Sins of commission

Kooyong and Chisholm legal challenge latest; by-election rumblings in Isaacs; Jim Molan strikes back; and the Victorian Liberals gearing up already for federal preselections.

Possible (or possibly not) federal by-election news:

• The Australian Electoral Commission has petitioned the Federal Court to reject challenges against the federal election results in Chisholm and Kooyong. The challenges relate to Chinese-language Liberal Party signage that appeared to mimic the AEC’s branding, and advised voters that giving a first preference to the Liberal candidates was “the correct voting method”. As reported by The Guardian, the AEC argues that “the petition fails to set out at all, let alone with sufficient particularity, any facts or matters on the basis of which it might be concluded that it was likely that on polling day, electors able to read Chinese characters, upon seeing and reading the corflute, cast their vote in a manner different from what they had previously intended”. This seems rather puzzling to my mind, unless it should be taken to mean that no individuals have been identified who are ready to confirm that they were indeed so deceived. Academic electoral law expert Graeme Orr argued on Twitter that the AEC had “no need to intervene on the substance of a case where partisan litigants are well represented”.

• Talk of a by-election elsewhere in Melbourne was stimulated by Monday’s column ($) from acerbic Financial Review columnist Joe Aston, which related “positively feverish speculation” that Labor’s Shadow Attorney-General, Mark Dreyfus, would shortly quit his Melbourne bayside seat of Isaacs with an eye to a position on Victoria’s Court of Appeal. Aston further reported that Dreyfus hoped to be succeeded by Fiona McLeod, the prominent barrister who gained a 6.1% swing as Labor’s candidate for Higgins in May. Dreyfus emphatically rejected such “ridiculous suggestions” in late August, saying he was “absolutely committed to serving out this term of parliament”, and again took to Twitter on Monday to say he would be “staying and fighting the next election”. Aston remains unconvinced, writing in Tuesday’s column ($) that the suggestions derived from “high-level discussions Dreyfus has held on Spring Street with everyone from Premier Daniel Andrews, former Attorney-General Martin Pakula, his successor Jill Hennessy and his caucus colleagues”, along with his “indiscreet utterances around the traps”.

Federal preselection news:

• Jim Molan has won the endorsement of both Scott Morrison and the conservative faction of the New South Wales Liberal Party to fill the Senate vacancy created by Arthur Sinodinos’s departure to become ambassador to the United States. However, the Sydney Morning Herald reports this is not dissuading rival nominee Richard Shields, former deputy state party director and Insurance Council of Australia manager, and the runner-up to Dave Sharma in last year’s keenly fought Wentworth preselection. Shields’ backers are said to include Helen Coonan, former Senator and Howard government minister, and Mark Neeham, a former state party director. Earlier reports suggested the moderate faction had been reconciled to Molan’s ascendancy by a pledge that he would only serve out the remainder of Sinodinos’s two-year term, and would not seek re-election in 2022.

Rob Harris of The Age reports the Victorian Liberals are considering a plan to complete their preselections for the 2022 election much earlier than usual – and especially soon for Liberal-held seats. The idea in the latter case is for challengers to incumbents to declare their hands by January 15, with the matter to be wrapped up by late February or early March. This comes after the party’s administrative committee warded off threats to members ahead of the last election, most notably factional conservative Kevin Andrews in Menzies, by rubber-stamping the preselections of all incumbents, much to the displeasure of party members. Other preselections are to be held from April through to October. Also proposed is a toughening of candidate vetting procedures, after no fewer than seven candidates in Labor-held seats were disendorsed during the period of the campaign.

Self-promotion corner:

• I had a paywalled piece in Crikey yesterday which noted the stances adopted of late by James McGrath, ideological warror extraordinaire and scourge of the cockatoo, in his capacity as chair of the Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters, which is presently conducting its broad-ranging inquiry into the May federal election. These include the end of proportional representation in the Senate, the notion that parliamentarians who quit their parties should be required to forfeit their seats, and — more plausibly — the need to curtail pre-poll voting.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,820 comments on “Sins of commission”

  1. lizzie, really? DO you mean when they are used as ‘architectural’ plants?
    Friends have a patch of kangaroo grass. Thick. About 2×10 m. When the wind blows through them it is delightful in vision and sound.

    Up at Mount Barker there is a place where several aboriginal tribes used to meet. Special place even now but when the first white man rode into the area he commented that the grasses were hard for his horses to walk through so thick and high they were. In January!

    These days, after being trashed, there is barely a stubble of imported grass through the dust.

  2. #TrumpGenocide trends on Twitter after Trump green-lights ethnic cleansing of the Kurds

    President Donald Trump on Wednesday said that he wanted the expected ethnic cleansing of Kurds by Turkey to be done in a “humane way.”

    And he was mocked on Twitter and on MSNBC after arguing that Kurds aren’t that strong of allies because they did not storm the beaches of Normandy during World War II.

    With worries that Trump had green-lighted ethnic cleansing, he was accused of genocide on Twitter with the hashtag #TrumpGenocide.

    https://www.rawstory.com/2019/10/trumpgenocide-trends-on-twitter-after-trump-green-lights-ethnic-cleansing-of-the-kurds/

  3. A Climate Party would just cannibalise other efforts. Even the Greens are ultimately just a pressure group.

    The only hope is for the Left of the ALP to defeat and purge the Right of the ALP. Labor’s Left needs to aspire to power and control of the Party, instead of the permanent sub-dom arrangement they have now. The problem is that anybody in the Left who’s not a professional submissive has already given up.

  4. Special forces soldier tells Fox News reporter he’s ‘ashamed’ to carry out Trump’s order on the Kurds

    A special forces soldier spoke to Fox News national security correspondent Jennifer Griffin and confessed they were “ashamed.”

    “I just spoke to a distraught US Special Forces soldier who is among the 1000 or so US troops in Syria tonight who is serving alongside the SDF Kurdish forces,” Griffin tweeted Wednesday evening.

    “I am ashamed for the first time in my career,” the soldier told her. “Turkey is not doing what it agreed to. It’s horrible.”

    According to Griffin, this soldier has helped train local forces on the ground in multiple continents. Tonight, he is on the ground “witnessing Turkish atrocities.”

    https://www.rawstory.com/2019/10/special-forces-soldier-tells-fox-news-reporter-hes-ashamed-to-carry-out-trumps-order-on-the-kurds/

  5. And I’m in Amsterdam, and you’re not. It’s a very special place. Apart from some creeping franchise ice cream rubbish and the like in the main tourist strips, not very offensive, it’s otherwise as wonderful as ever, clean, and works so well within itself. It’s very musical, tram clangs, and church bells. Bicycles everywhere of course, on the phone, carrying umbrellas, children and dogs in boxes, lives on the move. It’s coolish, overcast with soft diffused light, and light rain gives it all a sheen and a sparkle. The night lighting along the canals is magic fairy land stuff. There was a woman at last night’s concert with a seeing-eye dog, asleep by her side throughout Beethoven’s last three sonatas. Drinks are free at any of the gorgeous bars, before and during the performance.

  6. Watermelon,

    Every political party is a pressure group, or began as one. Labor is a pressure group for workers, the Liberals are a pressure group for employers and the wealthy, the Nationals are a pressure group for farmers. Theoretically, at least.

  7. So, the Oz public and electorate are just pining for Labor to swing to the left?
    I doubt it.
    When a “mildly reformist” Opposition (as Shorten’s pitch was designated at the time) can be defeated by the LNP, those who were stupid enough fall for Palmer’s $$$$- filled pitch and those who think PH is some kind of saviour of “Real Australia”, more radical, potentially costly and seemingly threatening policies, are hardly the way to go.
    As an article in Crikey today suggests, a dispirited and deflated Labor party – with little idea as yet as to what to do and where to go, could mean a decade more of dead-handed conservatism.
    Trouble is, the Oz electorate seems to accept that LNP -regardless – are safer than Labor. That is the pity of it all……………I think those on the thinking side of politics have quite a long and rough road ahead…………….
    The incessant bickering between the Greens and Labor will likely ensure, just as the Labour split with the DLP did years ago, a long sojourn in opposition is on the cards………..depressing ain’t it?

  8. Watermelon says:
    Thursday, October 10, 2019 at 10:46 am

    A Climate Party would just cannibalise other efforts.

    Depending on how a Climate Party positioned itself, it may gain pref support from other Parties and be able to win Senate seats and maybe influence the positions of the LNP.

    The success of Zali Steggall suggests there is a constituency – a large one – on the Centre-Right that will vote for climate change if they do not have to vote Green or Labor to achieve it. Such a Party could split the Right. This would be a very welcome development.

    The Greens like to position themselves as the one-true-voice on Climate Change. This is self-evidently false. I think there’s a very large constituency in the centre of Australian politics who will give political support to a Climate Party that presents itself with their values in mind.

  9. Monbiot on the why and how of protests. This is not an extinction event, it’s a (self) extermination event.

    A dilemma action is one that puts the authorities in an awkward position. Either the police allow civil disobedience to continue, thereby encouraging more people to join, or they attack the protesters, creating a powerful “symbolism of fearless sacrifice”, thereby encouraging more people to join. If you get it right, the authorities can’t win.

    Among the crucial common elements, he found, are assembling thousands of people in the centre of the capital city, maintaining a strictly nonviolent discipline, focusing on the government and continuing for days or weeks at a time. Radical change, his research reveals, “is primarily a numbers game. Ten thousand people breaking the law has historically had more impact than small-scale, high-risk activism.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/oct/09/polluters-climate-crisis-fossil-fuel

  10. Simon Katich

    For some time, all the ‘posh’ landscape gardeners seem to have been planting, saw-sedges and phormiums and dianella for a quick effect.

  11. Desperate Pence Tries To Save Himself By Throwing Trump Under The Bus On Ukraine

    Vice President Mike Pence seemingly sought to put distance between himself and the president on Wednesday by claiming that he – unlike his boss – did not personally talk with Ukraine about getting dirt on Joe Biden.

    In remarks to reporters in Iowa, Pence said, “I never discussed the issue of the Bidens with President Zelensky.”

    He added, “The issue of aid and our efforts with regard to Ukraine were, from my experience, in no way connected to” any talk of investigating the Bidens.

    The vice president is basically saying that, sure, Trump may have tried to extort a foreign power, but he had nothing to do with it.

    https://www.politicususa.com/2019/10/09/desperate-pence-tries-to-save-himself-by-throwing-trump-under-the-bus-on-ukraine.html

  12. Tricot

    “Trouble is, the Oz electorate seems to accept that LNP -regardless – are safer than Labor. ”

    …a fortnight ago, Labor’s Shadow Treasurer Jim Chalmers gave a fine “Light on the Hill” speech in Bathurst. He spoke directly to the need for Labor to reassert its economic credentials, of the threat of economic insecurity to individuals, families and the economy at large, and of the need to be fiscally responsible.

    For his troubles some Laborites assailed his speech as a “shift to the Right”, as a capitulation to “neo-liberalism”, and a “Liberal-lite” form of politics.

    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/labor-has-yet-to-learn-the-hard-lessons-of-defeat-20191009-p52z5e.html

  13. For some time, all the ‘posh’ landscape gardeners seem to have been planting, saw-sedges and phormiums and dianella for a quick effect.

    Yeah. Yuk.
    A place down near Yankalilla….. two types of native grasses in the foreground…..

  14. There are three types of climate change denier, and most of us are at least one explain two academics in The Conversation.
    https://theconversation.com/there-are-three-types-of-climate-change-denier-and-most-of-us-are-at-least-one-124574

    This article makes a lot of sense. You very rarely meet the first type of denier these days (i.e. those who flat-out deny the science – usually when you scratch this type of denier, you uncover a financial interest), and the second type is becoming rarer as well (i.e. those who try to misrepresent what the science is telling us – this position gets harder and harder to maintain as the science becomes clearer and clearer, so this group eventually has to jump one way or the other).

    But you certainly meet a lot of the third type (i.e. those who claim to accept the science, but then deny responsibility – they rationalize to themselves that they don’t need to actually do anything about it).

    These are just two examples of common strategies we use to deny our own responsibility and culpability. They make us feel better about what little we actually do, or congratulate us for accepting the science. But they are ultimately self-defeating delusions. Instead of congratulating ourselves on agreeing with the basic scientific facts of climate change, we need to push ourselves to action.

    This is particularly true in Australia, of course, where our per-capita emissions are amongst the highest in the world.

    Some people – even some right here on PB – seem to believe the answer is to stop talking about the issue.

    But of course the answer is exactly the opposite.

  15. lizzie, the thing about slightly messy and thick yards like the one in the picture is it is great habitat for lots of things. Birds love it. Lizards. Insects.

    Todays ultra neat and ordered landscaping is sterile to me.

    Most good landscape architects get this concept. But so many peeps want order and neat and what they consider ‘low maintenance’.

  16. Itza…..the observation that ‘tens of thousands’ have more impact than ‘a few’ is hardly earth-shatteringly new.

    The powerless, by definition, have nothing going for them but their numbers. The project always has to be to maximise the numbers, to concentrate them, to multiply them. Sadly for the environment, XR seem very unlikely to do those things. They will simply amplify their powerlessness.

  17. Tricot,

    The ALP/DLP split was different to the current Labor/Greens situation in a couple of key respects.

    The DLP’s rise was rapid and short-lived (about 20 years from their first senator to being wiped out). The Greens’ rise has been slow and their presence looks likely to continue for some time, having already exceeded twenty years.

    Even at the DLP’s highest point, the ALP’s vote was miles above where it is now.

    It wasn’t just bickering. The DLP directed preferences against the ALP in a deliberate effort to keep Labor out of power.

    Okay, that’s three key respects.

  18. zoomster says:
    Thursday, October 10, 2019 at 11:15 am

    There were several climate parties running for the Senate. Not one of them scored a Senate spot.

    There was a team called Independents for Climate Action…or something like that. I don’t recall a Climate Party as such, though the issue featured in the policy lists of several minor parties trading under various names…

  19. Watermelon @ #104 Thursday, October 10th, 2019 – 10:46 am

    The only hope is for the Left of the ALP to defeat and purge the Right of the ALP.

    This is not going to happen. The events of yesterday demonstrated that in spades. Even when the Left gains ascendancy, everyone knows it is only temporary. Labor had to speak with one voice. The punters will not vote for a divided party. If Labor wants to be taken seriously, people like Joel Fitzgibbon need to be jettisoned. He should certainly be immediately removed from the front bench. How likely do you think it is that anything will happen to him?

  20. Player One:

    [‘Some people…seem to believe the answer is to stop talking about the issue.’]

    From my perspective, it’s not that. It’s the repetitiveness of the argument that’s grueling, in the same manner as Labor/Green hostilities.

  21. The only hope is for the Left of the ALP to defeat and purge the Right of the ALP.

    Wont that narrow the base further?
    The LNP seem to do OK with a motley crew of nutters, agrarian socialists, nationalists, religious fundies, moderates, liberals, conservatives, numpties and toadies. One ring that binds them is keeping hold of power (by beating the dreaded lefties).

  22. Zali Steggal is what you get when the Liberals run a famously boorish troglodyte in a posh electorate, and even then it took a huge concentrated effort by outside forces and an incredibly rare caliber of candidate. I don’t think her example can be generalised very far.

  23. I’d like to see a climate party.

    Maybe Climate, Sustainability and Environment party. Turnbull, Garrett and Flannery with Grog as economics spokesperson.

    Greens are now no different to Labor, libs, Hanson and Palmer, cynical opportunists with headline gimmicks.

    We need a decent respectible 3rd voice like the democrats once were.

  24. SK,

    You have nailed the great handicap of the Coalition’s enemies.

    If your only goal is power for its own sake, you can join with others of like mind and present a united front with no remorse.

    But a True Believer with a passion for a cause will always find it hard to compromise with those of equal passion but slightly different mind, thus creating an easily-exploited impression of disunity.

  25. Some people – even some right here on PB – seem to believe the answer is to stop talking about the issue.

    But of course the answer is exactly the opposite.

    Not always true. There are other many issues that warrant discussion.

    Saying that your pet issue (whatever it may be) is the only one worth discussing looks like fanaticism, and will lose you your audience quicker than you can say “Global Warming”.

    Telling someone that the only solution to their unemployment is to close down their industry, start up another, and during the 20 years in the meantime work as a tourist guide in a national park is guaranteed to empty the town hall in seconds.

  26. Zali Steggal is what you get when the Liberals run a famously boorish troglodyte in a posh electorate, and even then it took a huge concentrated effort by outside forces and an incredibly rare caliber of candidate. I don’t think her example can be generalised very far.

    She won 57-43.
    ALP-LNP was 48-52. A 9pt swing.

  27. AM……….well I realise by using the DLP, the historical context was quite different, but by my observation the outcome was/is the same. For 23 years or so, Labour was out of office. It should have won the 1969 election and that loss was akin to Shorten’s just recently – not the expected outcome – as those who look at the bitter/sweet memories of ‘Don’s Party’… Another difference, I suppose, is that the momentum was with Gough and Labour so by 1972 the need for change was overwhelming coupled with the disintegration of the LNP at the time. Things are much more bleak for Labor now.

  28. I don’t think Scott Morrison is turning his back on Australians, anyway those Australians who are either his supporters or respect them.

    Morrison in my opinion is giving the base as much ‘red meat’ as possible, in a much more measured, disciplined way than Donald Trump has displayed. Which links in with his remarks when he first become Prime Minister ‘We are on your side’, obviously he meant that for those hard right wingers, who did not think Malcolm Turnbull on their side.

  29. By 1972, sentiment against the Vietnam War and especially conscription came to a head. Gough Whitlam didn’t commit to holding a review to examine the feasibility of transitioning our troops out if it were economically and militarily viable to do so. He said he would end Australia’s involvement, full bloody stop (not his exact words).

    I think there’s a lesson there, but maybe it’s just me.

  30. Jennifer Griffin @JenGriffinFNC
    ·
    2h
    This US Special Forces soldier wanted me to know: “The Kurds are sticking by us. No other partner I have ever dealt with would stand by us.”
    Disappointed in the decisions coming from their senior leaders.
    ·
    Acc to this US soldier on the ground tonight in Syria: “The Kurds are as close to Western thinking in the Middle East as anyone. “It’s a shame. It’s horrible.” “This is not helping the ISIS fight.” Re: ISIS prisoners: “Many of them will be free in the coming days and weeks.”

    Troops on the ground in Syria and their commanders were “surprised” by the decision Sunday night.
    Of the President’s decision: “He doesn’t understand the problem. He doesn’t understand the repercussions of this. Erdogan is an Islamist, not a level headed actor.”

  31. The prime minister has announced the host of TV renovation show The Block will be Australia’s first national careers ambassador.

    Sheez! I didn’t realise we had another highly paid Ambassador to match the Envoy.
    Might as well have Tony Abbott in charge with his lords and ladies.

  32. Boris @ #129 Thursday, October 10th, 2019 – 11:41 am

    I’d like to see a climate party.

    Maybe Climate, Sustainability and Environment party. Turnbull, Garrett and Flannery with Grog as economics spokesperson.

    Greens are now no different to Labor, libs, Hanson and Palmer, cynical opportunists with headline gimmicks.

    We need a decent respectible 3rd voice like the democrats once were.

    There is this mob – https://www.sustainableaustralia.org.au/

    While they are not a single issue party, they are at least in the correct domain. Also, because they are not pretending to be a “party of government” they don’t have to carry all the baggage that the Greens do.

    I’ll have to read their policies in more detail, but perhaps it would be a good idea to start with a party that exists, and try and sharpen their focus on Climate.

    BTW – at the last election (their first, I think) they won no seats – but they got almost as many votes as the FFS party:

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/elections/federal/2019/results/party-totals

  33. Wont that narrow the base further?

    That’s the conventional wisdom that made the Democrats pray for a Trump candidacy because he’d be so easy to beat. It’s not the 1990s anymore. Times have changed. Bowen’s pathetic efforts to try and woo the editors of the rightwing press with the size of his budget surplus are nothing but voter repellent. Ged Kearney gave a speech the other day putting forward a vision with moral clarity and conviction. Of course she’ll never be made leader because Labor Right will always enforce Capital’s veto over the party.

  34. More from Scaramucci

    Anthony Scaramucci
    @Scaramucci
    ·
    8m
    These are war crimes for
    @realDonaldTrump
    to pay his debts and bills.
    Quote Tweet

    Mustafa Bali
    @mustefabali
    · 11h
    Turkish warplanes have started to carry out airstrikes on civilian areas. There is a huge panic among people of the region.
    Anthony Scaramucci
    @Scaramucci
    ·
    53m
    He is finished. He wants to wreak more havoc though before he leaves.
    @realDonaldTrump
    has bills to pay.
    Quote Tweet

    Joe Scarborough
    @JoeNBC
    · 1h
    According to @FoxNews, over half of American voters want Trump removed from office. His erratic policy and insane pronouncements re: ISIS, Syria, and the Kurds only underline the fact that every Republican senator knows: Donald Trump is not fit for office. https://foxnews.com/politics/fox-n

  35. The ever increasing authoritarian Dutton’s calling for $40,000 fines imposed on XR activists. He’d be really pissed with Ludlam’s bail conditions being thrown out.

  36. What about the Sex/Reason party? Could never work out how they could have such a marketable name yet only manage to get such a small shred of the vote.

  37. @Player One

    The problem I have with Sustainable Australia, is that they are farming the immigration debate, about the numbers of immigrants Australia should let in every-year. Despite they have the best of intentions, it encourages racists unfortunately, who just object to the immigrants who are from what they see as the coming from what they see as undesirable ethnic groups.

    Instead the immigration debate needs to be framed, about making the immigration program fairer. Especially given there are a lot of policies which pander to racists (like mandatory detention of asylum seekers) and provides the business class with a massive amount of cheap, easily exploitable labour through temporary work visa categories.

    The immigration reforms that I believe need to be introduced, in are abolishing mandatory detention of asylum seekers, increasing the refugee intake quota, abolishing temporary work visa categories, allowing any migrant access to Centrelink benefits and Medicare (especially if they pay taxes). It would be consequential if the annual migrant intake was reduced quite considerably due to these reforms.

  38. A Betrayal Too Far

    Nothing captures the moral and geopolitical bankruptcy of Donald Trump’s Hobbesian worldview better than his rank betrayal of the Kurds.

    Once more, Turkey’s President Erdogan—a knave, but not a fool—demonstrated his hypnotic powers over an American president who is both. Without warning, the White House approved Turkey’s plan to invade territory in northern Syria held by the Kurds, America’s one indispensable ally on the ground in the fight against ISIS. The administration’s announcement of betrayal was bald and explicit: Turkey will soon be moving forward with its long-planned operation into Northern Syria. The United States Armed Forces . . . having defeated the ISIS territorial ‘Caliphate,’ will no longer be in the immediate area.”

    The greatest tragedy, however, is how deeply Trump has invested American foreign policy with the solipsistic inhumanity of a leader who cares for nothing and no one but himself.

    Not his country. Nor its allies. Nor the thousands of human beings who stand to be slaughtered by the Turks and, in time, by ISIS.

    God help America—and the world that Trump, acting in our name, is abandoning to its most malignant actors.

    MORE : https://thebulwark.com/a-betrayal-too-far/

  39. Bushfire Bill @ #131 Thursday, October 10th, 2019 – 11:45 am

    Saying that your pet issue (whatever it may be) is the only one worth discussing looks like fanaticism, and will lose you your audience quicker than you can say “Global Warming”.

    Probably just as well nobody says that, then isn’t it?

    Telling someone that the only solution to their unemployment is to close down their industry, start up another, and during the 20 years in the meantime work as a tourist guide in a national park is guaranteed to empty the town hall in seconds.

    Telling someone their industry has a future when it clearly doesn’t is somehow “better”?

    But in any case, you don’t say either of those things, because neither one is actually true. Some coal mining has a future, just not a very lucrative one.

    So instead, you put a plan in place for a meaningful transition – a plan that addresses the short, medium and long term – and includes compensation (not all of it monetary). Labor has at least tried to do this in Victoria (I’m not sure about Qld or WA).

    The problem, of course, is that few people believe them – at least partly because not all of Labor believe it themselves.

  40. Thanks player one.
    Will check them out.
    I’m getting to the age and stage where I will have spare time to get more involved.

    Every bit counts and I see that they have one mp which is a start.

  41. Tristo @ #144 Thursday, October 10th, 2019 – 12:14 pm

    The problem I have with Sustainable Australia, is that they are farming the immigration debate, about the numbers of immigrants Australia should let in every-year.

    I don’t understand the “farming” bit. Did you mean “framing”?

    The problem here is that it not really possible to discuss climate policy separate from population policy. Just think back on the number of times you have heard Angus Taylor talk about how our “per capita emissions” are falling when the reality is that our total emissions are rising. This is happening because we are importing people at an unprecedented rate. We are, in fact, trading in people for short-term economic gain. This in turn will make it even more difficult for us to reduce our emissions.

    I understand your point about racism, but a party that tried to focus on climate without mentioning population would have to have very impractical policies. The Greens have this problem.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *