcitrant Nations like us.

    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/world/2021/11/11/coal-cop26-draft/

  14. P1

    Labor’s 2021 Platform is heavily focused on gas + ccs. The platform criticizes LNP for cutting 480million from CCS programs and commits to funding CCS R&D .

  15. Correction: $460million

    20. Labor will pursue policies which will transform Australia’s established energy-intensive industrial sectors – such as aluminium and steel, as well as the industries of the future such as hydrogen production – so they become global leaders delivering significant jobs, investment and economic diversification and environmental sustainability. We will build on leading strategies from around the world and work with industry and research agencies to adapt our existing LPG pipeline infrastructure to help this industry grow.

    21. Supported by the advice of experts including the Chief Scientist and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Labor recognises the role that Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) will play in abating carbon pollution and ensuring industries like heavy manufacturing and gas production are able to play their role in meeting carbon pollution reduction goals consistent with achieving the goals of the Paris Agreement. Labor’s support, to date, for the development of CCS technologies stands in sharp contrast to the record of the Coalition government which has abolished CCS support programs and cut $460 million in CCS financial support.

  16. Boerwar @ #50 Thursday, November 11th, 2021 – 8:17 am

    Hmmm…. MOE aside, three things draw attention:

    The Greens’ drop during COP26 is, IMO, counterintuitive. Perhaps Morrison has more climate cred than Bandt?
    Who knows?

    Greens are being heavily attacked in the Herald Sun as one of the ‘independents’ that have enabled Dan’s power. Could be part of it

  17. bakunin @ #65 Thursday, November 11th, 2021 – 8:49 am

    P1

    Labor’s 2021 Platform is heavily focused on gas + ccs. The platform criticizes LNP for cutting 480million from CCS programs and commits to funding CCS R&D .

    Yes, I know. That’s why I’m not sure what the “wedge” was supposed to be.

    Was it that the Liberals were not investing enough in propping up the fossil fuel industry?

  18. Without breaking copyright, would a fellow bludger provide a précis of Greg Sheridan’s rumination on PJK’s Press Club appearance please?

  19. I would refer anyone interested to the article penned by Stiglitz and appearing on global media sites

    I wonder if our current pm and federal treasurer could engage in debate with Stiglitz?

    I would suggest they would not be capable – being mere politicians wedded to right wing ideology (and the cause of the problems)

    There are also the impacts in the USA of supply chain driven inflation, driving Bond Yields up and Markets (ex banks) down (as we have seen overnight in the USA)

    Whilst there are “within the day” movements in response to data and the release of data, it is the sustainability of that data which is the focus – noting the Federal Reserve advise the impacts are temporary because the supply chain pressures will not maintain in the medium and longer term

    Data is always historical – the meaningful analysis being trend and the drivers of trend

  20. P1,

    It is definitely confusing. Perhaps the New Daily Journo hasn’t read Labor’s Platform?

    Labor attacking Morrison “lies” about EV’s is slightly baffling, and is a potential “own goal”.
    The coverage of 2019 election indicates that Labor and Liberal had almost identical EV policy – the difference was that Labor set a target of 50%. Morrison’s line of attack was that Labor had cobbled together policy at the last minute, and hadn’t considered the implications.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/apr/07/shorten-wants-to-end-the-weekend-morrison-attacks-labors-electric-vehicle-policy

    The latest stage of the unofficial 2019 federal election campaign has opened with a battle over Australia’s electric car future, with Scott Morrison accusing Bill Shorten of wanting to “end the weekend”.

    In response the Labor leader accused the government of running out of steam on “scare campaigns” and so it had resorted to “scaring you about their own policies”, as the two major parties argue the toss on very similar policies.

    Both the Coalition and the Labor party have policies to increase Australia’s electric car take-up, with the government assuming electric vehicles will make up between a quarter and half of all new car sales by 2030, while Labor has set a target of 50% of all new car sales by the same year.

    But despite the similarities in policy, confirmed by an environment department official during last week’s Senate estimate hearings, the government immediately launched into attacking Labor’s plan as ‘out of touch’.

    “I think the problem with this is, Bill came up with this plan last Monday and it’s clearly not thought through,” Morrison told Sydney radio 2GB on Friday.

    “I mean he reckons that 50 per cent of the cars that we all are driving around in 10 years from now will be electric cars.

    “But the share of the market at the moment is 0.2 per cent. He hasn’t thought through what that means for diesel and fuel excise, that’s around about $11bn a year.

    “Now, if you go and buy an electric car, well obviously you don’t pay the fuel excise, what is that going to mean for that revenue stream and what’s the cost of that?

    “What about all these charging stations, how much is that going to cost? I mean if you have an electric car and you live in an apartment, are you going to run the extension cord down from your fourth floor window?

    “I mean this thing is not thought through and it’s just typical of what we see from Labor; a big goal – a 45 percent emissions reduction target, climate heroes – but the actual detail of it is all fluff.”

    On Sunday, Morrison went further, but pivoted the attack, moving away from criticisms about increasing the number of electric vehicles on Australian roads, which Morrison said he supported, to Shorten personally, for his claim last week that depending on what the original charge is “it can take eight to 10 minutes” to charge a vehicle. “It can take longer,” Shorten said as a qualifier.

    “We don’t have a problem with electric vehicles,” Morrison said on Sunday. “In fact, we’ve been facilitating the development of the technologies.

    “… So look, the point about it is not whether electric vehicles are good or bad. In fact, they have a role to play, increasingly, in the vehicle fleet of Australia over the next decade. The problem here is Bill Shorten doesn’t understand his own policy.

  21. Andrew_Earlwood says:
    Thursday, November 11, 2021 at 9:02 am

    Without breaking copyright, would a fellow bludger provide a précis of Greg Sheridan’s rumination on PJK’s Press Club appearance please?
    ________
    Even though I haven’t read it I do believe I could give an accurate summary of what it contains.

    Paul Keating is in love with the ‘big picture’. I prefer the ‘little picture’ and in that little picture Australia exists as a hemorrhoid of the United States, but a grateful one. The fundamental policy of Australia is the ANZUS/AUKUS alliance. I love the Alliance. I love the United States. I hope they bury me in Arlington cemetery for my good works on their behalf. GOD BLESS AMERICA.

  22. Well, well, well. Who knew that the Chinese and Evergrande were bluffing about meeting interest payments before the deadline?

    Only ol’ ‘Sinophobes’ like me I guess. 😀

  23. Victoria @ #60 Thursday, November 11th, 2021 – 8:38 am

    In light of announcement by CHINA and the USA on climate policy.

    You gotta say that the PJK NPC address yesterrU to discuss strategic engagement and China, was perfectly timed.

    Certainly that’s what they’re all saying out in the western suburbs of Sydney this morning. Apparently everyone’s banging on about it at the Woolies checkouts.

  24. bakunin,
    As you appear to be an evidence-driven person, you do realise that Player One is a shape shifter when it comes to commentary about the best way to deal with Climate Change in Australia? If you could do a word search of their comments and inserted the words ‘Gas Peakers’ into that search you would see how disingenuous Player One actually is.

    Also, do not forget that, at the end of the day, when pencil hits paper, that Player One will put the Liberal Party above Labor. And that is something that the vast majority of Greens’ voters will never do.

  25. bakunin @ #72 Thursday, November 11th, 2021 – 9:13 am

    P1,

    It is definitely confusing. Perhaps the New Daily Journo hasn’t read Labor’s Platform?

    Indeed. The difficulty in trying to discuss policy options on climate change – even here on PB – is that so few people seem aware of Labor’s party platform, and how close to Coalition policy it is in key details. Those who do seem pretty desperate for climate change to not be an election issue – in a “don’t mention the war” kind of way 🙁

  26. C@tmomma @ #77 Thursday, November 11th, 2021 – 9:22 am

    bakunin,
    As you appear to be an evidence-driven person, you do realise that Player One is a shape shifter when it comes to commentary about the best way to deal with Climate Change in Australia? If you could do a word search of their comments and inserted the words ‘Gas Peakers’ into that search you would see how disingenuous Player One actually is.

    Finally you manage to provide convincing evidence that you do not read my posts. Or at least if you do, that you do not understand them.

  27. This is a very perceptive comment to the Rob Harris article:

    The Claw

    The Coalition have been running an Opposition campaign since 2007. Even after winning government eight years ago, they never stopped being the party of opposition, having no shortage of things to say about how terrible Labor are, but absolutely nothing to say about their own achievements in government. Probably because there really haven’t been any.


  28. Victoriasays:
    Thursday, November 11, 2021 at 7:35 am
    The media and the repubs in the USA spend each and every day writing off Biden.
    When all is said and done, he will feature much like FDR did with the new deal.

    I am not sure Victoria because he already lost Virginia and came very close to losing Jersey. (albeit a new one) to a noname.
    With inflation at 6% there are worrying signs he will crash and burn.

  29. A_E
    Re Abbott fanboi . Kicks off with some early picky and petty .

    Paul Keating’s remarks at the ­National Press Club were his now usual combination of gibberish, strategic madness, misrepresentation, prejudice, genuine shafts of insight, and linguistic ­inventiveness.

    He claims China’s economy is bigger than that of the US. Wrong. You only get to that outlandish conclusion if you use the notional purchasing power parity formulation.

    Keating’s role in this was so central that Clinton doesn’t mention Keating in his memoirs at all (though he has warm words for John Howard).

    Getts into gimme big boys toys and big thrusting manly men missiles and gorgeous sexy uniforms

    But let’s be absolutely clear. Australia has no defence force capable of defending ourselves, with no strike capability, no ability to push aggressors away at distance, no war-fighting mass and no discipline in force structure, because we have deliberately chosen not to acquire such a defence force. The Morrison government has continued that pathetic ­national tradition in full………..We have consciously chosen this national impotence. Israel, with an economy about a quarter the size of Australia’s, can provide for its own strategic and tactical security.

    More moaning

    He seems to regard it as necessary to repeatedly insult Japan. His long time ugliness ­towards Japan has no rational explanation.

    He seems now to have added India to the list of ­nations he will routinely slag off.

    His dismissive remarks about Taiwan are chilling

    Then moves on to some Keating sorta kinda little bit right

    Nonetheless, he had two important insights. One is that there is something anomalous in Australia making its central Asian commitment a grouping – AUKUS – which involves Britain but no Asian nation.

    Keating was right to argue that we will need another conventional sub before we get the nukes.

    Keating is right in one larger sense too. This debacle arises from our lack of commitment to, and imagination concerning, Asia.

    Oh and the French are just being hysterical .

  30. “ Paul Keating is in love with the ‘big picture’. I prefer the ‘little picture’ and in that little picture Australia exists as a hemorrhoid of the United States, but a grateful one. The fundamental policy of Australia is the ANZUS/AUKUS alliance. I love the Alliance. I love the United States. I hope they bury me in Arlington cemetery for my good works on their behalf. GOD BLESS AMERICA.”

    Oh nath, all is forgiven: Love your work!


  31. Victoriasays:
    Thursday, November 11, 2021 at 7:46 am
    Fess

    I was very confident that they would win last election.
    This time, I believe enough voters are sick and tired of this mob.

    ,You still underestimate what John Howard has done to the psyche of this country like US commentators underestimate Trump.
    Remember it is easy to be bad or evil and it noble to be good.


  32. There should be Statler and Waldorf assessment of every political speech.
    https://www.barbneal.com/wp-content/uploads/muppets08.mp3
    STATLER: Boo!
    WALDORF: Boooo!
    S: That was the worst thing I’ve ever heard!
    W: It was terrible!
    S: Horrendous!
    W: Well it wasn’t that bad.
    S: Oh, yeah?
    W: Well, there were parts of it I liked!
    S: Well, I liked alot of it.
    W: Yeah, it was GOOD actually.
    S: It was great!
    W: It was wonderful!
    S: Yeah, bravo!
    W: More!
    S: More!
    W: More!
    S: More!

    Or

    Waldorf: That was wonderful!
    Statler: Bravo!
    Waldorf: I loved it!
    Statler: Ah, it was great!
    Waldorf: Well, it was pretty good.
    Statler: Well, it wasn’t bad…
    Waldorf: Uh, there were parts of it that weren’t very good though.
    Statler: It could have been a lot better.
    Waldorf: I didn’t really like it.
    Statler: It was pretty terrible.
    Waldorf: It was bad.
    Statler: It was awful!
    Waldorf: It was terrible!
    Statler: Take ‘em away!
    Waldorf: Hey, boo!
    Statler: Boo!

  33. Forgot to add. Sheridan of course thought Tones was the one who was on the mark .

    Tony Abbott’s strategic vision to partner with Japan, with deep US involvement, in acquiring modern, conventional submarines was right in terms of submarine capability, but also, more important, on deeper strategic grounds.

  34. Gnocchi, barbers and electric vehicles? Seems like someone is worried about losing the blue-ribbon Liberal seats to the Greens (Kooyong, Ryan, Brisbane, Higgins).
    It’s such a shame that C@tmomma’s good point about Morrison doing weird shit was preceded by anti-Greens Labor slander, which is such a great point when you lot turn a blind eye to the millions of dollars of corporate fossil fuel donations, as well as supporting nuclear submarines and new coal and gas exploration, which will damage our environment more than one damn plane flight.


  35. Alexandra Smith writes that Matt Kean represents the youthful new face of the NSW government.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/nsw/arid-tram-lines-betray-the-youthful-new-face-of-nsw-government-20211110-p597p2.html

    Ms. Smith was shattered when her idol Gladys was discredited and disgraced. So she now finding another one to drool on. She cannot come to terms that LNP can be bad
    Either that or it is the effect of working for Costello 9Fax media

  36. Thanks paroti. As I suspected, but I do like nath’s faux summary even more.

    Sheridan’s rambling simply forget the ‘air-sea’ gap that surrounds Australia: that alone is worth 20 Israeli Defence Forces. Therefore he ignores that our force structure is nearly entirely built on that strategic positioning. The combination of the air-sea gap plus dozens of maritime strategic pinch points underpins the primacy that Defence planning has placed on having a regionally pier superior submarine capability as the cherry on top of the whole force structure. It underpins the decision to increase the fleet from 6 to 12 back in the 2009 Defence White Paper – and, giving the lie to LNP claims that Labor did nothing whilst in office – explains why that one of the very first decisions that Rudd made back in December 2007 was to initiate ‘Sea 1000’ – the planning process to replace the Collins Class submarine (which at that stage was still well within the first half of its expected service life). It explains why the Rudd government spent so much time and energy on the ‘programs of concern’ process to improve the performance and capability of existing defence platforms, especially the Collins – which labor found as a wreck of a program in 2007 and left it as a world leading capability in 2013.

    Our force structure for the army has also been rationalised to being capable of providing brigade to small division sized expeditionary capability at all times (and in that regard we can actually thank John Howard). This is a good video that explains the purpose and effectiveness of that capability:

    https://youtu.be/_onINY4rq74

    How that all fits together into the overall army force structure can be seen in the second half of this video:

    https://youtu.be/xH_CyDOHnps

    Our airforce is at the bleeding edge of advanced capability. The much maligned F35 is excellent, especially in its ability to fuse together all the other RAAF assets (F18F&Gs, AWACS, Poseidons, 3 seperate auto outs drone platforms, satellites: the lot) to achieve Air Supremacy over a very large area of operations.

    Sheridan is oblivious to all of that apparently. Probably because he has a murder boner for ‘strike’ weapons, by which I think he means long range nucs.

    That is not to say there are not gaps on the table in the overall force structure frame work (especially now given this stupid AUKUS pivot to inappropriate submarine platforms on the never never), but thanks to the 2009 Defence White paper the basic architecture that we need to ‘defend Australia’ and its strategic and diplomatic interests abroad (commensurate to our size and position in the world) is all there.

  37. “ Common cause makes for strange bedfellows, conveniently with unseemly haste.”

    Oh come on C@t: nath’s faux summary of Sheridan’s article was perfection! Be a bigger person 🙂

  38. Ryan Spencer @ #91 Thursday, November 11th, 2021 – 9:58 am

    Gnocchi, barbers and electric vehicles? Seems like someone is worried about losing the blue-ribbon Liberal seats to the Greens (Kooyong, Ryan, Brisbane, Higgins).
    It’s such a shame that C@tmomma’s good point about Morrison doing weird shit was preceded by anti-Greens Labor slander, which is such a great point when you lot turn a blind eye to the millions of dollars of corporate fossil fuel donations, as well as supporting nuclear submarines and new coal and gas exploration, which will damage our environment more than one damn plane flight.

    Honestly, I’m fine with The Greens winning seats off the Liberals if Labor can’t. I guess that’s just my (and yours via your comment about me), inherent bias towards my party showing through. Though that will never stop me commenting on whether The Greens walk the walk they talk. Especially wrt my light-hearted comment about SHY that you seem to have taken offence at. 🙂

    And as far as fossil fuel donations goes, this is still a free country where individuals and businesses can decide wherever they want to place their money. If they donate to Labor then they do so in the full knowledge that Labor will implement policies that may not always be in their best interests.

  39. @StuartEdser
    ·
    You know, I’ve just realised that, in the same way Malcolm Turnbull claimed marriage equality for himself and the Liberal Party, Morrison is going to position himself and the Liberals as the climate action party.

    If he only JUST realised it, he hasn’t been paying attention.

    In essence Morrison steals the fruit of other people’s efforts and claims the credit for himself. I’ve been banging on about “The Climate Epiphany” for years here.

    Rob Harris echoes another point I’ve been making when he suggests that Morrison will “use scare tactics”. Note the passive voice a senior member of the commentariat employs to describe a process in which he and his gang of fellow hacks must be willing participants, or else the tactic simply cannot work. What Harris is really saying is, “Morrison will use scare tactics and I’ll be helping him.”

    A few more “I don’t think, I know” style stories from our Senior media whores would let Morrison know that his barnstorming bullshit wouldn’t work this time. But don’t hold your breath. For every time a politician gives an actual honest answer to the “Do you think he lied?” form of journalistic by-the-numbers interrogatory, there are 999 “You’d have to ask him that” replies. Macron chose to be the one-in-a-thousand honest man, and gave three shocked reporters their likely Walkley. You could have knocked Bevan Shields, Andrew Probyn and Pablo Vinales over with a feather. This was official, from the horse’s mouth, not a flunky in sight. They had to report it. Tough gig, guys.

    The process Rob Harris was writing about today, on the other hand, was the one where journos on-the-drip pretend that oafs like Morrison are both “brilliant” and “serious” when telling the most outrageous lies. They know the One-In-A-Thousand Rule is well understood by Morrison, who will never give an honest answer to any question.

    They write about how he lies, but they willingly play the game anyway, pretending they aren’t an essential element in the whole rotten swindle. In their out-of-body experience they can float above themselves, telling their reading public of how the con works, like shell game shills on a street corner, challenging the mugs to try outwitting the scammer, while at the same time faking it as honest reporters just doing the job only they have the “training” to do. In the end the object of politics is The Game, not how it’s played.

    The election, according to Harris and the rest of his motley ilk, Nikki Savva (don’t cheer her: she’s just sore her man Turnbull got out-bullshitted by an even better exponent of the art) included, is not about truth or honesty. It’s about who’s the biggest liar. Lies are far more interesting than those other things. Lies give you so much scope, far more than those pesky facts.

    And they wonder why their newspapers are going broke.

  40. Victoria has recorded 1,313 new local COVID-19 cases and four deaths, as the government’s proposed pandemic laws continue to come under fire from the state’s opposition.

    There are now 15,675 active cases of the virus in Victoria, and 394 people have died during the current Delta outbreak.

    The new cases were detected from 67,105 test results received yesterday.

    There were 457 people in hospital, of whom 79 were in intensive care with 48 on a ventilator.

    There were 10,358 doses of vaccine given at state-run centres yesterday, as well as more vaccinations at GP clinics and other venues.

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-11-11/victoria-records-new-covid-cases-and-deaths/100611462

  41. Andrew_Earlwood @ #94 Thursday, November 11th, 2021 – 10:09 am

    “ Common cause makes for strange bedfellows, conveniently with unseemly haste.”

    Oh come on C@t: nath’s faux summary of Sheridan’s article was perfection! Be a bigger person 🙂

    I was talking about people suddenly loving Greg Sheridan’s work! 😆

    But, yes, Lurker nath is good for a laugh or two. 🙂

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