New Hampshire Democratic primary live commentary

Live commentary on today’s New Hampshire primary. Also: Sinn Féin upsets the conservative duopoly at Saturday’s Irish election. Guest post by Adrian Beaumont

4:05pm Thursday With all precincts reporting, there were almost 297,000 votes in this year’s Democratic primary, up from just over 253,000 in 2016.  So Democratic turnout in New Hampshire was well up on 2016, but this is partly explained by having an uncontested Republican race.

The final outcome is Sanders 25.7%, Buttigieg 24.4%, Klobuchar 19.8%, Warren 9.2% and Biden 8.4%.

8:18pm Conversation article up.  I argue that Klobuchar has a good case for being electable.  She won her three Minnesota Senate races by at least 20 points, far exceeding the presidential lean of Minnesota.  She’s 59, so she doesn’t fall into the 70+ category.

Also, the FiveThirtyEight forecast has the chance that nobody wins a pledged delegate majority up to 33% (one in three).  We could be heading for the first contested convention since 1952.  The next two contests are the Feb 22 Nevada caucus and Feb 29 South Carolina primary.  Then it’s Super Tuesday on March 3.

3:05pm Two US TV networks have CALLED the New Hampshire primary for Bernie Sanders.

2:50pm With 82% in, Sanders’ lead over Buttigieg down to 1.7%.  The NY Times Needle gives him a 68% chance to win.  Hardly a convincing victory in a state where he crushed Clinton 60-38 in 2016.

2:22pm Sanders’ lead over Buttigieg down to 2.1% with 69% in.  The NY Times Needle gives Sanders a 59% chance to win.

2:07pm Took a break for lunch, but didn’t miss much.  Sanders 2.5% ahead of Buttigieg with 64% in (26.4% to 23.9%).  Klobuchar has 20.1%, and both Biden and Warren have less than 10%, and will both miss the 15% threshold to win any NH delegates.

1:02pm CNN has Sanders still ahead in NH by 4.4% over Buttigieg with 41% in.

1pm The NY Times needle is now giving Sanders just a 53% chance to win, with 33% for Buttigieg and 14% Klobuchar.  However, Wasserman on Twitter is projecting Klobuchar will finish third.

12:47pm The NY Times needle is giving Sanders a 59% chance of winning, with Buttigieg a 33% chance and Klobuchar 8%.  But for some reason, CNN’s results are more up to date than the NY Times.

12:37pm With 32% in in the Dem primary, 27.8% Sanders, 23.5% Buttigieg, 20.0% Klobuchar.  Gap opening up between Buttigieg and Klobuchar for 2nd place.  Warren and Biden still at less than 10%.

12:35pm In the Republican primary, Trump has 85%.

12:25pm Dave Wasserman on Twitter

12:17pm 28% Sanders, 23% Buttigieg, 21% Klobuchar with 20% in on the CNN results.

12:12pm 28% Sanders, 22.5% Buttigieg, 20.5% Klobuchar, less than 10% for both Warren and Biden in CNN results with 17% in.

12:05pm CNN is back ahead of the NY Times, and has 28% Sanders, 22% Buttigieg, 20% Klobuchar, 9% Warren, 9% Biden with 14% in.

12pm With 7% in, 28% Sanders, 22% Buttigieg, 20% Klobuchar, 12% Warren, 7.5% Biden.  US election analysts on Twitter are saying Sanders should win.

11:50am With 5% reporting, the NY Times has 30% Sanders, 22% Buttigieg, 18% Klobuchar, 12% Warren and just 7% Biden.

11:40am The CNN New Hampshire results give Sanders 27%, Klobuchar 22%, Buttigieg 21%, Warren just 11% and Biden 8%.  That’s with an estimated 3% in.  So Klobuchar has had a massive surge in New Hampshire.

Guest post by Adrian Beaumont, who joins us from time to time to provide commentary on elections internationally. Adrian is an honorary associate at the University of Melbourne. His work on electoral matters for The Conversation can be found here, and his own website is here.

The final RealClearPolitics poll average for today’s New Hampshire Democratic primary gives Bernie Sanders 28.7%, Pete Buttigieg 21.3%, Amy Klobuchar 11.7%, and Joe Biden and Elizabeth Warren both 11.0%. Most polls close at 11am AEDT, with some staying open until 12pm. Unlike Iowa, New Hampshire is a primary, not a caucus. Primaries are administered by the state’s election authorities, not by a party. Counting is slow in New Hampshire.

 Sinn Féin comes first in Irish election

 Irish politics has been dominated by two conservative parties: Fianna Fáil and Fine Gael. But at Saturday’s election, the far-left Sinn Féin upset this order by coming first on first preferences with 24.5% (up a massive 10.7% since the 2016 election). Fianna Fáil was second with 22.2% (down 2.1%) and the governing Fine Gael third with 20.9% (down 4.7%). The Greens won 7.1% (up 4.4%). Irish Labour has never been a strong party, and won just 4.4% (down 2.2%).

While Sinn Féin advocates a united Ireland, its success at this election appears to be the result of a campaign focused on homelessness and hospital waiting lists.

Despite winning the popular vote, Sinn Féin was second in lower house seats with 37 of the 160 (up 14). Fianna Fáil won 38 (down six), Fine Gael 35 (down 14), the Greens 12 (up ten), other left-wing parties 17 (up one) and independents 19 (steady). There were two more total seats than in 2016. A Fianna Fáil/Fine Gael grand coalition would have 73 seats, short of the 81 needed for a majority. Government formation is likely to be difficult.

In Tasmania’s Hare-Clark system, which is used in Ireland, leakage from within parties has occasionally cost seats. In Ireland, leakage is a bigger problem, as the ballot paper lists candidates alphabetically, not by party grouping (see Antony Green). To reduce leakage, Sinn Féin only nominated 42 candidates, and were unable to benefit as much as they should have from their late campaign surge.

Previous Irish elections have been held during the working week, but this one was on Saturday. Turnout was expected to increase, but it actually fell 2.2% to 62.9%.

610 comments on “New Hampshire Democratic primary live commentary”

  1. You are overthinking things Bell.

    In the recent mid terms, a whole slew of ex-military, ex-CIA, Democratic candidates flipped Republican seats. There is a great deal of respect and support broadly for those who serve the USA, and Buttigieg is ticking that box.

    Dotard has spent his presidency shitcanning this cohort.

  2. “A lot of commentary about Buttegieg’s lack of experience – he has a ready rebuttal…”

    ***

    Yeaaaah if he wants to keep winning over progressive peace loving lefties then I wouldn’t be going too far down that road if I were him. It doesn’t qualify him for anything other than war. Will do wonders for him with warmongering conservatives but at the end of the day they’re still going to hate him anyway because most of them are homophobic dinosaurs.

  3. Nicholas @ #400 Thursday, February 13th, 2020 – 8:19 am

    To think that the US economy is strong you have to be insulated from the effects of bad economy policy. This is the case for all of the centrist media pundits who keep saying that the economy is strong. Their word is not going to override voters’ lived experiences of how insecure, hard, and precarious their lives are.

    That rings true for just about every “Western” democracy. With the possible exception of the Scandinavian countries. It certainly rings true in Australia.

  4. I am not a Bernie Sanders fan (I prefer Warren) but the attacks have already started on him and already they are outrageous. In this case Lloyd Blankfein – former CEO of Goldman Sachs at the time they needed to be bailed out with billions in Tarp funds after nearly crashing following the GFC – thinks that Bernie is a threat to the US economy. Is he a bigger threat than Blankfein?
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/markets/he-ll-ruin-our-economy-wall-street-billionaire-takes-aim-at-bernie-sanders-20200213-p540b0.html

  5. Nicholas

    The ‘lived experience’ includes all those boomers and GenX 401(k) holders. They can see their wealth increase in near real-time (as do those with large super balances here)

    Now are these ‘protect my pile’ people more motivated to vote than the larger cohort of minimum wagers?

    Point being, that pension funds are leveraged to stock market performance in part.

  6. A lot of commentary about Buttegieg’s lack of experience – he has a ready rebuttal…

    It is interesting that the trend of Presidents having military experience has almost ceased. If you exclude stateside service, only 1 (Bush senior) of the last 6 has served in a war zone. This is explainable by the passing of time from WWII and Vietnam. But notable that none of the oldies vying for President in 2020 (who were the right age for serving in Vietnam) have military experience.

    IMHO, Buttigieg and Gabbard’s military experience is a major plus. Although it didnt help Ojeda and Moulton.

  7. And it was less than 30% who voted for him.

    Well less, if you are talking percentage of ‘voting age population’. I am using ‘likely voter’ percentage.

  8. “Well less, if you are talking percentage of ‘voting age population’. I am using ‘likely voter’ percentage.”

    ***

    It was something round 27% of eligible voters from memory. Of course over 100m eligible voters did not vote. Lazy fools.

  9. Kakuru – Indeed. And another fun fact is that this is the longest period in US where a President hasn’t died in office. It’s been just over 56 years since JFK was assassinated, beating the 52 years since Washington inauguration in 1789 and the hubristic death of William Henry Harrison in 1841 (just one month into his term, dying of pneumonia after catching a cold at his inauguration, reputedly refusing to wear a coat while giving a two-hour speech in freezing weather). Given the age of many of the prospective candidates, it seems quite possible that this run might be about to end.

  10. Socrates @ #404 Thursday, February 13th, 2020 – 11:27 am

    I am not a Bernie Sanders fan (I prefer Warren) but the attacks have already started on him and already they are outrageous. In this case Lloyd Blankfein – former CEO of Goldman Sachs at the time they needed to be bailed out with billions in Tarp funds after nearly crashing following the GFC – thinks that Bernie is a threat to the US economy. Is he a bigger threat than Blankfein?
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/markets/he-ll-ruin-our-economy-wall-street-billionaire-takes-aim-at-bernie-sanders-20200213-p540b0.html

    Published by the SMH, originally from the New York Times.

  11. Sanders looks to be in far better shape than Trump, that’s for sure. He’s got far more fight in him than all the other candidates combined. All this talk about age and health is just desperate nonsense from the establishment. Still no mention of Bloomberg being pretty much the same age (there’s a mere 5 months between Bernie and him). What a surprise.

  12. Hi kakaru,
    Media talking heads and blog hack pundits enjoy trying out combinations (guilty as charged!). In all seriousness tho, in your opinion, why wouldnt a candidate for dem pres nominee vet and choose and announce a VP running mate early (as in, earlier than the current norm)? Especially as a dem candidate seems to be expected to cover so many bases (black, white, brown, female, progressive, moderate….). And lets face it, the norm has changed over the centuries. Why not change again?

    The media were abuzz with the early chatter about Warren and Gillum. And why wouldnt Warren look to such a running mate early – adding something (diversity, energy, funding etc) to her campaign?

  13. Firefoxsays:
    Thursday, February 13, 2020 at 11:51 am
    “Sanders looks to be in far better shape than Trump, that’s for sure. He’s got far more fight in him than all the other candidates combined. All this talk about age and health is just desperate nonsense from the establishment. Still no mention of Bloomberg being pretty much the same age (there’s a mere 5 months between Bernie and him). What a surprise.”

    Hmm. Trump is the only one who falls into the “Boomer” generation – and then only just (born 1946). Sanders and Bloomberg are “WW2 babies”. Isn’t it time the US moved on.

  14. Hugoaugogo
    Yes, good point. Also, certain Presidents chose not to seek a 2nd term, even though they were eligible (Coolidge, LBJ), but they deemed themselves not fit enough to endure a 2nd term. These days, health care and outcomes being what they are (at least for privileged Americans), I’m not sure age is as much of an issue as it used to be.

  15. Kakuru @ #418 Thursday, February 13th, 2020 – 12:06 pm

    Hugoaugogo
    Yes, good point. Also, certain Presidents chose not to seek a 2nd term, even though they were eligible (Coolidge, LBJ), but they deemed themselves not fit enough to endure a 2nd term. These days, health care and outcomes being what they are (at least for privileged Americans), I’m not sure age is as much of an issue as it used to be.

    Bernie Sanders had a heart attack. He has the best health care American money can buy. Congressional Health Care. And Donald Trump is no Bernie Sanders! Trump has an atrocious diet and does zero exercise and I’m sure Sanders looks after himself better than that.

  16. “Sanders had a stent put in after heart attack recently. The primaries are not for the faint hearted.”

    ***

    Yet he’s still putting up more of a fight than the establishment candidates. I’m well aware of what happened to Bernie and it doesn’t bother me in the slightest. He’s going very well.

    Trump is by definition obese. He has a very high BMI of 30.5. He was weighed at 243 pounds (110kgs) in 2019 and is known to have a terrible diet (apparently he loves his hamburgers). No mention of that from any of the Bernie bashers, no mention of Bloomberg’s age, just desperate attacks against Sanders from the right wing establishment.

    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trump-physical/trump-puts-on-a-few-pounds-enters-obese-range-medical-report-idUSKCN1Q32WY

  17. Bellwether @ #411 Thursday, February 13th, 2020 – 11:45 am

    Socrates @ #404 Thursday, February 13th, 2020 – 11:27 am

    I am not a Bernie Sanders fan (I prefer Warren) but the attacks have already started on him and already they are outrageous. In this case Lloyd Blankfein – former CEO of Goldman Sachs at the time they needed to be bailed out with billions in Tarp funds after nearly crashing following the GFC – thinks that Bernie is a threat to the US economy. Is he a bigger threat than Blankfein?
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/markets/he-ll-ruin-our-economy-wall-street-billionaire-takes-aim-at-bernie-sanders-20200213-p540b0.html

    Published by the SMH, originally from the New York Times.

    And the reason for this attack is more complex than, ‘Bernie bad for the economy’. That is the overt reason. The covert reason for the attack is that Bernie Sanders, though being Jewish, is a supporter of Palestinian Statehood and is no fan of Israel’s territorial aggression. So the Jewish Lobby in America have got it in for him, and they are loud and they have a direct line of access to the media and into the heart of power.

  18. Firefox @ #255 Thursday, February 13th, 2020 – 11:33 am

    “Sanders had a stent put in after heart attack recently. The primaries are not for the faint hearted.”

    ***

    Yet he’s still putting up more of a fight than the establishment candidates.

    Curious about how you assess that metric. Like are you saying Sanders has done quantifiably more traveling/campaign rallies/speeches/etc.. than his opponents? Or making some vague assertion that because people are voting for him he’s therefore working/fighting harder than other candidates?

  19. AR, Bernie is putting up more of a fight by leading an actual movement, offering an agenda of real change, and being the most effective at attacking Trump. The others are just repeating the same shit over and over. Nothing new. The establishment doesn’t know how to take on Trump, that has become painfully obvious. The thing about Bernie and even Trump is that they are both real – Bernie genuinely wants to fix the system and take the power away from the rich elites, while Trump is genuinely an asshole. I’m sorry but he really is. It’s why the MAGA fascists love him so much. They love him because he’s just like them.

  20. C@tmomma @ #422 Thursday, February 13th, 2020 – 12:42 pm

    Bellwether @ #411 Thursday, February 13th, 2020 – 11:45 am

    Socrates @ #404 Thursday, February 13th, 2020 – 11:27 am

    I am not a Bernie Sanders fan (I prefer Warren) but the attacks have already started on him and already they are outrageous. In this case Lloyd Blankfein – former CEO of Goldman Sachs at the time they needed to be bailed out with billions in Tarp funds after nearly crashing following the GFC – thinks that Bernie is a threat to the US economy. Is he a bigger threat than Blankfein?
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/markets/he-ll-ruin-our-economy-wall-street-billionaire-takes-aim-at-bernie-sanders-20200213-p540b0.html

    Published by the SMH, originally from the New York Times.

    And the reason for this attack is more complex than, ‘Bernie bad for the economy’. That is the overt reason. The covert reason for the attack is that Bernie Sanders, though being Jewish, is a supporter of Palestinian Statehood and is no fan of Israel’s territorial aggression. So the Jewish Lobby in America have got it in for him, and they are loud and they have a direct line of access to the media and into the heart of power.

    That’s so true. I must admit I would agree that the Palestinians have had a pretty rough trot, especially under Israel’s present hard-right admin.

  21. Firefox:

    It was something round 27% of eligible voters from memory. Of course over 100m eligible voters did not vote. Lazy fools.

    I don’t think that generalisation is fair. Most importantly, you have to remember that they vote on a working Tuesday rather than a weekend or public holiday like sensible places. This means that working people – particularly those in lower-status jobs that don’t tend to have much flexibility in working hours or leave entitlements – are right off the bat going to find it difficult to vote. I don’t fault those workers for that – they’re being screwed by the system.

    There’s also the fact that the Electoral College system means that there’s really little point in voting in a winner-take-all safe state. Turnout would likely be even lower if it weren’t for down-ballot races that might actually be competitive in those places.

  22. Remember that briefly went by the handle RU for a time until William asked him to stop, which he did.

    I never got the point of any handle he used, or what the problem with RU was either …

  23. “And the reason for this attack is more complex than, ‘Bernie bad for the economy’. That is the overt reason. The covert reason for the attack is that Bernie Sanders, though being Jewish, is a supporter of Palestinian Statehood and is no fan of Israel’s territorial aggression. So the Jewish Lobby in America have got it in for him, and they are loud and they have a direct line of access to the media and into the heart of power.”

    ***

    Yep well said, Cat. The far-right Israeli government is no doubt very concerned about the prospect of a president of Jewish heritage supporting the two state solution and opposing Israeli occupation. They are worried because he can speak to the Jewish people as one of them and they won’t be able to claim he’s being antisemitic by calling for peace, which they often wrongly accuse the left of being. All we want is to see the Jewish and Palestinian people live in peace and stop killing each other.

  24. “ I would be happy with a Bloomberg Kloubacher ticket.”

    I think that ticket of the ‘two Mayors’ – Bloomberg and Buttigieg could work. They have similar policy positions (healthcare, environment etc) and a combined message of urban renewal – pitched by Bloomberg at big cities (with lots of Big city mayor endorsements) would complement a similar ‘small cities’ renewal pitcher by Pete (with lots of small city mayor endorsements).

    Klobuchar-Buttigieg could work.

    Sanders-Brown could also work. Maybe.

  25. It’s not true that the age-related criticisms have been directed only at Bernie. Right from the start it’s been the duo of Bernie and Biden copping it, with Warren also being included sometimes. Biden in particular caught a lot of flack in the earlier debates for anecdotes that made him seem old and out of (“make sure you have the record player on at night.”).

    The reason Biden got more grief then is the same reason Sanders is getting it now – he was the national front-runner, and now Bernie is.

    The commentary on Bloomberg getting into the race has often included oh great, another septuagenarian along with the billionaire thing.

    Oh, and Buttigieg has also received some criticism at the other end, that he’s too young.

  26. “I don’t think that generalisation is fair.”

    ***

    Oh I do. This is the country that constantly lectures the world about how great their democracy is blah blah and yet 100m+ don’t even bother to turn up. I really have little sympathy for people who take democracy for granted. If just a few more people had gotten off their backsides in some of those crucial states then Clinton would be president. Sure, there would be a small number of them who may have legitimate reasons but we’re talking about over 100 million people here. They have pre-polling/mail/absentee voting there too. Many people made the effort to vote that way instead of on election day. There really is no excuse.

    https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/10/21/for-many-americans-election-day-is-already-here/

  27. Sober reading:

    MANCHESTER, N.H. — The Democratic presidential primary is entering an intensely tumultuous phase, after two early contests that have left former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. reeling and elevated Senator Bernie Sanders but failed to make any candidate a dominant force in the battle for the party’s nomination.

    Within the Democratic establishment, the results have deepened a mood of anxiety and frustration: The collapse of Mr. Biden’s support in the first two states, and the fragmentation of moderate voters among several other candidates, allowed Mr. Sanders, a Vermont progressive, to claim a victory in New Hampshire and a split decision in Iowa with former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind.

    In both states, a majority of voters supported candidates closer to the political center and named defeating President Trump as their top priority, but there was no overwhelming favorite among those voters as to which moderate was the best alternative to Mr. Sanders. Unless such a favorite soon emerges, party leaders may increasingly look to Michael R. Bloomberg as a potential savior.

    In an unmistakable sign of Mr. Bloomberg’s growing strength and Mr. Biden’s decline, three black members of Congress endorsed the former mayor of New York City on Wednesday, including Representative Lucy McBath of Georgia, a high-profile lawmaker and gun-control champion in her first term — and a senior adviser to Mr. Bloomberg told campaign staff that internal polling showed the former mayor now tied with Mr. Biden among African-Americans in March primary states.

    The turmoil in the party has the potential to extend the primary season, exacerbating internal divisions and putting off the headache of uniting for the general election for months.

    The Democrats’ proportional system of allocating delegates could make it all but impossible to avert such an outcome. With no winner-take-all contests, and no indication yet that Mr. Sanders can broaden his appeal or that a moderate can coalesce support, the candidates are poised to keep splitting delegates three or four ways, as they did in Iowa and New Hampshire.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/12/us/politics/democrats-new-hampshire-sanders.html

  28. “The reason Biden got more grief then is the same reason Sanders is getting it now – he was the national front-runner, and now Bernie is.”

    ***

    It’s really not. The MSN don’t want Bernie to be the nominee and are doing everything they can to downplay how well his campaign is going. There’s only one person who the establishment media hate more than Bernie – Trump.

    It’s going to be very interesting to watch what happens with the establishment MSM like CNN and MSNBC etc if Sanders wins the nomination. Remember, Fox News intially strongly resisted Trump and even attacked him on behalf of establishment Republicans. It was only once it became obvious to them that he had the far right (their viewers) behind him that they suddenly changed their tune and supported him.

  29. It’s really not.

    Reflexive gainsaying doesn’t do anything to explain away the demonstrable fact that Biden – the presumptive “establishment candidate” – attracted the same kind of age-related catcalls as Sanders.

    Frankly it feels to me like the Bernie campaign has more than held their own in influencing the media narrative. Compare and contrast to, say, the Warren campaign, where a solid third finish in Iowa (handily beating both her pre-caucus polls and the national polling leader at the time) ended up being reported either not at all or as a disappointment.

  30. Rumours and facts in forming an Irish Government
    1. Taoiseach Leo Varadkar has said he is happy to go into opposition if SF can cobble together a left coalition and SF should be given the first chance
    2. SF in “constructive” talks with Soc Dem, Greens and PBP
    3. Labour’s leader Brendan Howlin has resigned. The party will not consider a coalition with SF and probably not with anyone. Some party leaders believe that their Pasokification is due to being the minor partner in FG’s austerity government 2011-16
    4. Some argument in FF if they should consider government with SF but the no side is more vocal
    5. Rumours of negotiations of a grand coalition of FF/FG/Greens which would have 85 seats out of 160. This is now a 3/1 favourite in in the betting. So much for the election producing change

  31. “Reflexive gainsaying doesn’t do anything to explain away the demonstrable fact that Biden – the presumptive “establishment candidate” – attracted the same kind of age-related catcalls as Sanders.”

    ***

    He really hasn’t. Sure, there’s been some attention on it, but only as a result of the Sanders camp rightly pointing out the sheer hypocrisy of the situation.

    By the way, as of tomorrow (US time), there will be two 78 year olds in the race! That’s right, the 14th of Feb is Bloomberg’s birthday! Convenient timing for this argument lol. Happy birthday Mike! Hope that doesn’t make him too old for the establishment like Bernie apparently is.

    As for the media, I’m talking about the mainstream media (MSM), not social media and the net in general where Sanders and his supporters do go very well. I’ve been watching a lot of CNN over the last few weeks and they most certainly have a clear bias against Bernie in favour of the establishment candidates. MSNBC, ABC (the American one), etc… are the same. They will often downplay or completely ignore the Sanders campaign, despite Bernie being the frontrunner. However, they are starting to soften their tone slightly as they begin to realise that he’s their best chance to defeat Trump.

  32. The other thing that bugs me about Bernie boosters (and those for Corbyn not so long ago) is the bloody whinging. Sanders is a candidate for one of the biggest political jobs on the planet, and he is trying to do so pushing a pretty radical program. Of course he’s going to cop some stick for that, and frankly there is nothing wrong with that – if what he wants is so worth it, then it can cope with a bit of critiquing. I find the slightly paranoid assertions of “the Mainstream Media doesn’t want Bernie”, or “the establishment will unite against him” frankly ludicrous. There is no shadowy cabal in either the media or the Democratic Party (if you think the nerve centre of the Democrats is that organised, I draw your attention to Iowa). Sanders is now the front-runner, and as such he’s going to get criticism from all quarters. If he’s as good as you say, then he’ll survive, and he’ll be a better candidate in the general.

    More broadly, I find that Sanders fans can’t seem to ever bring themselves to admit to any flaws in their hero. He’s got significant weaknesses – he’s old, he’s got issues in appealing to minorities, he’s not really a team player (he hasn’t even been a member of the Democratic Party for much of his career), and he’s actually got a pretty thin resume of achievement for a 30 year career. Now, none of this might matter in the greater scheme of things, but his fans don’t help his cause by defensively complaining about every question asked of him.

    So deal with it, Bernie bros – that’s politics.

  33. There’s been some talk of Sherrod Bown being a being VP pick, but I think there’s one very important reason why he won’t be picked. Brown is a (long-time) Senator from Ohio, and if he is elevated to the Veep spot, then the governor of Ohio (Mike de Wine, a Republican) get to pick his replacement. Such is the polarised nature of US politics that he would almost certainly pick a Republican to replace Brown, and even if there was a vote, Ohio is trending GOP. That would badly affect the Democrats Senate position – as things stand, they have some shot at re-taking the Senate in November, but everything needs to go right for them, and they certainly can’t afford to give away seat like Ohio.

  34. So let me get this straight, Hugoaugogo… (call this questioning more “defensive complaining”, if you like)

    Bernie’s advocating for a “pretty radical” program, but he doesn’t appeal to minorities. So, the logical conclusion here is that he appeals to the masses… yet is too radical. How does that work?

    Bernie’s “too old”, he’s a septuagenarian. But so are three of the other candidates still in the race, as well as the current sitting President. How does that work? Should they all just quit?

    “He’s not really a team player (he hasn’t even been a member of the Democratic Party for much of his career)”. Was Trump a “team player”? Had he ever been a member of the Republican Party for much of his career? That didn’t seem to be a problem for him.

  35. It’s so funny how desperate the brainwashed right wing establishment drones are getting. They hate it when their narrow view of how the world should be is challenged.

    How dare people point out the bias in the MSM. How dare people point out the clear establishment bias in the DNC that gifted victory to Trump. How dare they suggest that the system is broken. How dare they question the rampant inequality in society. Stop rocking the boat!

  36. Nicholas

    The “strong economy” moniker is applied by people who are out of touch with how the economy actually affects people. You can’t just look at the headline unemployment rate and conclude that the economy is strong. The headline rate does not reveal the more consequential facts for people’s lived experiences: that many of the jobs are of poor quality, that there is a massive amount of under-employment and hidden unemployment, that real wage rises are stagnant for all but a sliver of the population, while prices rise significantly for health care, education, housing, and energy.

    To think that the US economy is strong you have to be insulated from the effects of bad economy policy. This is the case for all of the centrist media pundits who keep saying that the economy is strong. Their word is not going to override voters’ lived experiences of how insecure, hard, and precarious their lives are.
    ——————————————
    You can peddle that you your heart is content but don’t be shocked if in November Trump is re-elected. I speak to Americans and they say the economy is good.

  37. Firefox
    America has many social problems and don’t get me started on their health system or gun laws but America’s economy is in good shape and if Sanders cannot show he wont hurt it then he will finish up just like Bill Shorten.

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