Essential Research and Morgan: more coronavirus polling

Two new polls suggest support for the federal government’s handling of the coronavirus crisis is still on the rise.

I’ll be taking part in the Political Geekfest videocast through Zoom with Peter Lewis of Essential Research and Katharine Murphy of the Guardian Australia at 1pm AEST today, which you can register for here. The subject of discussion will be this:

• The Guardian reports on another Essential Research poll focusing mostly on coronavirus, which would appear to be a weekly thing at least for the time being. The latest poll finds 59% rating the government’s response as about right, up from 46% last week and 39% in the two previous weekly polls; 13% rating it an overreaction, continuing its downward trajectory from 33% to 18% to 17%; and 29% rating it an underreaction, which bounced around over the first three weeks from 28% to 43% to 37%. Respondents were also asked to rate their state governments’ reactions, though with sample sizes too small to be of that much use at the individual level: the combined responses for very good and quite good were at 56% for New South Wales, 76% for Victoria, 52% for Queensland, 79% for Western Australia and 72% for South Australia. The poll also records a surprisingly high level of general morale, producing an average 6.7 rating on a scale of one to ten, unchanged from May last year. The full report should be published later today. UPDATE: Full report here.

• Also apparently a weekly thing is Roy Morgan’s coronavirus polling, which is being conducted online and not by SMS as I previously assumed – indeed, I believe this is the first online polling Morgan has ever published. Last week’s tranche showed a sharp rise in approval of the government’s handling of the matter from a week previous, with 21% strongly agreeing the government was handling the matter well (up twelve), 44% less strongly agreeing (up ten), 23% disagreeing (down ten) and 6% strongly disagreeing (down ten). Respondents had also become more optimistic since the previous week (59% saying the worst was yet to come, down 26 points, 33% saying the situation would remain the same, up 22 points, and 8% expecting things to improve, up four), and, contra Essential, slightly more inclined to consider the threat was being exaggerated (up five points to 20%, with disagreement down six to 75%). The poll was conducted last weekend from a sample of 987.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,397 comments on “Essential Research and Morgan: more coronavirus polling”

Comments Page 19 of 28
1 18 19 20 28
  1. Sophie Scott (ABC medical reporter)
    @sophiescott2
    · 1h
    Replying to @leighsales
    Teachers are the ones who are at risk from schools being open.

  2. Is Moses Morrison trying to bully parents and the state Premiers?

    Tanya Plibersek
    @tanya_plibersek
    ·
    3h
    This is already a stressful time for parents.

    The last thing they need is mixed messages from government.

    Everyone wants kids back at school as soon as it’s safe.

    But the Prime Minister is saying one thing, while some state governments are saying another.

  3. and while the government expects a debate on the privacy

    but will use every scare tactic it can to bluster its way into ranking up another notch up in their surveillance ideology.

  4. Helena_H
    @HelenaH53227013
    ·
    1h
    Replying to
    @vanOnselenP
    This is an example of PM changing the narrative from Ruby Princess stuff up by Border Force to schools… And it’s worked

  5. lizzie says: Wednesday, April 15, 2020 at 10:15 am

    “A giant fatberg weighing 42 tonnes has been removed from a Melbourne sewer…”

    I thought Clive was still in Queensland.

  6. Imacca

    Hope you make a full and speedy recovery.

    Lifting intrastate travel for WA in 3-4 weeks seems feasible…..excluding vulnerable areas such as indigenous communities…and continuing social distancing

    Many people have had to cancel their Easter travel plans and overseas holidays and could stimulate the economy through local holidays over the next 6 months

    Not sure how popular Rottnest will be though

  7. The employer led stimulus package (s) “reek” of lack of transparency and self-interest. The premise upon which they/it is based (that which is good for business is good for all) is so precipitous with hurdles and pitfalls that it’s a certainty to go the way of all Morrison’s past excursions which begin with great fanfare and end abruptly with a sudden departure together with details camouflaged in secrecy.
    The school attendance imbroglio is as good an example of intransigence, almost Trump-like in its audacity and pig-headedness, based on elitist discriminatory reasoning and petulance.
    The utter failure of border force as a institutional bedrock is as alarming as flatulence in a lift, everyone with responsibility for leadership and good governance all looking anywhere but towards the child-care provider as he bunkers down beyond the horizon.
    The Morrison thing runs on luck, smothered in sleight of hand and a malicious right wing media aspiring/claiming to own the news they should be reporting on.
    Mordern Australian media is a failed business model.
    If Australia were at war, would Morrison be the rallying call to defend Australia’s interests? Hardly!
    The next chapters of the 2020 pandemic are not written but it’s probably time to write Morrison out of the story!

  8. Blobbit

    You’re not boring and seem to have a sensible view of things

    Just need to remember that some are only looking for an argument and others will always want the last word.

    Now get get back to taking over the world!

  9. Sprocket

    [Another mealy mouthed High Court judgement – warrant quashed on a technicality, the substantive argument on freedom of political discourse ignored]

    We don’t have the judgment yet, do we?

  10. PeeBee @ #879 Wednesday, April 15th, 2020 – 9:59 am

    Lizzie, ‘ever what it’s cracked up to be. Bushfire recovery seems to have fallen into a hole, too.’

    There is one unintended consequences of that ‘hole’ that is a relief.

    One poster earlier complained that very few businesses close by her received very little to no bushfire relief. Since then she has ceased posting ‘helpful’ comments about Labor.

    😆 😆 😆

  11. Instinctively I want to react against the mobile tracking app.

    But.

    It really would be useful to do that rapid, automatic, contact tracing, and I can see how having sufficient adoption in the general public would allow for different decisions to be made regarding how restrictions get lifted.

    If it’s a choice between extending lockdowns and putting up with flare-ups that they struggle to trace and control, or letting them easily trace my movements while restoring some normality faster, I guess I would choose the latter.

    So I think I would install the app, despite my hostility to the general concept.

    I would be first to disable/uninstall it when we get past this, though, of course.

  12. Blobbit,
    I respect your contributions also. There’s more than one way to skin a cat remember (and I apologise for being unable to think of anything less horror-inducing than the imagery that goes along with that saying to say). 😀

  13. Well I’ve been doing more spring cleaning in autumn here. The light is so clear and clean and crisp and the air so cool but not cold, that it encourages you to get up and do something about all the dust and grime you can see clearly now. Plus I can’t just up and go out for a coffee with friends anymore. 🙂

  14. Shoppers have stopped hoarding and instead are bunkering down with sharp falls in spending across the board with Victorian and NSW consumers snapping their wallets tight.

    Figures compiled by the Commonwealth Bank based on its extensive credit and debit card network suggests the combination of coronavirus-linked shutdowns and early hoarding is now hitting the entire retail sector.

    In the week to April 10, spending on clothing is now 58 per cent lower than for the same time last year. Transport spending (44 per cent), personal care and beauty products (61 per cent) and recreation (37 per cent) have also recorded huge falls.

  15. Blobbit

    I was going to not post today, because frankly I’m getting boring.

    Nah,keep ’em coming. Besides, even if you were then it is far better for you to be ‘boring Bludgers” than furthering the world domination plans of the “military-industrial-big pharma-death mill industry” 😆

  16. nath @ #888 Wednesday, April 15th, 2020 – 10:20 am

    Crying Jim Chalmers just repeats homilies that have little meaning but which the ALP stooges read great things within. He should be replaced by Dr Leigh.

    I believe that’s Dr Cryin Jim Chalmers. I’m a fan of Leigh but he has a most unfortunately grating mode of speaking, which is a handicap.
    Could we please limit the handicaps this time ’round.

  17. “DMsays:
    Wednesday, April 15, 2020 at 10:41 am
    Blobbit

    You’re not boring and seem to have a sensible view of things”

    Ta. And thanks Catmomma.

    I’ve always had a talent for self pity 😉

    I’m starting away from the schools discussion. I find it too emotive and I don’t particularly like the way I respond.

    I”m just finding the reduction of this discussion into sides frustrating. Anyway, I’ll do my best to stay quiet today, but I’ll still have a read.

    Good luck all.

  18. Shellbell

    The Guardian

    The Court unanimously ordered that the warrant be quashed. A majority of the Court declined to grant the injunctive relief sought by the plaintiffs, pointing to the plaintiffs’ inability to identify a sufficient right or interest that required protection by way of a mandatory injunction.

    That’s the key bit – Smethurst has won, but the court has not ordered the material to be deleted. That’s why it’s only a partial win, and Smethurst and her source are still exposed to risk of prosecution.

    ———————————–

    Full judgment: http://eresources.hcourt.gov.au/downloadPdf/2020/HCA/14

    Summary: https://www.hcourt.gov.au/assets/publications/judgment-summaries/2020/hca-14-2020-04-15.pdf

  19. Sprocket

    Thanks.

    A big mouthful of a judgment.

    Fascinating on the question of whether AFP should be ordered to have returned info. The question appears to be:

    If an illegal search reveals arguably criminal behaviour, can the searcher be obliged to destroy all information obtained? At one level, the answer seems obvious since all jurisdictions recognise a right to use illegally obtained evidence in certain circumstances.

  20. Paul Karp on twitter

    #breaking Smethurst has won high court challenge, the raid warrant was invalid. The warrant is quashed, but only two judges ordered material be destroyed. So a mixed result, partial win but still at risk of police using info. #auspol #auslaw

    FULL REPORT: High court rules AFP warrant for raid on News Corp journalist’s home was invalid – but declines to order police to delete material gathered. Smethurst and sources still at risk. #auspol #auslaw
    ————————–

    Australian Criminal Law @CriminalLawAus 34m
    Replying to @denniallen and @Paul_Karp

    The Court held that the law requires that the court hearing any future prosecution have a discretion to decide, in all the circumstances, whether to allow a prosecutor to rely on this evidence. To now destroy the material would be inconsistent with that.

  21. High Court unanimously rules warrant relied upon by Australian Federal Police to authorise search of press gallery journalist Annika Smethurst was invalid and should be quashed.
    News Corp reporter Annika Smethurst had her Canberra apartment raided in 2019 over stories she wrote revealing secret plans to expand the government’s spying powers.

    The full bench of the High Court on Wednesday unanimously found there was not enough precision in the drafting of the warrant.

    However, only two judges ordered that material seized during the search be destroyed, meaning it could still be used by police.

    The court did not consider whether the Australian Federal Police raid infringed on implied freedom of political communication.

    The AFP has been ordered to pay court costs.

  22. A newly discovered asteroid about the size of a house will zip safely by Earth on Wednesday (April 15), passing just inside the orbit of the moon.

    The asteroid 2020 GH2 will pass Earth at a range of about 223,000 miles (359,000 kilometers). The average distance from the Earth to the moon is about 239,000 miles (385,000 km).

    According to NASA’s Asteroid Watch program, asteroid 2020 GH2 is about between 43 and 70 feet (13-70 meters) wide, or about the size of a detached house. It was first discovered on Saturday (April 11) and is being tracked by astronomers at several observatories, including the Catalina Sky Survey at Mount Lemmon in Arizona, according to the Minor Planet Center at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

  23. Thank you Pegasus.

    Under the Commonwealth Evidence Act, the court would be required to apply s138:

    138 Discretion to exclude improperly or illegally obtained evidence
    (1) Evidence that was obtained:
    (a) improperly or in contravention of an Australian law; or
    (b) in consequence of an impropriety or of a contravention of an Australian law;
    is not to be admitted unless the desirability of admitting the evidence outweighs the undesirability of admitting evidence that has been obtained in the way in which the evidence was obtained.
    (2) …
    (3) Without limiting the matters that the court may take into account under subsection (1), it is to take into account:
    (a) the probative value of the evidence; and
    (b) the importance of the evidence in the proceeding; and
    (c) the nature of the relevant offence, cause of action or defence and the nature of the subject‑matter of the proceeding; and
    (d) the gravity of the impropriety or contravention; and
    (e) whether the impropriety or contravention was deliberate or reckless; and
    (f) whether the impropriety or contravention was contrary to or inconsistent with a right of a person recognised by the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; and
    (g) whether any other proceeding (whether or not in a court) has been or is likely to be taken in relation to the impropriety or contravention; and
    (h) the difficulty (if any) of obtaining the evidence without impropriety or contravention of an Australian law.

  24. High Court: AFP search of journalist’s home was illegal

    https://www.afr.com/politics/high-court-rules-afp-search-of-journalist-s-home-was-illegal-20200415-p54jxv

    A Federal Police search of the home of a journalist who wrote stories about a possible expansion of the government’s spying powers was conducted under an invalid warrant, the High Court has ruled.

    In a unanimous decision, the court said the AFP was not entitled to seize material from the Canberra home of Annika Smethurst on June 3. 2019, because the warrant was too imprecise and “impossibly wide”.

    News Corp journalist Annika Smethurst, whose home was raided by federal police. Dominic Lorrimer

    However, it declined to grant an injunction that would have required the AFP to return or destroy the data it took from Ms Smethurst’s mobile phone.

    Ms Smethurst wrote in News Corp publications in April 2018 that there were moves to expand the powers of the Australian Signals Directorate.

    The court said the warrant “relied upon there being ‘reasonable grounds for suspecting'” there would be evidence related to the commission of a Commonwealth indictable offence.

  25. “Ouch. Hope you are getting better.”

    Ta Vic. Not allowed to drive for a week and busted ribs still sore, but getting better.
    The couple of days of serious hallucination were……..interesting. 🙂

    “Two words: Sundown Clause””

    2 VERY important words. There are going to be a lot of RWNJobbies with an agenda to push, particularly on industrial relations and taxation, who are going to oppose any use of that concept with deep passion and vigor. They don’t want to waste a good disaster if they can inflict the consequences on other people.

  26. lizzie @ #852 Wednesday, April 15th, 2020 – 9:14 am

    No ‘handout’ by the Morrison gov is ever what it’s cracked up to be. Bushfire recovery seems to have fallen into a hole, too.

    Sure has. Do you know what Centrelink now says when we try to chase up why we STILL (after 4 months) have not received the bushfire support we were supposed to be entitled to? “Oh, we can’t help you with bushfire stuff right now – we’re busy with Coronavirus!”

    You can’t make this shit up.

  27. Nancy Pelosi Rips Trump To Shreds, Calling Him A ‘Weak’ Leader Who Caused Needless Death

    In a devastating letter to Democratic colleagues Tuesday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi decimated Donald Trump

    In order to move forward, we must first understand the truth of what has put us in this position:

    • The truth is that Donald Trump dismantled the infrastructure handed to him which was meant to plan for and overcome a pandemic, resulting in unnecessary deaths and economic disaster.

    • The truth is that in January Donald Trump was warned about this pandemic, ignored those warnings, took insufficient action and caused unnecessary death and disaster.

    • The truth is that Donald Trump told his most loyal followers that the pandemic was a hoax and that it would magically disappear, thus endangering lives and paving the way for economic disaster.

    • The truth is that we did not have proper testing available in March despite Trump repeatedly claiming that we did; and even now, we do not have adequate tests, masks, PPE, and necessary equipment, which creates unnecessary death and suffering.

    • The truth is because of an incompetent reaction to this health crisis, the strong economy handed to Donald Trump is now a disaster, causing the suffering of countless Americans and endangering lives.

    • The truth is a weak person, a poor leader, takes no responsibility. A weak person blames others.

    https://www.politicususa.com/2020/04/14/pelosi-drops-brutal-letter-calling-out-trump-as-an-imcompetent-leader-who-caused-needless-death.html

  28. Consumer confidence has collapsed to record the biggest monthly decline in the 47-year history of the Westpac-Melbourne Institute Index of Consumer Sentiment.

    Consumer confidence plunged 17.7 per cent in February to 75.6. It is the lowest since the recession in the early 1990s and early 1980s.

    “Certainly we cannot rule out the Index dropping below the historic low of 64.6 we saw in November 1990,” Westpac chief economist Bill Evans said.

    “The most surprising message is the collapse in confidence in the housing market.”

    All five component sub-indexes fell in April. By far the biggest falls were in the near term outlook for the economy and in attitudes towards spending – reflecting the immediate effects of the shut-down.

    The ‘economy, next 12 months’ sub-index recorded a spectacular 31% drop (the biggest monthly fall on record), taking it to 53.7.

    That compares to a low of 53.2 during the GFC and lows during previous recessions of 34.2 (early 1990s) and 42.1 (early 1980s).

  29. The cops took your stuff illegally but it looks your stuff might have been given to you illegally.

    At one level it is no different to a shit warrant which when executed reveals a massive drug supply.

  30. phoenixRED @ #932 Wednesday, April 15th, 2020 – 11:36 am

    Nancy Pelosi Rips Trump To Shreds, Calling Him A ‘Weak’ Leader Who Caused Needless Death

    In a devastating letter to Democratic colleagues Tuesday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi decimated Donald Trump

    In order to move forward, we must first understand the truth of what has put us in this position:

    • The truth is that Donald Trump dismantled the infrastructure handed to him which was meant to plan for and overcome a pandemic, resulting in unnecessary deaths and economic disaster.

    • The truth is that in January Donald Trump was warned about this pandemic, ignored those warnings, took insufficient action and caused unnecessary death and disaster.

    • The truth is that Donald Trump told his most loyal followers that the pandemic was a hoax and that it would magically disappear, thus endangering lives and paving the way for economic disaster.

    • The truth is that we did not have proper testing available in March despite Trump repeatedly claiming that we did; and even now, we do not have adequate tests, masks, PPE, and necessary equipment, which creates unnecessary death and suffering.

    • The truth is because of an incompetent reaction to this health crisis, the strong economy handed to Donald Trump is now a disaster, causing the suffering of countless Americans and endangering lives.

    • The truth is a weak person, a poor leader, takes no responsibility. A weak person blames others.

    https://www.politicususa.com/2020/04/14/pelosi-drops-brutal-letter-calling-out-trump-as-an-imcompetent-leader-who-caused-needless-death.html

    I wonder if Pelosi would be up for an advisory role at ALP HQ?
    Or, just take Gentle Jim on as a private student?

  31. Seth Abramson (@ )‏Verified account @SethAbramson

    This is what he is focused on as tens of thousands of people die :

    In unprecedented move, Trump administration orders president’s name to be printed on millions of Americans’ stimulus checks

    On Tuesday, reports showed that President Donald Trump plans to require the Treasury Department to put his name on every paper stimulus check that goes out to U.S. households — with the result that many people’s checks will be delayed unnecessarily for political points.

    Commenters on social media were outraged by the president’s decision to put his own ego above ensuring that critical relief goes out to Americans in a timely fashion.

    https://www.rawstory.com/2020/04/trump-ripped-for-transparent-campaign-stunt-get-his-name-on-stimulus-checks/

  32. sprocket @10:32
    Another mealy mouthed High Court judgement – warrant quashed on a technicality, the substantive argument on freedom of political discourse ignored

    Actually that’s pretty standard for Judges. They will not enter into a big difficult question if a case can be resolved on a narrow technical basis. Only decide what needs to be decided to resolve the case in front of you is the thinking.

  33. shellbell @ #933 Wednesday, April 15th, 2020 – 12:15 pm

    At one level it is no different to a shit warrant which when executed reveals a massive drug supply.

    Well yes. In that they should have to go back and investigate the drugs thing properly and without the benefit of anything they found on their shit warrant if they want to get you on the drugs thing.

    If law enforcement doesn’t follow the law to the letter…there goes the entire basis for expecting anyone else to do so.

  34. C@tmomma:

    At least I didn’t call people who contribute to this blog, ‘rats’ who ‘infest this blog’, simply because they didn’t agree with me that Bernie Sanders was the best thing going around the Democratic Primaries.

    You love to make shit up about anyone who has different opinions to you. That’s not at all why I called your ilk rats who infest this blog.

    Greensboro Growler:

    Their previous latest take was that Biden did not have the endorsement of either Sanders or Obama, so therefore…………….

    ‘Their’? I never pegged you as being one to use gender-neutral pronouns; especially when I have ‘Mr’ in my username. I’d love for you to show me where I said anything to that effect.

  35. I love the rabid & inconsistent responses from the right. Apparently if the WHO had banned wet markets then we wouldn’t be in this mess.
    Of course this is balanced with the view that the UN is dysfunctional group trying to dictate to democratic governments in respect to human rights and should shut the f*ck up and stay out.
    The RWNJ’s are going on about how the WHO is allowing wet food markets to reopen (which is just any market that is selling produce from live animals). Of course if the WHO tried to stop a country from opening or closing a market of any kind they’d be told to sod off.
    Of course it’s not surprising that the brain dead are following the lead of Trump and the Murdoch press as objective thinking is beyond them.
    I am more concerned with what will happen between the US and China between now and November as Trump tries to apportion blame for his inaction on external agencies.
    Trying to Blame WHO won’t work for long as those countries that ACTUALLY LISTENED to the WHO recommendations are in a far better shape than the US. This is including the period before Covid where the WHO guidelines for Wet Markets and disease control (going back to programs in the 20th Century and early 2000’s) were followed. The local US press is pointing this out to Trump who is reacting very badly indeed (the term Trump Tangerine Toddler Tantrum being a favorite description).
    Of course when the WHO can’t be blamed Trump and the Republican base will start taking aim at China in more and more bellicose ways. As much as I hate to say this, if the US is not in a war come November we’ll be lucky, of course we can only hope our mob of clueless tools don’t follow Trump into anything we will regret (as seems to be historically the case with Federal Liberal Governments).

  36. Virgin shareholders pass up deal, search moves to white knights

    Four of the five opted out, sources said, while the fifth was a “maybe”.

    The four to opt out were Etihad Airways, Singapore Airlines, Nanshan Group and HNA Group, who together own 80 per cent of the company.

    The “maybe” was Richard Branson’s Virgin Group, whose attachment to the Australian business goes beyond its 10 per cent stake.

    So Virgin’s search moves to potential new investors – and it is understood to be particularly keen on Australian investors……

    It remains to be seen whether any investors will take the bait. The equity search is running at the same time as a debt restructure, which would be expected to see the company’s lenders take a big haircut on their investments.

    (Current) Equity holders are expected to be wiped out, whichever way the deal goes. The five strategic investors account for about 90 per cent of the share register.

    Full story –

    https://www.afr.com/street-talk/virgin-shareholders-pass-up-deal-search-moves-to-white-knights-20200415-p54jwg

Comments Page 19 of 28
1 18 19 20 28

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *