Essential Research leadership ratings, ACT poll, Eden-Monaro wash-up

Poll respondents continue to rate incumbents generously in their response to COVID-19; an ACT poll points to a status quo result at the election there in October; and the preference distribution is finalised from the Eden-Monaro by-election.

The Guardian reports the latest fortnightly Essential Research poll includes its monthly leadership ratings, showing further improvement in Scott Morrison’s standing. He is up three points on approval to 66% and down four on disapproval to 23%, while Anthony Albanese is respectively steady at 44% and up two to 30%, and his lead as preferred prime minister is at 52-22, out from 50-27.

The small-sample breakdowns on state government performance finds the Victorian government still holding up reasonably well, with 49% rating it good (down four on a week ago, but well down on a 75% peak in mid-June), while the New South Wales government’s good rating is down a point to 61% and Queensland’s up a point to 68%. Results for the federal goverment are not provided, but will presumably be in the full report when it is published later today.

Fifty per cent now rate themselves very concerned about COVID-19, which is up seven points on a fortnight ago and has been progressively rising from a low of 25% in mid-June. Fifty-six per cent of respondents said they would seek a vaccine straight away, 35% less immediately and 8% not at all. Twenty per cent believed that “hydroxychloroquine has been shown to be a safe and effective treatment”.

UPDATE: Full report here. The federal government’s good rating on handling COVID-19 is down a point to 63%, and its poor rating is steady at 16%.

Other news:

• We had a rare opinion poll for the Australian Capital Territory, which holds its election on October 17, conducted by uComms for the Australia Institute. It offered no indication that the Liberals are about to break free of their status as a permanent opposition, with Labor on 37.6%, Liberal on 38.2% and the Greens on 14.6%, compared with 2016 election results of 38.4%, 36.7% and 10.3%. This would almost certainly result in a continuation of the present state of affairs in which the Greens hold the balance of the power. The poll also found overwhelming support for “truth in political advertising” laws, with 88.5% supportive and 4.9% opposed. The poll was conducted on July 20 from a sample of 1049.

• The preference distribution from the July 4 Eden-Monaro by-election has been published, offering some insight into how much Labor’s narrow victory was owed to a Shooters Fishers and Farmers preference recommendation and a higher than usual rate of leakage from the Nationals. The former was likely decisive: when Shooters were excluded at the final count, 5341 (56.61%) went to Labor and 4093 (43.39%) went to Liberal, which includes 5066 first preference Shooters votes and another 4368 they picked up during the preference distribution (including 1222 from the Nationals). When the Nationals were excluded earlier in the count, 4399 votes (63.76%) went to the Liberals, the aforementioned 1222 (17.71%) to Shooters, 995 (14.42%) to Labor and 283 (4.10%) to the Greens. This includes 6052 first preference votes for the Nationals and another 847 they picked up as preferences earlier in the distribution. That would be consistent with maybe 20% of Nationals votes ending up with Labor compared with 13% at the 2019 election, which would not quite account for Labor’s winning margin. At some point in the future, two-candidate preferred preference flow figures will tell us precisely how each candidate’s votes split between Labor and Liberal.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

2,756 comments on “Essential Research leadership ratings, ACT poll, Eden-Monaro wash-up”

Comments Page 51 of 56
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  1. Thanks Outside Left. I’d love to be a Blues Bro. Cool dudes.

    But I say thanks to those of you who post regularly to keep the sites going. It’s much appreciated.

  2. P1

    ‘Labor’s response to their shock loss has been to dump their existing policies…’

    Which they always do after an election loss. As I said to begin with, you’d expect the media to understand that, even if outsiders like yourself don’t.

    Beazley only kept opposition to the GST and the sell off of Telstra, for example. All other policies were dumped.

    Beazley, having kept the anti-GST policies, ended up looking foolish because the Libs addressed many of the issues he’d raised, so that by election time ‘Rollback’ was incoherent.

    As for the rest of your points, I’ve been anti-Albo from the start, so I’ll repeat: not defending, explaining.

  3. For anyone interested
    The changes that delinked staffing from funding occurred under Howard, the next major change was to funding. In 2008 a new assessment tool was introduced that significantly reduced funding available, this was also developed under Howard. It was designed to reduce the cost of aged care and was at the behest of the large not for profit organisations.

    Under the previous scheme to get good funding you had to do detailed assessment by Registered nurses, under the new model you got slightly more than previously without the need for a stringent assessment, it negatively affected the funding available to those homes doing a good job.

    The next tranche of changes, under Abbott was to further reduce funding by claiming providers were putting in fraudulent claims. In fact the claims were often accurate but you had to fight the bureaucracy and prove it. Big organisations were loathe to do this, the simpler the system especially if done by computer the better.

  4. zoomster @ #2499 Saturday, August 15th, 2020 – 3:11 pm

    You seem to be arguing the case for delayed policy announcements more than I am.

    Nope. Quite the opposite. Here is the important bit again:

    The policy development process should consult, develop and announce with minimum delays between these steps. And time needs to be allowed after the announcement for the policies to be examined, understood, and (if necessary) criticized and corrected. Leaving this to the last minute is asking for trouble.

    Labor used to believe in stuff like this. In fact, they used to pride themselves on it. As Labor has shifted to the right, so has the Labor policy development process – it has become more closed, introverted, elitist, secret and late. I guess this has to do with Labor gradually losing its core constituency. In doing so, it has also lost its roots.

  5. P1

    You seem to be confusing ‘late announcements of policies’ with ‘policy development’.

    Labor has always (rightly or wrongly) used the same time frame for policy development it is using now (so what they ‘used to believe’ is what they still believe).

    I began by pointing out that political journalists who don’t understand that are either too ignorant to be covering politics or are pretending they don’t know. Either way, that means their commentary should not be taken seriously.

  6. BH

    The Make it a Referendum on Trump election policy, in part requires motivating those who don’t like him for whatever amongst the numerous reasons to consider voting against him – to turn up and vote for Biden. Or if they voted for him last time, to stay at home, or use the write in provision at the top of the ticket.

    Reinforcing this meme through a nebulous Presidential Crimes Commission, pushed by a Congressional Committee Chair, is one way of recycling all the alleged crimes Dotard and his henchmen have done. There is no shortage of allegations.

    When Dotard explodes, Biden can come in statesmanlike.

    And be under no illusion, the Republicans are going to fight as dirty as can be imagined.

  7. Punters are really not tuned into politics right now. The next election is at least a year away. There’s no point whatsoever in trying to nourish a sense of grievance among the punters when most are feeling a kind of existential anxiety because of the pandemic. Labor have decided to wait. The Greenists will resent that. They thrive on grievance…on contumely and revenge. Too bad for them. They can find their patience or gnaw on their animosity.

    The LNP are in power. The Greenists might focus their resentments on those who have power rather than those who do not. But this will never do. At all times and all places, Greenist practice is to denounce Labor. The Greenist purpose here is to make sure that Labor never attain power. Their anti-Labor aggression is never far from the surface.

  8. Assantdj, thanks, good overview.

    Everyone,
    The word I’ve heard from a couple of people brought inside the Labor tent is that Butler is the timid one on emissions policy. Matches with his efforts last election too.

    Might surprise you who has been brought in for advice, too.

    That said, I’d ignore anything Bowen proposes. He’ll try to be too smart by half, again.


  9. zoomster says:
    Saturday, August 15, 2020 at 3:06 pm

    frednk

    The Greens seem to think it’s a virtue to keep the same policies basically forever. Times change and policies need to change with them.

    Greens need anti Labor policies, they are the left side of the Green/Liberal wedge. They can’t start policy development until Labor have done their policy development; all they have now are old wedges and chants of “release your policy, release your policy”. It really is a bit sad.

    Corona is completely reshaping the landscape. In 2020 the chant is almost a parody.

    Nice to see you and you insights back.

  10. zoomster @ #2502 Saturday, August 15th, 2020 – 3:15 pm

    Which they always do after an election loss. As I said to begin with, you’d expect the media to understand that, even if outsiders like yourself don’t.

    Beazley only kept opposition to the GST and the sell off of Telstra, for example. All other policies were dumped.

    Beazley, having kept the anti-GST policies, ended up looking foolish because the Libs addressed many of the issues he’d raised, so that by election time ‘Rollback’ was incoherent.

    As for the rest of your points, I’ve been anti-Albo from the start, so I’ll repeat: not defending, explaining.

    Labor reviews policies after each election loss, as it should. But that doesn’t mean they just dump them, as you yourself have pointed out. And it certainly shouldn’t mean Labor finds itself flailing about without a policy platform as the next election looms.

    And … to be brutally honest … aren’t you Labor “explainers” just getting a little tired of losing?

    To quote from the most recent election review:

    Labor has failed to win a majority in the House of Representatives in eight out of its last nine starts. What went wrong this time?

    By all means you keep believing that carrying on doing the same thing after each loss might lead you to a different outcome. I will await your next post-election review with avid interest. I predict that it will contain a line very similar to the following:

    Labor has failed to win a majority in the House of Representatives in nine out of its last ten starts. What went wrong this time?

  11. zoomster @ #2505 Saturday, August 15th, 2020 – 3:31 pm

    P1

    You seem to be confusing ‘late announcements of policies’ with ‘policy development’.

    Labor has always (rightly or wrongly) used the same time frame for policy development it is using now (so what they ‘used to believe’ is what they still believe).

    I began by pointing out that political journalists who don’t understand that are either too ignorant to be covering politics or are pretending they don’t know. Either way, that means their commentary should not be taken seriously.

    Sadly however, their commentary actually counts.

  12. Player One
    The most important thing seems to be finding anyone but themselves to blame for those losses. Who knows , one day the ‘party’ might ask themselves “maybe it’s me ? ” .

  13. P1

    I have minimal interest in Labor atm, as I thought I made clear. I’d rather they were in government than the Liberals, but that’s about it. However, I will explain how things work when I know, to aid readers here in their understanding.

    So, I restate: explaining, not defending.

  14. zoomster @ #2514 Saturday, August 15th, 2020 – 3:46 pm

    I have minimal interest in Labor atm, as I thought I made clear. I’d rather they were in government than the Liberals, but that’s about it. However, I will explain how things work when I know, to aid readers here in their understanding.

    So, I restate: explaining, not defending.

    Odd. My bullshit detector just went off scale.

  15. …ironically, I was virtually out the door, and then I put my name forward as a rep at Conference, in the confident assumption that I would lose, that would prove how thankless all my work had been, and I could flounce out with a clear conscience. Alas, I was elected with a very healthy vote, so I’m still involved (although, of course, not only has Conference been cancelled but everyone in Victoria Labor has been disendorsed….)

  16. Shellbell

    It would be a good thing if the Victorians litigate these confidentiality and immunity from giving evidence issues

    As Mr Walker noted in his rather expansive essay, it would be helpful for NSW to rewrite its “Special Commissions” Act along the lines of the Victorian equivalent, which implies* that the Victorian act has a better chance of getting at this issue (and indeed Mr Walker notes this explicitly – under the Victorian Act the issue can he asserts be dealt with in a timely manner, rather than [in my understanding] arriving at a situation involving a length dealy where the Commonwealth threatens High Court action and the Commission is unable to bring it on as an urgent matter)

    * In another part of the report, Mr Walker uses a derivative of “infer” where it expected to see a derivative “imply”. I was not completely convinced either way, due in part for Mr Walker his own cleverness and consequent tendency towards impenetrable prose. In software we have the following (attributed to Brian Kernighan):

    Everyone knows that debugging is twice as hard as writing a program in the first place. So if you’re as clever as you can be when you write it, how will you ever debug it?

    Perhaps Mr Walker (and others of his silky ilk) could consider this side effect of their clievness?

  17. Thinking of COVID…of course, it constitutes an historic change in the way most people live. It is a really quite extraordinary phenomenon. Considering the sense in which it is all about change…about the real experience and the reactions to it….it’s quite clear that one reason MacGowan is so popular is because he’s managed to minimise the changes for most of the community.

    This is really to say that MacGowan has succeeded by recognising the “conservative” instincts of so many. This has certainly wedged the Liberals, who are well-versed in exploiting opposition to change and in exploiting fear.

    So this is a double-edged sword for those who want reform. Clearly, there is a very receptive and numerous constituency among those who do not want changes; who want things to remain as little changed as possible. When these impulses are tied to defusing grave fears, the political forces are overwhelming. MacGowan is very likely to almost obliterate the Liberals in March. The Liberals are also threatened Federally by this as well. The Liberals have become exponents of dangerous changes…of reckless indifference to fear. This will probably hurt them very deeply.

    There are lessons for Federal Labor here too. In a context of very real, widespread and recurring fear, Labor can advantage itself by representing safety and re-assurance. This is not politics as usual, which generally require Oppositions to arouse antagonism and a wish for change. Change is really the last thing people want in a pandemic… in an environment where refuge and protection are front of mind.

  18. When he is not writing amazing poems, he is writing prose that hits the nail on the head.

    GazzaFromGrongGrong

    Scott Morrison must be getting very frustrated with Daniel Andrews. Because, despite all the negative hotel-quarantine publicity, particularly from the more hysterical Murdoch media hacks, Andrews still scored a 68% to 32% approval rating in a recent Herald Sun poll over his handling of the pandemic.

    In nautical terms, Andrews is rather like a war-weary battleship, fronting up each day and ploughing doggedly through the waves towards his destination. Morrison, on the other hand, is more a small yacht bobbing about on the surface, tossed this way and that by the prevailing wind.

    There are two iconic Morrison photographs. One is the shot of him with his arm across Malcolm Turnbull’s shoulder just prior to the coup, and I can’t help thinking of the Judas kiss in the Garden of Gethsemane. The other is the arranged arm-waving photo-op in the church as the PM displayed fealty to his god. And I’m reminded of Matthew 6:5 in the World English Bible version. “When you pray, you shall not be as the hypocrites, for they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and in the corners of the streets, that they may be seen by men.”

    In Katharine’s analysis of the detail in yesterday’s apology, there seems to be a hollowness at Morrison’s centre, a sense that every time he fronts a microphone in situations like this the wind has changed direction and is pushing him somewhere he doesn’t really want to go. He is the eternal marketing man, the chancer, revelling in selling the good news, but struggling with the bad, having to be prodded into action by some external force.

    We saw it with the bushfires and the ill-timed trip to Hawaii. We saw it with his initial response to the pandemic, where it was the state premiers who led the way. And we’re seeing it again as he finally fronts up to apologise.

    Yes, Andrews and Morrison are deploying different approaches and the “passive aggressive chest bumping” is something we don’t need in a crisis, but I’d rather be on a battleship than a yacht if caught in a storm.

    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/aug/15/scott-morrisons-coronavirus-mea-culpa-was-barely-disguised-score-settling-with-daniel-andrews

  19. Player One

    You seems to believe that you are the only one who can see “the truth” and everyone else is bullshitting. It’s a bit annoying.

  20. Now the rumour is that the NSW Deputy Premier is getting involved in the Vic/NSW border issues.

    It’s an absolute mess. Service NSW interprets the instructions from Premier & Cabinet wrongly, so instead of admitting that and reissuing permits, the police are instructed to let some ‘lapsed’ permits through and not others. Mine, which expires on the 17th and was cancelled over a week ago, not only still lets me through but apparently will continue to do so until the 21st.

    Most observers say that the tightening of the restrictions had nothing to do with health advice but was about making the job of policing the permits easier.

    Almost everyone pointed out when the closures were mooted that the most sensible option was to create a border north of Albury, so that the 20,000 residents who live on one side of the border and work on the other could continue their lives normally. Of course, it’s easier to block the border at the river (because there’s not many bridges), so rather than do the hard work to begin with, they’ve simply set up on the border line, creating huge traffic jams and constant uncertainty (until I get through the checkpoint, I don’t know if I’ll be at school in ten minutes or at home in over an hour).

    My area has not recorded a single case of COVID within a 50k radius (and the single case was probably a false positive). I’d happily sign a stat dec saying I’ll drive from home to work and back again and not leave the house otherwise, because that’s basically what I’m doing, but there aren’t those options.

  21. Of course, for the Liberals, the pandemic presents a real ideological challenge. They will have to dispose of their ideological fixations if they are to get the economy going again. They are profoundly committed to their ideology. But if they do not at least suspend it they will have to contest an election when unemployment is in the teens, when wages are falling, when house prices are tumbling and bankruptcies soaring.

    The Liberals will have to change themselves so the community can restore their usual settings.

  22. Hello Confessions – more on US police, and the enigma of just which deaths are justified:

    Three Mississippi police officers have been charged with second-degree murder in the death of a black man last year, according to a recently unsealed indictment.

    The indictment alleges that the three officers removed Robinson from his vehicle, body-slammed him on the pavement, and repeatedly struck him in the head and chest.

    Robinson died from bleeding on the brain caused by blunt force trauma to the head,

    Francis Springer, one of the attorneys representing the officers, said that “evidence will show that the officers are not guilty”

    “These officers did exactly what they are trained to do and used an appropriate level of force …”

    Which reads to me that the defence is that lethal force, which is demonstrably what they used, was defendable because they were trained to use same.

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/aug/14/george-robinson-three-mississippi-police-officers-charged-murder

  23. Lol.

    Peter Murphy
    @PeterWMurphy1

    Chris Kenny, Tim Wilson and Prue are trending on Twitter. Sounds like the start of a sick RWNJ joke.

  24. lizzie @ #2522 Saturday, August 15th, 2020 – 4:02 pm

    Player One

    You seems to believe that you are the only one who can see “the truth” and everyone else is bullshitting. It’s a bit annoying.

    Oh, honestly – Zoomster declaring that she has “little interest” in the Labor party? After contesting a seat for them … how many times? And defending them all day here and then admitting she has just signed up as a rep to the Labor conference?

    I have been called gullible, but this one is just a little too hard for even me to believe 🙁

  25. The word I’ve heard from a couple of people brought inside the Labor tent is that Butler is the timid one on emissions policy.

    Anyone lobbying him on environmental matters would have received ‘we need to beware of unintended consequences’. Over and over.

    Which is understandable as the ALP have found itself in the position of having to avoid even the most minuscule of adverse effects of policy change that will have major positive upsides; while the LNP seem to get away with bad policy and no policy that only has negative effects. Accountability double standards is the only playing field available and it isnt new. Which is why the ALP need charismatic leaders and the LNP can get away with Morrison.

  26. Itza,
    Good to see you poking your head above the parapet again. 🙂

    That line of defence for the murderous thugs who call themselves, ‘Police’, seems to run along the lines of, ‘It’s okay that I beat my partner because my father used to beat my mother.’ Ergo, that’s what I was ‘taught’ to do.

  27. C@tmomma @ #2530 Saturday, August 15th, 2020 – 4:14 pm

    Itza,
    Good to see you poking your head above the parapet again. 🙂

    That line of defence for the murderous thugs who call themselves, ‘Police’, seems to run along the lines of, ‘It’s okay that I beat my partner because my father used to beat my mother.’ Ergo, that’s what I was ‘taught’ to do.

    Hi C@t

    MOH is watching some Canadian you-tuber spend hours (literally) unpicking a 1940s radio and putting it back together again. More than enough to drive anyone to drink, or PB !! Hope you’re well.

  28. SK, yeah yeah, and what about the unintended consequences of being timid, eh?

    Butler’s trying to please everyone; Bowen wants to be the smartest guy in the room; Fitzgibbon, jeez I don’t know what’s going on there…

  29. SK, yeah yeah, and what about the unintended consequences of being timid, eh?
    Butler’s trying to please everyone

    I wasnt saying it like it was a good thing. It was his get out of jail card. The environmental groups found him nice in a Carlton Zero way.

  30. P1

    I thought I’d made my feelings about Albo pretty plain!

    And I avoided doing anything in the last State election because I was annoyed with how city-centric the Victorian Labor party was becoming.

    Who knows, I might get inspired again.

  31. Chris Kenny, Tim Wilson and Prue walk into a bar…..

    Says the barman: “This bar is restricted to humans. Can you prove your humanity?”

  32. So Mrs Murray has encouraged me to leave a bit of stubble on. It’s gone quite grey, bit if that’s what she wants…

    Now I have noticed her facebook is full of sexy Sutton memes.

    What’s going on here?

  33. ItzaDream @ #2533 Saturday, August 15th, 2020 – 4:17 pm

    C@tmomma @ #2530 Saturday, August 15th, 2020 – 4:14 pm

    Itza,
    Good to see you poking your head above the parapet again. 🙂

    That line of defence for the murderous thugs who call themselves, ‘Police’, seems to run along the lines of, ‘It’s okay that I beat my partner because my father used to beat my mother.’ Ergo, that’s what I was ‘taught’ to do.

    Hi C@t

    MOH is watching some Canadian you-tuber spend hours (literally) unpicking a 1940s radio and putting it back together again. More than enough to drive anyone to drink, or PB !! Hope you’re well.

    Thanks, Itza, I’m coping with my Diverticulitis as best I can until I move up the waiting list and my number gets called. Other than that, not too bad. We have been used to living away from the madding crowd for 20-odd years so are coping with that side of it quite well and we do get out when we feel like going somewhere to eat or to visit.

    Btw, I have an old 1940s (?) radio your OH could have to pull apart and put back together again if you/he likes. I don’t need it. 🙂

  34. Bugler

    In the last few days, the complaints have really fired up.

    We had the 100 Canberrans stuck on the Victorian side without warning, despite the ACT putting in a flawless plan to get them home safely.

    We have farmers complaining that their stock are dying because they can’t get across the border to feed and water them or to supervise calving and lambing.

    We have carers who can’t get to the people they’ve been caring for, which means that their charges are having to struggle on on their own.

    On the other hand, one carer was saying on the radio the other day that he is now on call 24/7, with no respite care and no visiting help.

    A friend of mine is due to start as a lecturer at CSU. She has been told that she will have to fly to Sydney, isolate for 14 days, and then drive down to Albury.

    If there was some measure of sense to it, none of us would be complaining (well, much! We are human!) It’s the shifting goalposts and pointless measures which are annoying.

  35. Dandy Murray @ #2543 Saturday, August 15th, 2020 – 4:41 pm

    So Mrs Murray has encouraged me to leave a bit of stubble on. It’s gone quite grey, bit if that’s what she wants…

    Now I have noticed her facebook is full of sexy Sutton memes.

    What’s going on here?

    You’ll know there’s something really fishy going on if you catch her checking out the Melbourne property market. 😆

  36. zoomster @ #2544 Saturday, August 15th, 2020 – 4:13 pm

    Bugler

    In the last few days, the complaints have really fired up.

    We had the 100 Canberrans stuck on the Victorian side without warning, despite the ACT putting in a flawless plan to get them home safely.

    We have farmers complaining that their stock are dying because they can’t get across the border to feed and water them or to supervise calving and lambing.

    We have carers who can’t get to the people they’ve been caring for, which means that their charges are having to struggle on on their own.

    On the other hand, one carer was saying on the radio the other day that he is now on call 24/7, with no respite care and no visiting help.

    A friend of mine is due to start as a lecturer at CSU. She has been told that she will have to fly to Sydney, isolate for 14 days, and then drive down to Albury.

    If there was some measure of sense to it, none of us would be complaining (well, much! We are human!) It’s the shifting goalposts and pointless measures which are annoying.

    Dont worry, Scotty has a plan. He always has had one – it is cunning and secret. He is sorry if it doesnt always meet your expectations. His empathy guru reckons that covers it so naf off and blame the nearest lefty – everything is their fault.

  37. Non
    It will be a very narrow passage for the Libs to walk.
    How do you justify spending after so many years of blaming Labor
    It’s a pandemic, will be a dangerous response because Labor can then roll out all the ways in which the Libs have weakened workplace rights and this has had major consequences.

    Tax cuts won’t cut it for people on welfare
    People on welfare are suddenly finding the meaness of the system and it will get worse
    People have spent months stuck at home, they are tuning in to press conferences and Dan Andrews response today will have been heard, not just in Victoria but around the country.
    The Libs can’t claim that any negatives were Labors fault for not supporting them, because Labor has been bi partisan.
    A lot of Mum and Dad property investors are going to struggle with there negatively geared properties.
    The lack of support for uni’s and the increased costs for degrees will not play well with parents who decide to send kids to uni because there are no jobs.
    The aged care disaster will impact at all age levels, there is no way that disaster can be turned around in 12 months.
    How many people are on Jobkeeper, many of them have worked out that the billions protected the employer more than the worker. This will be compounded by those who lost rights and entitlements which benefited business.
    Parents using Childcare are very unhappy with how this sector has been managed, again a federal responsibility.

    I believe that many time poor workers who in the past just saw the Liberal headlines are now looking at more sources of news that aren’t all owned by Murdock, post pandemic they will hopefully be cross checking statements of fact instead of just accepting the status quo.
    Hopefully the strong showing from Labor state premiers may also be a positive.

    Labor will just need to articulate a strong vision based on fairness, job growth and industrial changes and rebuilding the infrastructure needed ready for the next disaster.

  38. Non @ #2523 Saturday, August 15th, 2020 – 4:05 pm

    Of course, for the Liberals, the pandemic presents a real ideological challenge. They will have to dispose of their ideological fixations if they are to get the economy going again. They are profoundly committed to their ideology. But if they do not at least suspend it they will have to contest an election when unemployment is in the teens, when wages are falling, when house prices are tumbling and bankruptcies soaring.

    The Liberals will have to change themselves so the community can restore their usual settings.

    ‘But if they do not at least suspend it they will have to contest an election when unemployment is in the teens, when wages are falling, when house prices are tumbling and bankruptcies soaring.’
    You mean pretty much like last year? When they won?

  39. Assantdj @ #2547 Saturday, August 15th, 2020 – 4:50 pm

    Non
    It will be a very narrow passage for the Libs to walk.
    How do you justify spending after so many years of blaming Labor
    It’s a pandemic, will be a dangerous response because Labor can then roll out all the ways in which the Libs have weakened workplace rights and this has had major consequences.

    Tax cuts won’t cut it for people on welfare
    People on welfare are suddenly finding the meaness of the system and it will get worse
    People have spent months stuck at home, they are tuning in to press conferences and Dan Andrews response today will have been heard, not just in Victoria but around the country.
    The Libs can’t claim that any negatives were Labors fault for not supporting them, because Labor has been bi partisan.
    A lot of Mum and Dad property investors are going to struggle with there negatively geared properties.
    The lack of support for uni’s and the increased costs for degrees will not play well with parents who decide to send kids to uni because there are no jobs.
    The aged care disaster will impact at all age levels, there is no way that disaster can be turned around in 12 months.
    How many people are on Jobkeeper, many of them have worked out that the billions protected the employer more than the worker. This will be compounded by those who lost rights and entitlements which benefited business.
    Parents using Childcare are very unhappy with how this sector has been managed, again a federal responsibility.

    I believe that many time poor workers who in the past just saw the Liberal headlines are now looking at more sources of news that aren’t all owned by Murdock, post pandemic they will hopefully be cross checking statements of fact instead of just accepting the status quo.
    Hopefully the strong showing from Labor state premiers may also be a positive.

    Labor will just need to articulate a strong vision based on fairness, job growth and industrial changes and rebuilding the infrastructure needed ready for the next disaster.

    The current Labor leadership couldn’t articulate a short order at a fast food drive through.

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