Not the WA election thread

New draft boundaries for Victoria and WA to be unveiled next Friday, plus other matters from the federal sphere.

To keep a general discussion post somewhere near the top of the page, I offer the following:

Paul Osborne of AAP reports the Australian Electoral Commission has confirmed that the draft federal redistributions for Victoria and Western Australia will be published next Friday. The latter has been the subject of particular media attention over the past week, owing to the potential for Christian Porter’s seat of Pearce to be abolished.

• John Anderson, who served in the House of Representatives from 1989 to 2007 and as Nationals leader and Deputy Prime Minister from 1999 to 2005, has announced he will seek preselection for the Nationals-designated number two position on the New South Wales Senate ticket. The position is available as a hangover from the Section 44 debacle, which caused the party to lose a seat to the Liberals in the recount that followed Fiona Nash’s disqualification. It was reported last month that state Nationals leader John Barilaro might also seek the position, though this would seem to be rather optimistic of him.

Kevin Bonham offers a long-range big-picture account of historical opinion polling, which concludes it would be highly unusual for a federal opposition polling only as well as Labor is right now to actually win an election.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,462 comments on “Not the WA election thread”

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  1. Ottens, who died on Saturday, had little patience with the renewed popularity of the cassette tape – or even vinyl.

    “Nothing can match the sound of the CD,” he had told the Dutch newspaper NRC Handelsblad. “It is absolutely noise and rumble-free. That never worked with tape … I have made a lot of record players and I know that the distortion with vinyl is much higher. I think people mainly hear what they want to hear.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/mar/11/lou-ottens-inventor-of-the-cassette-tape-dies-aged-94

    The last sentence could apply to so much more than that.

  2. Did you know a cassette tape revival was under way? A bit like some Millennials decided that they would never let the vinyl record die.

    Ugh. There’s a reason why we let the cassette tape die… Vinyl I can somewhat understand.

  3. Good morning Dawn Patrollers

    Waleed Aly argues that there will be no justice for anyone without an inquiry. Well worth a read.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/there-will-be-no-justice-for-anyone-without-an-inquiry-20210311-p579nl.html
    David Crowe wonders whether Labor could risk a “mutually assured destruction” by moving in parliament for an inquiry into the Porter allegation.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/porter-v-shorten-will-labor-risk-mutually-assured-destruction-20210311-p579wv.html
    “It is not too late, prime minister, to seek the advice of the solicitor general”, says former Solicitor-General, Justin Gleeson.
    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/mar/11/it-is-not-too-late-prime-minister-to-seek-the-advice-of-the-solicitor-general
    Michelle Grattan tells us how Morrison is grappling with slow vaccine rollout, end of JobKeeper and ministerial crises.
    https://theconversation.com/grattan-on-friday-morrison-grapples-with-slow-vaccine-rollout-end-of-jobkeeper-and-ministerial-crises-156975
    Tom Rabe and Matt O’Sullivan reveal that the NSW government’s justification for building a rail line to Sydney’s second airport has been savaged by the country’s peak infrastructure body, which warns the cost of the $11 billion project will far outweigh its benefit. The gold standards keep being presented!
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/cost-far-outweighs-benefit-sydney-s-11b-airport-rail-link-slammed-20210311-p579yh.html
    The Morrison government is preparing to expand its list of cut-price air fare destinations amid criticism its new support package has largely ignored Sydney and Melbourne.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/nsw/petulant-nsw-minister-says-queensland-should-not-be-rewarded-with-tourism-funding-20210311-p579tn.html
    The SMH editorial complains that there is no logic or justice in excluding NSW airports from the airfare subsidies.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/nsw/nsw-tourism-deserves-same-federal-support-as-queensland-20210311-p579xd.html
    The ACT is disappointed, too.
    https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/7162652/disappointed-canberra-tourism-sector-reacts-to-half-price-flights-taking-tourists-out-of-the-city/?cs=14225
    Michael Pascoe tells us how Morrison’s half-arsed, half-price airfares stunt has taken off. This is quite a good spit!
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/2021/03/12/michael-pascoe-half-arsed-airfares-stunt/
    The tacit message in the great air ticket cash splash is that state premiers will now close borders at their own peril, says Phil Coorey.
    https://www.afr.com/politics/federal/border-bribes-closed-one-day-hands-out-the-next-20210311-p579o7
    Jewell Topsfield expands on how thousands of people will protest against the discrimination of women and alleged sexual abuse in the nation’s Parliament in 40 marches planned across Australia.
    https://www.theage.com.au/national/it-was-a-visceral-anger-the-tweet-that-spawned-nationwide-protests-20210311-p579uk.html
    Ex-sex discrimination commissioner Elizabeth Broderick says workplace dynamics have changed and people should no longer expect sexual harassment will stay secret, writes Katina Curtis.
    https://www.theage.com.au/politics/federal/workplaces-have-changed-expert-says-if-you-don-t-get-that-you-don-t-belong-in-one-20210311-p579u9.html
    Rachel Clun reports that COVID-19 vaccine supply problems may push national rollout into 2022.
    https://www.theage.com.au/politics/federal/not-all-second-covid-19-shots-will-be-delivered-by-october-20210311-p579tv.html
    A 3.1 million dose shortfall in vaccine supplies and a revolt from doctors over inoculation payments threatens to push the completion of the nation’s COVID-19 immunisation program into the early part of next year, advises The Australian.
    https://www.theaustralian.com.au/nation/coronavirus-dose-of-reality-on-vaccination-target/news-story/c60d09baf7135ce76f8343f1501e213d
    The New Daily reports that Australia’s health boss, Brendan Murphy, has come under fire for the “dangerous” suggestion one coronavirus jab offers full protection as the national rollout falls behind schedule.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/coronavirus/2021/03/12/coronavirus-vaccine-rollout-australia/
    As we hopefully come out of the COVID-19 crisis, we need to make sure that the measures put in place do not become permanent nor have a permanent effect on our system of liberties, writes Michael Cope.
    https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/covid-19-vaccination-should-not-encroach-on-civil-liberties,14884
    A cynical Elizabeth Knight writes, “The government has given a facelift to its largely unused small to medium-sized business loan package. The first two iterations of this low interest rate assistance package were greeted by the targeted recipients with about as much enthusiasm as an offer for an enema.”
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/banking-and-finance/the-government-s-stimulus-gift-almost-no-one-wants-20210311-p579wd.html
    A growing body of evidence supports the proposition that creating ‘quality’ jobs delivers better outcomes for workers, employers and the economy. This contribution from Professor Angela Knox makes eminent sense!
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/workplace/quality-jobs-deliver-more-employment-and-a-better-economy-20210310-p579dl.html
    Australia’s economy would get massive boost from lift to super guarantee as Malcolm Turnbull joins the campaign to ensure it rises to 12% by 2025.
    https://www.theage.com.au/business/the-economy/12-billion-boost-turnbull-joins-super-fight-20210311-p579sb.html
    Anthony Galloway and Rob Harris tell us that Australia will launch an ambitious global plan to eliminate tariffs on wind turbines, solar panels and other green industries in a bid to fight back against the European Union’s (EU) push to impose carbon levies on countries with weak emissions laws.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/liberalisation-not-protectionist-australia-to-fight-eu-s-carbon-tariffs-with-its-own-plan-20210311-p579v9.html
    Mike Foley and Nick Toscano write that the future of NSW’s coal-fired power plants is under increasing threat from cheap renewable energy, which this week forced Victoria’s Yallourn coal plant to bring forward its closure date as analysts warn the end may come even sooner.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/coal-plant-closures-loom-large-as-nsw-backs-hydrogen-for-the-hunter-20210311-p579t7.html
    The botched transition to cleaner power is a political failure, not a market failure, declares the AFR’s editorial.
    https://www.afr.com/policy/economy/as-coal-exits-what-will-take-its-place-20210310-p579jq
    And Angela Macdonald-Smith reports that fossil-fuel and renewable energy bosses are saying they can’t justify investing in the gas power and firming generation needed to help offset the plant’s closure.
    https://www.afr.com/companies/energy/power-industry-trapped-in-catch-22-as-yallourn-closes-20210311-p579q8
    The death of coal-fired power is inevitable — yet the government still has no plan to help its workforce, writes Chris Briggs.
    https://theconversation.com/the-death-of-coal-fired-power-is-inevitable-yet-the-government-still-has-no-plan-to-help-its-workforce-156863
    And Richard Holden argues that the timing of Yallourn’s closure shows it’s high time for a carbon price.
    https://theconversation.com/vital-signs-timing-of-yallourns-closure-shows-its-high-time-for-a-carbon-price-156936
    Outcry at Australia’s coal plant closures misses the point – change is coming, explains Adam Morton.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/mar/12/outcry-at-australias-coal-plant-closures-misses-the-point-change-is-coming
    Cait Kelly reports that the Australian government is refusing to address claims that some of the Liberal Party’s biggest fossil fuel donors have profited from fast-tracked, multibillion-dollar projects.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/2021/03/12/gas-donors-government/
    Lawyer Fiona Thatcher writes, “Lo and behold, it’s a woman shown the door in the aftermath of Porter”.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/lo-and-behold-it-s-a-woman-shown-the-door-in-the-aftermath-of-porter-20210311-p579p1.html
    This s simply awful! The Age reports on yesterday’s explanation in court in the case against the truck driver who ran into and killed three police officers last year.
    https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/concerns-raised-about-truckie-s-drug-use-fatigue-in-days-before-crash-court-told-20210310-p579jj.html
    China’s markets have plummeted, but its authorities appear keen not to let its citizens know about it, writes Stephen Bartholomeusz.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/markets/china-might-be-keeping-its-citizens-in-the-dark-about-markets-plunging-20210311-p579r5.html

    Cartoon Corner

    Peter Broelman


    David Rowe

    Mark David

    Glen Le Lievre rolls out the penises again


    Andrew Dyson


    John Shakespeare

    Matt Golding



    Cathy Wilcox

    Johannes Leak

    From the US












  4. Lars Von Trier:

    Friday, March 12, 2021 at 7:00 am

    [‘mavis, Do you see evidence of the criminal mindset on pb ? Or is it just garden variety crazy ?’]

    Possibly. Crims normally use a lot of expletives. Their is a contributor to this site who does similarly. But to be sure I’d need to check his tatts and shake his hand, some crims having a certain style of tatt and an unusual handshake, something like a Mason’s… To avoid unfairly exposing him, I think he should out himself.

  5. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2021/mar/12/no-prime-minister-sexual-assault-allegations-are-not-only-a-matter-for-the-police

    This is a very good article addressing remedies and inquiries which are available.

    Some are real. I acted for a woman, who when 16, was impregnated by the school PE teacher. It was evident that the school, a public school south of Sydney, suspected what was going on. It made her leave close to the birth of her daughter and the teacher stayed on for another 30+ years.

    He retired with interest in two properties. Now he has none.

  6. Mavis @ #4 Friday, March 12th, 2021 – 4:48 am

    Possibly. Crims normally use a lot of expletives. Their is a contributor to this site who does similarly. But to be sure I’d need to check his tatts and shake his hand, some crims having a certain style of tatt and an unusual handshake, something like a Mason’s… To avoid unfairly exposing him, I think he should out himself.

    William Bowe?!?!?!?!?!

    (posted with tongue in cheek of course).

  7. A long article ………….

    ‘We’re going to lose fast’: U.S. Air Force held a war game that started with a Chinese biological attack

    Last fall, the U.S. Air Force simulated a conflict set more than a decade in the future that began with a Chinese biological-weapon attack that swept through U.S. bases and warships in the Indo-Pacific region. Then a major Chinese military exercise was used as cover for the deployment of a massive invasion force. The simulation culminated with Chinese missile strikes raining down on U.S. bases and warships in the region, and a lightning air and amphibious assault on the island of Taiwan.

    The highly classified war game, which has not been previously made public, took place less than a year after the coronavirus, reportedly originating in a Chinese market,spread to the crew of the USS Theodore Roosevelt aircraft carrier, taking one of the U.S. Navy’s most significant assets out of commission.

    MORE : https://www.aol.com/were-going-lose-fast-u-170003228.html

  8. For all the squealing by duopoly partisans about critiques of them being sold out to corporate and vested interests.
    As Michael asks rhetorically are there any actual humans who are members of both the Lib and Lab parties?

    But what about non-humans being members of both parties?

    Are corporations really members of both the Lib and Lab parties, with gold and silver level membership ($$$) with sundry special access and drinkies?

    No wonder there appears so much reluctance to talk on PB about many of the stories Michael West and co have been breaking about the corrupting influence of donations and lobbyists in the Lib/Lab duopoly #auspol.

    It’s almost certainly just as significant as to what is not discussed on PB as to what is, when it comes to corruption and vested interests in auspol.

    Certainly seems that $ buys these companies better guaranteed access to party leaders or MP’s and policy discussions than any regular human member of these duopoly parties gets.

    State Capture – The corporations who are members of both the Liberal & Labor parties!
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RG30fkypFtk&ab_channel=TheWestReport

  9. https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/mar/11/denmark-pauses-astrazeneca-vaccines-to-investigate-blood-clot-reports

    Firstly, I am not a medical professional and I’m not a anti-vaxer,secondly I have a flu shot every year but this makes me wary of the vaccine we will get. Thirdly , how is the general public supposed to decide the efficacy of something ( myself included ) like a vaccine with limited knowledge and when there are varying stories and information. ?
    I don’t trust the federal govt to be honest about this.

  10. What the article leaves out, and this is common in what has been a circling exercise:

    (a) is the question of power which Gleeson SC has alluded to twice now;

    (b) is the utility of an investigation addressing events of 33 years ago involving children (that is palpably unprecedented) when:

    (i) the intention of the now deceased complainant in relation to the complaint can at best be inferred;
    (ii) there is no corroboration beyond the sharing of the complaint;
    (iii) there appears to be complex medical issues;
    (iv) the process is intrusive and just may leave an unsatisfactory trail of enhanced despair;
    (v) the AG is emphatic in his denials and the scope for cross-examining him, from an ethical point of view, may be limited to putting what Kate says happened (three separate criminal acts, maybe more) and hearing what he says ie there is no corroborative facts permitting a vigorous cross-examination; and

    (c) can this properly be characterised as a fitness hearing when the crime is proven or not and what does that mean in terms of the framing of the questions for determination by the inquiry, level of proof, onus and reasoning?

  11. Victoria says: Friday, March 12, 2021 at 8:22 am

    Meanwhile the net is closing in on Trump and his cronies.

    **********************************************

    Trump is in trouble — and even his few remaining ‘enabler’ lawyers are facing sanctions: legal experts

    Investigators are ramping up criminal probes into former President Donald Trump, and two legal experts argue that Trump may not even be able to count on his few remaining lawyers to help him.

    Writing in the Washington Post, legal experts Donald Ayer and Norm Eisen argue that Trump’s decades-long evasion of legal accountability may now finally be coming to an end thanks to the multiple investigations he’s facing.

    Although Trump in the past has employed top-notch lawyers to get him out of trouble, they write that the president’s remaining “legal enablers” may have difficulty staying with him given their own mounting troubles.

    Trump’s indictment and conviction are far from assured, although at this point prosecutors seem to be barreling toward slapping him with criminal charges.

    “This is not to say that exacting justice will be easy — as a private businessman, Trump was notorious for using the law as a weapon,” they write. “But the walls seem to be rapidly closing in. If they do, they may finally mark an end to the ex-president’s involvement in our public life. It is not easy to be involved in politics if you are broke and in jail.”

    https://www.rawstory.com/trump-legal-troubles/

  12. When is the government going to stop hiding behind coronavirus announcements? That stuff should be left to health officials, it is too important to be used as a political football.

  13. Quoll
    The money used by the ‘business community’ to buy policy is why I call bullshit on this from the AFR. The ‘politics’ was a direct result of efforts from members of the ‘market’. Bought and paid for by them they got what they paid for.

    The botched transition to cleaner power is a political failure, not a market failure, declares the AFR’s editorial.

  14. Morning all. Thanks BK. So great news that Yallourn is definitely closing, and it exposes those who don’t really want a solution to climate change when they complain about it. Its closing by 2028 at the latest. More will follow. This still won’t solve the problem of inaction over GHG emissions from other sectors of our economy, so the EU will still be entitled to tariff us under the Paris convention, and probably will. We have not exactly put on a charm offensive with them in recent years.

    As this Guardian article highlights, the real economic close down date for Yallourn is probably sooner, perhaps 2025. I suggest there is an obvious “last job” to fund work in the coal power industry, for which the power station workers would be ideally placed. Clean up. That is, fund the shutdown, demolition and remediation of the sites. There are too many examples to demonstrate that power plants filled with pollutants are rarely cleaned up when they close. They linger as polluted eyesores. The owners should pay to remediate. Make them employ the workers, plus specialists in pollution monitoring. Remediation of these sites can easily be a two year task for a sizeable skilled team. If places like Yallourn really should close in 2025, accept it, and fund a clean up from 2026 to 2028. This will also make places like theLa Trobe Valley much more appealing to host new industries and residents afterwards. That, and keep building wind, solar, interconnectors and big batteries. Job done.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/mar/12/outcry-at-australias-coal-plant-closures-misses-the-point-change-is-coming

  15. Danama Papers:

    Friday, March 12, 2021 at 8:26 am

    [‘William Bowe?!?!?!?!?!’]

    In be fair, WB normally only swears when exasperated whereas the dear poster I have in mind swears as a matter of routine, to give oomph to his posts.

  16. If Trump still has a passport, might he consider a sojourn in a suitable country before the law and his creditors really start applying the screws?

  17. Shellbell

    Regarding Porter, is there an argument that he is conflicted in carrying out his duties as AG while the allegations are unresolved? How does he impartially make policy or regulations on sexual assault cases when he has a relevant allegation of assault of his own? This is not to deny his presumption of innocence, but even innocent people facing such allegations would prefer the system made the trying of such allegations as difficult as possible.

  18. sonar

    There was a story a day or two ago about a number of sailors who received the vaccine ending up in hospital. Nothing since? I’d like to know more details about this. And like you, I don’t trust this government.

  19. The subsidised flights hit regions not selected both ways, as people who would have travelled to these areas are being paid to go elsewhere. Many regions would have been better off if the subsidies were not introduced.

  20. Socrates

    The only conflict, and it is a big ‘un, is the failure to refer the matter to the SG for advice. Otherwise he is well away from a situation where the choices he make is influenced by the position he is in.

    I wonder if the SG’s independence is such that he can he give an opinion without being requested to do so. Maybe the SG thinks his position is untenable because of the absence of any referral.

  21. [‘Health authorities in Denmark, Norway and Iceland say they have temporarily suspended the use of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine after reports of the formation of blood clots in some who have been vaccinated.’]

    Reports of medical incidents of the Astra vaccine are increasing. But Morrison, his mother, and mother-in-law need not be concerned as they got the Pfizer jab.

  22. AstraZeneca
    Professor Murphy said one dose of the vaccine provided
    full protection but needed to be topped off.
    Murphy denied he was providing political cover.

    Full cover or not?

  23. zoomster @ #NaN Friday, March 12th, 2021 – 8:52 am

    The subsidised flights hit regions not selected both ways, as people who would have travelled to these areas are being paid to go elsewhere. Many regions would have been better off if the subsidies were not introduced.

    Yes, I always thought that the Coalition were the defenders of, ‘let the market rip!’

  24. When its your turn to be vaccinated be aware of these side effects reported from UK, better vaccinated than dead but there are side effects

  25. Thanks BK. Love today’s Rowe, he’s easily the very best of our cartoonists in my view.

    John Anderson wanting to make a comeback isn’t surprising given the Nationals have lost their sense of identity as a party. You can Nats MPs from previous generations thinking they can solve that problem, when the real problem is one of demography and the emergence of these nuisance micro parties.

  26. I think David Crowe puts it best as he places his rationalisation for why an Inquiry into the Porter allegations would be a good thing:

    Could a retired judge really overcome this basic problem? He or she could hear from others, such as the woman’s friends, but the ability to listen to hearsay is not a compelling case for a judicial inquiry. So the very fact used by some to call for a review – the tragic death of the woman involved – can also be used to reject one.

    This does not mean Porter can walk on.

    Shorten was interviewed at least once by Victoria Police and waived privilege against self-incrimination. He answered follow-up questions from police. He handed documents to police in response to requests. The investigation lasted 10 months.

    Porter was never interviewed by NSW Police. The reason is simple: he was not asked. The force said last week that it did not want to put claims to a suspect before having a formal statement from the woman.

    This is a better argument for an inquiry than some of the others. Porter has taken questions from the media in a torrid press conference but not from authorities who have all the claims before them – not least the woman’s written account of her experience.

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/porter-v-shorten-will-labor-risk-mutually-assured-destruction-20210311-p579wv.html

  27. The Prince of Panache together with his swagger of self-righteous bravado, camouflaging a dangerous naievity while trying to out run the evitable cyclonic path of ill-conceived announcements and it’s mayhem has ticked another box .
    Australia, for all to hear, has backed the wrong horse in the race to inoculate the population from the devastation of Covid.
    The good news from a marketing point of view is that rich Australians will benefit from government subsidised holidays while waiting to contact Covid.
    The electorate remains inured to dark cloud overhead, maintaining the belief in the absolutely scientific phenomena that Australia always wins gold and the PM they elected wouldn’t be a complete dill.
    There remains time for a reconfiguration of Australia moving forward.
    The polls need to turn rapidly otherwise we’ll all be cooking with Angus’ gas for years to come

  28. SportsRorts and FlightRorts started out with the same objective – direct taxpayers’ money to selected electorates to try and gain an electoral advantage.

    The big difference is that it took some time for the manipulation in SportsRorts to be exposed, while the manipulation in FlightRorts has been exposed immediately.

    At least Morrison got to sit in the pilot’s seat yesterday. “Fly me to Hawaii” he was obviously thinking.

  29. When did Sick Hunt getting his shot?

    “Mr Hunt was diagnosed with cellulitis on Wednesday, a day after being admitted to hospital with a suspected infection. In a statement, his office …”

  30. Even if Trump is indicted on multiple offences, the problem prosecutors will face is to find a jury that does not have at least one of his supporters on it or one who may succumb to a Trump bribe. I recall Bjelke-Peterson’s ’91 trial for perjury where he escaped conviction as there was a National Party supporter on the jury and a woman sympathetic to Joe, both of whom claimed he was innocent. The rest is history. Incidentally Her Majesty was represented by Nick Cowdery QC, of the Sydney Bar, later the NSW DPP, and Calinan’s (future HC judge) junior in the prosecution of Lionel Murphy.

  31. A few things to keep in mind when looking at vaccine reaction stats:

    Association is not causation.

    The numbers are meaningless in the absence of total vaccine events recorded and without comparative data on the expected frequency of the adverse events in the absence of the vaccination. X instances of cellulitis or thromboembolism per million is very different to X events per thousand and needs to be compared with the number of events that would normally be expected. As has been pointed out, good pre-existing public health data and statistics are a big help in clarifying these things.


  32. sonar says:
    Friday, March 12, 2021 at 8:34 am

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/mar/11/denmark-pauses-astrazeneca-vaccines-to-investigate-blood-clot-reports

    Firstly, I am not a medical professional and I’m not a anti-vaxer,secondly I have a flu shot every year but this makes me wary of the vaccine we will get. Thirdly , how is the general public supposed to decide the efficacy of something ( myself included ) like a vaccine with limited knowledge and when there are varying stories and information. ?
    I don’t trust the federal govt to be honest about this.

    30 in 5 million have had blood clots, but alive (and not even 100% sure of the cause)
    We have our economy on meds to stop the spread.
    In the USA it is about 125,000 per 5 million who have died.

    It is the stupidity test for you (love that cartoon).

  33. https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/world/more-nations-suspend-use-of-astrazeneca-vaccine/ar-BB1euIyF?ocid=winp1taskbar

    Denmark, Iceland and Norway have suspended the use of the Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine while the European Union’s medicines regulator investigates whether the shot could be linked to a number of reports of blood clots.

    Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton has insisted the vaccine is safe for use in Australia.

    Denmark announced a two-week suspension on following a number of reports of clotting in the country, including one fatal case. Iceland and Norway followed suit, but did not say how long their suspensions would last.

    Mr Dutton says Australia’s rollout of the injections will continue unless new evidence suggests the drug is not safe.

    “We have the best doctors in the world. They have gone through all the tests and trials. We’ve not rushed it. We will look at all the evidence,” Mr Dutton told Today.

    “If there’s a problem the government responds very quickly. At the moment the advice very clearly from the doctors is that this is a safe vaccine and we want the rollout to continue. Cool heads need to prevail.”

    There we are folks – if its good enough for Mr. Dutton – it should be good enough for ………

    Is coffee an antidote for stupidity ❓ ☕

  34. Cheers, Warrigal.

    Though I think we should be given poetic license to continue to speculate about the Sick Hunt. 😀

  35. Warrigal
    Yep.The elderly and frail have been targeted for early vaccines and so the odds of them reporting some ailment over a period of a few days , with or without receiving the vaccine, would be fairly high.


  36. poroti says:
    Friday, March 12, 2021 at 8:39 am

    Quoll
    The money used by the ‘business community’ to buy policy is why I call bullshit on this from the AFR. The ‘politics’ was a direct result of efforts from members of the ‘market’. Bought and paid for by them they got what they paid for.

    The botched transition to cleaner power is a political failure, not a market failure, declares the AFR’s editorial.

    Has the transition been botched?

    I would say it is going reasonable well even though politically the Liberals and the Greens have been trying to mess it up. We as a country are lucky the electricity market foundation is state not federally based.

  37. Wow, if per chance the Health Minister contracted cellulitis from a jab such will cause widespread public concern. I’m sure the spin doctors are onto this. And in other news, Dr. Dutton’s on the job, saying that he doesn’t believe the reports of blood clots (Denmark, Norway, and Iceland) being associated with the AstraZeneca vaccine have any relevance in Oz.

  38. Denmark announced a two-week suspension on following a number of reports of clotting in the country, including one fatal case.

    Jeez, how pissed off would you be that you had made it through the eye of the pandemic storm, only to fall at the vaccine hurdle? 😯

    And, Australia’s Mr Potato Head, sure isn’t wrong about this:

    We’ve not rushed it… Mr Dutton told Today.

  39. Mavis

    [‘Health authorities in Denmark, Norway and Iceland say they have temporarily suspended the use of AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine after reports of the formation of blood clots in some who have been vaccinated.’]

    Reports of medical incidents of the Astra vaccine are increasing. But Morrison, his mother, and mother-in-law need not be concerned as they got the Pfizer jab.

    Now I am worried about the AstraZeneca vaccine, for myself and the female members of my family. We have some sort of hereditary blood clotting disorder which has resulted in several cases of pulmonary emboli (my mother and her sister), premature births, and pregnancy related clotting complications.

    My mother has had pulmonary emboli twice. Even though she is 86, she seems likely to get the AstraZeneca vaccine, as she is not in a nursing home. Luckily (?) there is no sign of her getting it any time soon, but I wonder if it will be actually safe for her.

    I guess I need to get on to PubMed

  40. Frednk
    Whatever the description it has seen a mountain of our time , money and energy wasted by those fighting the inevitable. Yes indeed re the States v Feds , lucky for all the States have such a large say , just like Covid.

  41. Hah! I was going to post yesterday that something along these lines was likely, but I thought I would be shouted down by the PB hive mind. However, it seems I am not the only one who thinks so, so today I will:

    https://www.afr.com/companies/energy/power-industry-trapped-in-catch-22-as-yallourn-closes-20210311-p579q8

    Fossil fuel power and renewables chief executives say they are unable to justify investing in the gas power and firming generation needed to help offset the closure of the Yallourn plant in Victoria in 2028 unless electricity market rules are changed, such as by paying them to provide back-up power.

    Federal government-owned Snowy Hydro chief executive Paul Broad …“You’re going to need more gas plants in Victoria to keep the lights on,” he said. “Batteries are all well and good. But there’s a massive opportunity for gas power, the market is screaming out for it in Victoria, and even more so now.”

    Perhaps our resident experts here could advise on whether a specific market for such a “back up power” service already exists in any form (the article makes it sound like it doesn’t), or on the feasibility of one being defined. Essentially, paying providers to just have spare generation capacity available even when it may never be needed. Such a market would not be restricted to fossil fuel generators – large hydro, sufficiently widely distributed renewables or multiple big batteries could also potentially compete in such a market at times. But the cost of building them specifically for this purpose (remember this is supposed to be back up capacity) would seem to make it unlikely.

    But one thing is certain – anyone who thinks our electricity providers are going to miss any trick to keep our electricity market being hugely profitable for them, and our retail electricity prices amongst the highest in the world, is being a tad naive.

    EDIT: add link

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