Call of the board: South Australia

Yet more intricate detail on the May federal election result – this time from South Australia, where normality was restored after the Nick Xenophon interruption of 2016.

Welcome to another instalment of the now nearly complete Call of the Board series, a seat-by-seat review of the result of the May federal election. Now is the turn of South Australia, previous instalments having dealt with Sydney (here and here), regional New South Wales, Melbourne, regional Victoria, south-east Queensland, regional Queensland and Western Australia.

So far as the two-party swing was concerned, South Australia was largely a microcosm of the national result, with the Coalition picking up a swing of 1.6% (compared with 1.2% nationally) and no seats changing hands. Similarly, Labor did particularly badly in the regions, suffering big swings in Barker and Grey, compared with a highly consistent pattern of small swings in the metropolitan area. Labor won the statewide two-party preferred vote, as they have done at four out of the past five elections, albeit by a modest margin of 50.7-49.3.

As in previous recent instalments, I offer the following image with colour coding of swings at booth level. Compared with other metropolitan capitals, the divide between Labor swings in inner urban areas and Liberal swings further afield is somewhat less clear here, although the Labor swings are a fairly good proxy for general affluence. This would be even more apparent if the map extended further afield to encompass the Adelaide Hills areas covered by Mayo, where, as noted below, the tide seems to be running against the Liberals, and not just in comparison with Rebekha Sharkie.

On the primary vote, comparisons with 2016 are complicated by the Nick Xenophon factor. The Nick Xenophon Team scored 21.3% statewide in 2016, but its Centre Alliance successor fielded candidates only in the non-metropolitan seats of Mayo, Barker and Grey. Rebekha Sharkie was comfortably re-elected in Mayo, but the party’s vote was slashed in Barker and Grey. Primary votes elsewhere followed similar patterns – to save myself repetition in the seat-by-seat account below, the Xenophon absence left between 16.7% and 20.0% up for grabs in Kingston, Makin, Spence and Sturt, which resulted in primary vote gains of 5.1% to 6.2% for the Liberals, 5.2% to 6.6% for Labor and 2.6% to 3.9% for the Greens.

The other factor worth noting in preliminaries is a redistribution that resulted in the abolition of a seat, part of a trend that has reduced the state’s representation from 13 to 10 since 1990. This caused Port Adelaide to be rolled into Hindmarsh, creating one safe Labor seat out of what were formerly one safe Labor and one marginal seat. The eastern parts of Port Adelaide and Hindmarsh were transferred to Adelaide, setting the seal on a seat that has grown increasingly strong for Labor since the Howard years, while the Glenelg end of Hindmarsh went to Boothby, without changing its complexion as a marginal Liberal seat.

The table below compares two-party results with corresponding totals I have derived from Senate ballot papers, the idea being that this gives some sort of idea as to how results may have been affected by candidate and incumbency factors (two-party results for Labor are shown). This shows a clear pattern of Labor doing better in the House than the Senate in the seats than they hold, whereas there is little distinction in Liberal-held seats. My guess would be that there is a general tendency for Labor to score better in the House and the Senate overall, which is boosted further by sitting member effects in Labor-held seats, while being cancelled out by those in Liberal-held seats. Taking that into account, it would seem Labor’s sitting member advantages were relatively weak in Adelaide and Hindmarsh, which stands to reason given the disturbance of the redistribution.

On with the show:

Adelaide (Labor 8.2%; 0.1% swing to Liberal): The Liberal swing in this now safe Labor seat was below the statewide par despite the disappearance of Kate Ellis’s personal vote. In this it reflected the national inner urban trend, and also the long term form of a seat that has drifted from the Liberals’ reach since Ellis gained it in 2004. However, a divide was evident between a Liberal swing at the northern end and a Labor swing in the south, for reasons not immediately obvious. It may be thought to reflect the demographic character of the respective Enfield and Unley ends of the seat, but this doesn’t explain why the Liberals gained in Prospect immediatley north of the city, an area that would seem to refect the inner urban mould. Nor was there any particularly evident effect from the redistribution, which added to the west of the electorate parts of Hindmarsh, formerly held by Adelaide’s new member, Steve Georganas. The Centre Alliance registered a relatively weak 13.7% here in 2016 – the Greens did particularly well in their absence, lifting from 10.0% to 15.7%, although they are still a long way off being competitive.

Barker (Liberal 18.9%; 5.1% swing to Liberal): The Barossa Valley swung to Labor, but the rest of this seat followed the script of regional Australia in going strongly enough to the Liberals to substantially increase Tony Pasin’s already safe margin. A majority of the Centre Alliance collapse (from 27.6% to 2.9%) ended up with the Coalition, although the United Australia Party recorded an above average 5.9%, while the Labor primary vote made a weak gain of 4.7%.

Boothby (Liberal 1.4%; 1.3% swing to Labor): Labor once again failed to realise hopes of reeling in this southern Adelaide seat, despite it reflecting the national trend of affluent suburbia in recording a 1.3% Labor swing that overwhelmed whatever sophomore advantage may have accrued to Liberal member Nicolle Flint. The absence of the Centre Alliance left 18.5% of the vote up for grabs, and the Liberal, Labor and Greens primary votes were respectively up 3.5%, 7.7% and 3.8%.

Grey (Liberal 13.3%; 5.6% swing to Liberal): Another big regional swing to the Liberals, in this case to the advantage of Rowan Ramsey, who came within 2% of losing to the Nick Xenophon Team’s Andrea Broadfoot in 2016. Broadfoot ran again for the Centre Alliance this time and was down from 27.7% to 5.1%, of which a fair bit was accounted for by the entry of One Nation and the United Australia Party, a further fair bit went to the Liberals, while the Labor primary vote hardly budged.

Hindmarsh (Labor 6.5%; 1.9% swing to Liberal): The Liberals recorded a swing perfectly in line with the statewide result in a seat that is effectively a merger of the safe Labor seat of Port Adelaide, whose member Mark Butler now takes the reins in Hindmarsh, and what was previously the highly marginal seat of Hindmarsh, which extended into more Liberal-friendly territory further to the south. The income effect took on a very particular manifestation here in that the booths along the coast swung to Labor while those further inland tended to go the other way. With the Nick Xenophon Team taking its 17.0% vote into retirement, each of the main parties made roughly comparable gains on the primary vote.

Kingston (Labor 11.9%; 1.6% swing to Liberal): For the most part, this once marginal but now safe Labor seat followed the national outer urban trend in swinging to the Liberals, though not be nearly enough to cause serious concern for Labor member Amanda Rishworth. However, separate consideration is demanded of the northern end of the electorate, which is notably more affluent, particularly in comparison with the central part around Morphett Vale. This northern end consists of two parts separated by the Happy Valley Reservoir — the coast at Hallett Cove, and Flagstaff Hill further inland, the latter gained in the redistribution. For whatever reason, the former area behaved as did the rest of the electorate, whereas the latter swung to Labor.

Makin (Labor 9.7%; 1.1% swing to Liberal): So far as the electorate in aggregate is concerned, everything just noted about Kingston equally applies to Makin, which remains secure for Labor member Tony Zappia. There was perhaps a slight tendency for the more affluent parts of the electorate (in the north-east around Golden Grove) to do better for Labor than the low income parts, but not much.

Mayo (Centre Alliance 5.1%; 2.2% swing to Centre Alliance): As the Nick Xenophon/Centre Alliance vote tanked elsewhere, Rebekha Sharkie had no trouble repeating her feat of the 2016 election, when she unseated Liberal member Jamie Briggs, and the July 2018 Section 44 by-election, when she accounted for the now twice-unsuccessful Liberal candidate, Georgina Downer. Downer trod water on the primary vote this time, but nonetheless won the primary vote as Labor recovered market share from Sharkie after a particularly poor showing at the by-election. Sharkie’s winning margin of 5.1% was slightly down on her 7.5% by-election win. The Sharkie factor obscured what may be an ongoing trend to Labor in the seat, with Downer winning the Liberal-versus-Labor vote by a very modest 2.5%. This partly reflected a 2% shift in the redistribution, but there was also a 0.7% swing to Labor that bucked the statewide trend.

Spence (Labor 14.1%; 3.0% swing to Liberal): As well as changing its name from Wakefield, the redistribution removed the rural territory that formerly leavened the Labor margin in a seat that now encompasses Adelaide’s low-rent north, up to and including Gawler. For those with a long enough memory, it more resembles the long lost seat of Bonython, a Labor stronghold through a history from 1955 to 2004, than Wakefield, which was a safe Liberal seat until Bonython’s abolition drew it into the suburbs. Consistent with the national trend of low-income and outer urban seats, Labor member Nick Champion emerged with a dent in his still considerable margin.

Sturt (Liberal 6.9%; 1.5% swing to Liberal): In the seat vacated upon Christopher Pyne’s retirement, swing results neatly reflected the distribution of income, favouring Labor at the northern end and Liberal in the south. Whatever the impact of the loss of Pyne’s personal vote, it didn’t stop Liberal debutante James Stevens scoring a primary vote majority and 1.5% two-party swing.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

498 comments on “Call of the board: South Australia”

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  1. On the other hand, it looks to me as if Labor have looked at what successful politicians are doing to win elections and are adapting their vision to suit the times.

    What successful politicians would that be? Morrison with his right-wing authoritarian agenda and policies.

    Labor – tailoring its ‘vision’ to converge with Liberal-lite.

    The times suit a party and leader who prosecute the case, authentically and unambiguously for real action on global heating, amongst other issues.

    Albanese is the wrong Labor leader at the wrong time. He does not suit the times at all.

  2. For those who may be interested in Middle East politics, especially the squabbles between the Arab Sunni Gulf Princelings, this is worth a read – and not too flattering of MBS..

    ‘ Two years ago, bloodcurdling threats were made by Saudi and Emirati state-controlled goons about what they would do to Qatar if it did not roll over like Bahrain and become a satellite of their bigger, stronger and wiser neighbours.

    They were going to dig a canal along Qatar’s land border and dump nuclear waste in it. They were going to do to the emir of Qatar what they did to Egypt’s president Mohamed Morsi, who was ousted in a military coup. They were going to turn Doha into another Rabaa Square, where 817 Egyptians were massacred.’

    https://www.middleeasteye.net/opinion/why-emirates-need-scupper-saudi-deal-qatar

  3. C@tmomma @ #330 Sunday, November 24th, 2019 – 2:53 pm

    Simon Katich @ #308 Sunday, November 24th, 2019 – 2:16 pm

    This is for the next time some idiot here says we just should ‘Stop Adani’ and selling Coal to India:

    ummmmmm…..

    Or, in other words, India can quite easily supply itself with Coal from its own coal reserves, if it chooses to, as it’s #5 on the list behind Australia at #3.

    So, we can finally all agree that we don’t need to open a new coal mine just to supply India? Can someone please let Barney know? He was real worried.

    Jeez, I’m glad we finally got this one sorted!

  4. Pegasus, you’ve extracted articles from the Murdoch tabloids and The Australian yourself when it suited you to do so. And we will critique it based upon its validity. We don’t have rigid points of view but generally the stuff directed at federal Labor by the Murdoch media is self-serving and provides aid and comfort to the Coalition.

  5. Peg

    Did you catch Albo’s speech on Friday? Apparently not, given the ill informed sniping permeating your posts. So here are some highlights for you..

    “I was raised in a council house by a single mother on an invalid pension.

    So much of what Mum did added up to one thing: her hope that my life would turn out better than hers.

    What I saw in her was what I would eventually learn was universal.

    The aspiration to lift others as we lift ourselves.

    To make life better for our families and our communities.

    To create a future you look forward to, by improving the present.

    And to do everything we can to make sure our children have opportunities and choices greater than what we had.

    https://anthonyalbanese.com.au/speech-the-economy-brisbane-friday-22-november-2019

  6. Legal experts stunned by Rudy Giuliani’s ‘totally unethical’ boast he could blackmail Trump to save himself

    In an interview with Fox New on Saturday, President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani appeared to threaten his own client, threatening that he has “insurance” against the president if he tries to throw Giuliani under the bus for his role in arranging the Ukraine bribery scheme.

    His comments drew instant outrage from attorneys and former prosecutors on social media, who pointed out that Giuliani’s threat is a massive breach of attorney ethics at best, and a federal crime at worst.

    Renato Mariotti @renato_mariotti

    What “insurance” does Giuliani have on Trump?

    It’s totally unethical for a lawyer to suggest that he has negative information about a client, or threaten to release it, but Giuliani has flaunted his professional responsibility for some time.

    Mimi Rocah @Mimirocah1

    So…. @RudyGiuliani is extorting @realDonaldTrump to make sure Trump doesn’t throw Rudy under the bus for shaking down Ukraine to get dirt for a political campaign. Got it.

    https://www.rawstory.com/2019/11/legal-experts-stunned-by-rudy-giulianis-totally-unethical-boast-he-could-blackmail-trump-to-save-himself/

  7. Pegasus, you’ve extracted articles from the Murdoch tabloids and The Australian yourself

    What a handful or two over ten years or thereabouts.

    I do not have access to paywalled articles in the Australian, Herald-Sun, etc. Occasionally, I get snippets via third sources.

    Historical revisionism and exaggeration are your shtick..

  8. The times suit a party and leader who prosecute the case, authentically and unambiguously for real action on global heating, amongst other issues.

    I agree and have felt for some time now that Di Natale therefore needs to step down in favour of someone who can lead the Greens party and make the case for action on AGW. Not the empty suited clown who leads the Greens now.

  9. And Peg, unlike your Greens dissing of the segment of our population is Queensland, Albo is reaching out and giving them hope for the future..

    “It is entirely appropriate that I’m making this address here in Queensland, a state invaluable to our national prosperity.

    Queensland has both the largest area and the highest proportion of agricultural land in the country, and some 30,000 businesses engaged in agriculture.

    It has developed a $23 billion tourism industry and 430,000 small businesses.

    Queensland is a great trading state with a mindset for getting ahead, including as the world’s largest exporter of metallurgical coal and the development of the emerging rare earths industries.

    Look right across the spectrum – resources and mining; primary industries such as beef; tourism; services; international students – and what you see is an open, outward-looking state.

    Queensland is exporting electric vehicle charging stations to Europe, energy management systems to Asia, mining services globally, as well as enhancing farming and agriculture with the use of biology, genetics and drones.

    Queensland universities and research institutes are working with commercial tourism operators to take advantage of a growing worldwide interest in unique, sustainable environmental experiences.

    In short, Queensland – like the nation – has the potential for a great future.

    And I am optimistic about Australia – as long as we get the settings right.

    I see a future that builds on our potential as a clean energy superpower.

    A future that realises our capacity to deliver the cleanest, most ethical food products to the world.

    A future based on our reserves of rare earths, the resources that will fuel this century the way that coal and iron ore fuelled the last.

    And a future that leverages our expertise, quality and skills to provide the future services in tourism, education, infrastructure, urban management and human care.

    These are the opportunities that lie before us.”

    https://anthonyalbanese.com.au/speech-the-economy-brisbane-friday-22-november-2019

  10. sprocket

    Oh no, Labor propaganda! But that’s okay, isn’t it.

    Thank you though, I have read his speech in full.

    As I have already opined…..

    One of Albanese’s shticks is, if I can aspire and succeed given my background so can you and everyone else. This is patently pap.

  11. Nath @2:21 PM. You left out “alleged”, and that’s alleged by you. The unions and Bill Shorten were chased in an $80 million witch hunt disguised as a Royal Commission which found nothing of substance, in particular nothing against Bill Shorten. Tribunals have be stacked with Liberal mates and a star chamber staffed by Liberal mates are going after building industry unions. Again nothing of substance has been found.

    I an not concerned about the matters you raise, largely because I doubt their veracity but also largely for the same reason that I am unconcerned about Police in Zambia accepting bribes from motorists caught speeding. Firstly, once again, it might not actually be happening; and if it was there are far more pressing concerns in Australia.

    Nath – if you have any evidence of crimes being committed, take it to the Police.

  12. I can see P1 is ignorant of what Albo’s plans are – with the asinine comment about ‘coal mines’, so to help you along…

    “Our immediate priorities are clear.

    One: The confusion and inaction over energy policy must end, replaced with a clear mechanism and plan that will deliver the certainty necessary to drive investment in this sector.

    A shift to a clean energy economy will achieve a triple bottom line – more jobs, lower prices, lower emissions.

    Climate change is real and it requires leadership.

    The early arrival and intensity of the current bushfire crisis should be a wake-up call for anyone who still questions the science.

    We can achieve real outcomes while benefiting jobs and the economy.

    Two: To support our future prosperity and productivity Australia needs a high speed broadband network built on more 21st century fibre.

    A network that revolutionises the delivery of essential services such as health and education, and also unlocks the growth potential of our regions.

    Labor went to the previous election with a responsible and credible plan to address near-term concerns with the NBN.

    Come 2022, the country will need a long-term plan.”

    https://anthonyalbanese.com.au/speech-the-economy-brisbane-friday-22-november-2019

  13. Gosh Sprocket,

    Albanese reaching out to Queenslanders wouldn’t be for purely political reasons would it?

    I heard the author of The Monthly article – How Good is Queensland? – interviewed the other day on the ABC….. he said wtte if Albanese and Labor are seen to be sucking up to us (ie Qld) it could backfire….time will tell.

  14. Peg, Albo’s ‘log cabin’ story may not fit your view of what the correct antecedents for a leader are. But he is the leader of the alternative government, and like it or not, the ‘log cabin’ stuff is important to some, as is the appearances on the Today Show and Studio 10.

    I get that RDN and Bandt would be seen dead on these mindless pap shows – but they don’t have to worry about getting 50+1 after preferences.

  15. sprocket_ @ #371 Sunday, November 24th, 2019 – 3:29 pm

    I can see P1 is ignorant of what Albo’s plans are – with the asinine comment about ‘coal mines’, so to help you along…

    “Our immediate priorities are clear.

    One: The confusion and inaction over energy policy must end, replaced with a clear mechanism and plan that will deliver the certainty necessary to drive investment in this sector.

    A shift to a clean energy economy will achieve a triple bottom line – more jobs, lower prices, lower emissions.

    Climate change is real and it requires leadership.

    The early arrival and intensity of the current bushfire crisis should be a wake-up call for anyone who still questions the science.

    We can achieve real outcomes while benefiting jobs and the economy.

    Two: To support our future prosperity and productivity Australia needs a high speed broadband network built on more 21st century fibre.

    A network that revolutionises the delivery of essential services such as health and education, and also unlocks the growth potential of our regions.

    Labor went to the previous election with a responsible and credible plan to address near-term concerns with the NBN.

    Come 2022, the country will need a long-term plan.”

    https://anthonyalbanese.com.au/speech-the-economy-brisbane-friday-22-november-2019

    All that talk becomes irrelevant when Fitzgibbon and the CFMMEU make their move on Albanese.

  16. If RDN had uttered th0se same lines in a speech as Albanese, the cries of “motherhood statements” would be heard 1000s of kilometres away.

  17. Peg

    Albanese reaching out to Queenslanders wouldn’t be for purely political reasons would it?

    Well, of course it is with their election looming But honestly I was impressed at his “good news” about Queensland’s potential.

  18. Oh, I see P1 and Peg are still doubting Albo’s love for the Queenslanders. Shame.

    Here is some more evidence to counter your skepticism

    “Three: We need to plan now for Australia’s future transport needs.

    It’s no good announcing an urban congestion fund over 18 months ago and literally the only expenditure has been $17 million on advertising in the lead up to the election.

    We need vision such as High Speed Rail, which would bring regional communities closer to our capital cities, and boost the case for regional business investment and decentralisation.

    This would be a natural continuation of Labor’s strong record in infrastructure.

    Indeed, when I was Infrastructure Minister we doubled investment in roads right across our nation.

    Better roads that cut travelling times and improved safety.

    We invested more in urban public transport than all previous governments from Federation through to 2007 combined.

    Including the Redcliffe Rail Link first promised in 1895, and Gold Coast Light Rail.

    And we would have funded Cross River Rail, but the Abbott Government ripped that money out.

    The provision of infrastructure must be a first order public policy priority.

    The Government has this week responded to Labor’s campaign by bringing forward some infrastructure investment – but most of it is still after the next election.

    We need is to increase investment now.

    There is also a crucial role for the private sector.

    Indeed, we will partner with the private sector, including our $2.9 trillion superannuation industry – the legacy of a Labor Government that never sat on its hands – and encourage their investment in infrastructure and technology.’

    https://anthonyalbanese.com.au/speech-the-economy-brisbane-friday-22-november-2019

  19. phoenixRed:

    Rudy is invincible.

    Rudy GiulianiVerified account@RudyGiuliani
    10h10 hours ago
    The Mafia couldn’t kill me so NO, I am not worried about the swamp press!

  20. Player 1, is your brain so small it can only parrot a single talking point?

    Herewith is Albo’s broader vision..

    “I want to lead a fiscally responsible Labor Government that invests with an eye firmly fixed on productivity.

    A Labor Government that supports wealth creation as well as its fair distribution.

    A Labor Government that supports micro-economic reform.

    We will never be content to just drift in the tide of good fortune, but we will do what Labor does best – give Australians a strong and resilient economy from which all else flows.

    Australians are pragmatic, but they are not timid.

    They will grant a Government a licence to embark on programs of progress and change – provided that Government gets the economy right first.

    The economy is the starting point.

    At the beginning of this speech, I talked about how the circumstances of your birth needn’t dictate the path of your whole life.

    That is the social mobility that is at the heart of Labor’s mission.

    Social mobility is born of opportunity.

    Opportunity needs a strong economy.

    A strong economy needs growth in productivity.

    And growth in productivity needs intelligent budgets and a progressive tax system that incentivises investment in capital and people.

    That is economic responsibility.

    That is how Labor will keep Australians from the old anchor of class and pre-determined destiny.

    Now is no time to lower our aspirations – it’s time to raise them.

    https://anthonyalbanese.com.au/speech-the-economy-brisbane-friday-22-november-2019

  21. @Pegasus

    I am inclined to believe that Albanese’s current strategy to win the next election, could backfire. In that, it will be seen by many in the electorate, as being “sitting on the fence” on the issue of the Climate Emergency.

    However, Labor could get lucky, if Australia experiences an economic crisis, like what Ireland went through, that would feature a severe recession or even depression, with the unemployment rate rising to maybe as high as 20%. In particular, if the government does not implement sufficient enough stimulus, then Labor can argue that things would have been a lot less worse if the sort of stimulus that was implemented during the Rudd government had been implemented during this economic crisis. In that sort of scenario Labor despite losing some seats to the Greens, could certainly sweep the outer metropolitan and regional city electorates.

  22. There is more of Albo’s speech I could post – all pretty good stuff IMHO.

    The fact that Peg, P1 and Rex were so quick out of the blocks to throw their negative shade is instructive IMHO

  23. sprocket,

    You are easily inspired. But thanks for the laughs.

    I look forward to you regurgitating Albanese’s speech over and and over and over and over and over and over again.

  24. Steve777
    says:
    Sunday, November 24, 2019 at 3:28 pm
    Nath @2:21 PM. You left out “alleged”, and that’s alleged by you. The unions and Bill Shorten were chased in an $80 million witch hunt disguised as a Royal Commission which found nothing of substance, in particular nothing against Bill Shorten.
    __________________________
    These were not crimes at the time because nobody had ever thought of a union actually negotiating agreements to the disadvantage of their members. It was literally unthinkable.

    One good thing about Turnbull is that he managed to stop this behaviour from happening again. It is now illegal:

    On 11 September 2017, the Fair Work Amendment (Corrupting Benefits) Act 2017 took effect. It introduced new provisions into the Fair Work Act 2009 related to:
    prohibiting giving, receiving, or soliciting corrupting benefits
    prohibiting the payment of cash or ‘in kind’ payments to relevant employee organisations
    requirements for bargaining representatives and employers about disclosing financial links or benefits they may receive from the proposed agreement

  25. Apparently, sprocket can only parrot Albanese’s speech over and over and over again with undying love and devotion.

    I am more than happy for him to do that. Let the people be the judge of how visionary and inspirational it is.

  26. I disagree with Pegasus’ evaluation of Albanese. I think he has some promise to him. The first thing he needs to do is win the election. I am unrelenting however in my criticism of bad actors in the ALP. I believe Albo is not one of them.

  27. lizzie says:
    Sunday, November 24, 2019 at 7:56 am

    Q and A

    JJ @playswithf1re
    ·
    Nov 22
    How did Frydenberg become a bank executive before he was 30?

    E P Conrad @altimetr
    He was only in the position for a year between political roles. The Banks basically “warehouse” Liberal Party apparatchiks between political gigs… You can see the quality when you look a Berejiklian’s maladministration of NSW… Only an ex- banker could be so bad.

    ————————————————
    In the corporate world job titles can be misleading so when you see someone is an executive, a vice president or director it sounds really senior and impressive until you realise that in many cases it is just a common job title held by thousands of people in that orgainsation.

  28. nath @ #392 Sunday, November 24th, 2019 – 3:50 pm

    I disagree with Pegasus’ evaluation of Albanese. I think he has some promise to him. The first thing he needs to do is win the election. I am unrelenting however in my criticism of bad actors in the ALP. I believe Albo is not one of them.

    He’d need to be more accommodating to selfie requests.

  29. sprocket_ @ #371 Sunday, November 24th, 2019 – 12:29 pm

    Labor went to the previous election with a responsible and credible plan to address near-term concerns with the NBN.

    I don’t recall Labor having a “responsible and credible” plan for the NBN in the 2019 campaign. Unless you mean …

    “Make the best of what we have’: Labor rules out sweeping NBN overhaul in new policy”

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/make-the-best-of-what-we-have-labor-rules-out-sweeping-nbn-overhaul-in-new-policy-20190408-p51bzj.html

    “Make the best of what we have” is neither responsible nor credible. It’s just putting lipstick on a pig.

  30. Fiona Katauskas
    @FionaKatauskas
    ·
    44m
    For the bajillionth time the Labor vs Greens argument proves to be the most tedious and counterproductive in Australian politics

  31. Pegasus @ #364 Sunday, November 24th, 2019 – 3:23 pm

    Pegasus, you’ve extracted articles from the Murdoch tabloids and The Australian yourself

    What a handful or two over ten years or thereabouts.

    I do not have access to paywalled articles in the Australian, Herald-Sun, etc. Occasionally, I get snippets via third sources.

    Historical revisionism and exaggeration are your shtick..

    *sigh* 🙄

    Thank goodness I have just been having a freewheeling and joyful discussion with my children as we prepared dinner instead of having to be confronted in real time with this sort of humbuggery.

  32. sprocket_
    says:
    Sunday, November 24, 2019 at 3:57 pm
    Rex, Albo was in Geelong recently – the True Believers came out in force for the selfies..
    ______________________________
    Imagine the combined number of colonoscopies endured by that group!

  33. Dan

    Perhaps if you read Albo’s actual words, rather than the spin in 9Fax..

    “Two: To support our future prosperity and productivity Australia needs a high speed broadband network built on more 21st century fibre.

    A network that revolutionises the delivery of essential services such as health and education, and also unlocks the growth potential of our regions.

    Labor went to the previous election with a responsible and credible plan to address near-term concerns with the NBN.

    Come 2022, the country will need a long-term plan.”

    https://anthonyalbanese.com.au/speech-the-economy-brisbane-friday-22-november-2019

  34. Danama Papers @ #395 Sunday, November 24th, 2019 – 3:56 pm

    sprocket_ @ #371 Sunday, November 24th, 2019 – 12:29 pm

    Labor went to the previous election with a responsible and credible plan to address near-term concerns with the NBN.

    I don’t recall Labor having a “responsible and credible” plan for the NBN in the 2019 campaign. Unless you mean …

    “Make the best of what we have’: Labor rules out sweeping NBN overhaul in new policy”

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/make-the-best-of-what-we-have-labor-rules-out-sweeping-nbn-overhaul-in-new-policy-20190408-p51bzj.html

    “Make the best of what we have” is neither responsible nor credible. It’s just putting lipstick on a pig.

    I see you’re ignoring the fact that, as recently as a couple of days ago, Anthony Albanese pledged to rectify the clusterstuffup of an NBN that the Coalition have bequeathed Australia.

    Why did you decide to do that?

  35. I can see ageist nath throwing shade on the older generation. Pathetic.

    So Albo also got to listen to many of the younger generation in Geelong…

  36. Pegasus @ #386 Sunday, November 24th, 2019 – 3:45 pm

    sprocket,

    You are easily inspired. But thanks for the laughs.

    I look forward to you regurgitating Albanese’s speech over and and over and over and over and over and over again.

    You mean like you do with every brainfart Richard Di Natale, or any other Greens MP, comes out with? Sorry, I didn’t know PB was the exclusive domain for Greens hot air.

  37. DP
    I reckon if Rudd had taken the DD route, he’d still be PM today. No evidence to support that of course, just a belief of mine.
    —————–
    I’m not so sure he would still be PM but I think Rudd’s story would be very different, I remember going to Christmas parties in 2009 and hearing both ALP and Liberals openly saying Rudd would win easily only for those same ALP people to be furious when Rudd backed out of going as they all had expected he would go in early February while the Liberals were muttering “thank god for that”

  38. sprocket_
    says:
    Sunday, November 24, 2019 at 4:03 pm
    I can see ageist nath throwing shade on the older generation. Pathetic.
    ___________________
    OK boomer.

  39. sprocket_
    says:
    Sunday, November 24, 2019 at 4:03 pm
    I can see ageist nath throwing shade on the older generation. Pathetic.
    So Albo also got to listen to many of the younger generation in Geelong…
    ________________________________
    What is it with politicians lining up people as props. It doesn’t impress me much.

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