NSW Senate entrails examined

A close look at the New South Wales Senate result as finalised yesterday, plus Essential Research findings on attitudes to nuclear power.

Essential Research is continuing to provide The Guardian with polling on a fortnightly basis, but is still limiting itself to issue polling in the wake of the great debacle of last month. This week’s poll is concerned with nuclear power, after a push by Queensland MPs James McGrath and Keith Pitt for a parliamentary inquiry into lifting Australia’s nuclear power ban (showing rather unfortunate timing, in view of the runaway success of HBO’s television series Chernobyl). The poll finds a slight majority of 44% to 40% in favour of Australia having nuclear power plants, compared with a 40-40 tie when Essential last posed the question in 2015 – the kicker being that only 28% said they would be comfortable living near one, with 60% disagreeing. Among the other findings, 47% per cent rated that nuclear would be better than coal-fired power for the environment.

In election counting news, the button was pressed yesterday on the New South Wales Senate result, which, foreseeably, produced three seats for the Coalition (Liberals Hollie Hughes and Andrew Bragg, and Perin Davey of the Nationals), two for Labor (Tony Sheldon and Tim Ayres) and one for the Greens (Mehreen Faruqi). Above-the-line votes accounted for 93.1% of the total, which included more than two quotas each for the Coalition and Labor (albeit just barely in the latter case). This meant the top two candidates on the Coalition and Labor tickets were elected immediately, leaving two seats to be determined by the remainder of the preference distribution. The chart below shows how this proceeded as the last eight candidates were excluded, and also shows how the main candidates were placed after the surpluses of the first four elected candidates were distributed (Count 4).

Under the old system, the entirety of the vote was effectively divided between the sixth elected candidates and the unelected seventh, who was left with what is known as the “wastage quotas”. Now that it’s possible for votes to exhaust, it becomes possible for the count to fail to deliver quotas to six candidates, in which case the final seats go to whoever comes nearest at the final count. Such was the case with the last two seats in New South Wales – 0.39 quotas exhausted, and the final three quotas were distributed between three candidates in such a way as to leave all of them short of a full quota. Two of these candidates, Davey of the Nationals and Faruqi of the Greens, finished just short with 0.97 and 0.96 quotas respectively, causing them each to be elected well ahead of Kate McCulloch of One Nation on 0.68.

The chart illustrates exactly how far Jim Molan, shown in blue, fell short of winning the third seat through the strength of his below-the-line support, notwithstanding conservative excitement that he achieved the highest below-the-line vote in Senate history – in terms of aggregate votes, which is naturally a significant qualification when considering a result from New South Wales. Molan’s total share of the first preference vote was 2.92%, some distance behind a number of recent results in Tasmania, where the rate of below-the-line voting is particularly high. His exclusion unlocked a flood of preferences to Davey that closed the gap between her and Faruqi, who were all but level for the remainder of the count.

However, a good many of Molan’s preferences flowed out of the Coalition ticket and further to the right, with 20% going to McCulloch compared with 71.5% for other Coalition candidates. McCulloch also received a strong flow of preferences when Shooters Fishers and Farmers were the last party excluded two counts later. However, this was well short of what she needed to put her in the hunt for the last two seats, for which her share of the total vote would have had to have been about 2% higher. For more details on preferences, Ross Leedham has determined four-party preferred preference flows along the same lines as I provided in yesterday’s post on the Tasmanian result, observing how small party preferences split between the Coalition, Labor, the Greens, One Nation and exhaustion.

To get a sense of how the result might have played out under the old system, I’ve had a play with Antony Green’s Senate calculator from 2013, using the results from this election where possible and judiciously allocating the residue from new parties to old ones. This suggests One Nation would have won the fifth seat at the expense of either the Coalition and the Greens, who would have been in a very tight race for the last seat. One Nation preference feeders would have included not only Shooters and Fishers, Liberal Democrats, Christian Democrats, the Democratic Labour Party and Australian Conservatives (nee Family First), but also leftist concerns such as Animal Justice, thanks to Glenn Druery-inspired preference networks that had nearly every micro-party preferencing each other ahead of the main three.

The button will apparently be pressed on the Western Australian result this morning and Victoria tomorrow, both of which will assuredly produce results of three Liberal, two Labor and one Greens. Not sure when Queensland and South Australia will be done.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

442 comments on “NSW Senate entrails examined”

  1. It is possible to deal with ‘problems’ such as Setka and avoid telling the kind of people that usually vote for you that they’re not welcome in the Labor party.

    No one said that. Sally McManus and Michelle O’Neill realise what the future of unions needs to be and they have also said that Setka needs to go. I don’t think you can accuse them of alienating the people that Labor needs to feel as if they have their back. Nor does the Labor Party feel that way.

    What the Labor Party does feel that it needs to do is to represent itself to more people in the electorate so that it can stitch together a pathway to victory at the next or a subsequent election. Supporting Setka is not the way to get there.

  2. I wonder why some people continue to champion nuclear.

    Canavan is doing it to feed the chooks to stop them noticing he is wearing a tutu.

    I ponder the idea because in the small scale it has potential – especially if transport goes grid powered.

  3. Bucephalus says:

    Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 11:33 am
    “If you believe that CO2 is driving catastrophic climate change then you are a hypocrite if you oppose Nuclear Power.”
    —————————————

    That horse has bolted (pun intended).

  4. Michael A says:
    Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 11:54 am
    Labor needs a message for people who think: “it’s not fair so many have so little when some have so much, but the best form of help is a better paid, more secure job. And unions, red tape and taxes stop businesses investing as much in their workers as they otherwise could.”

    I speak to a lot of hard-up people who surprise me by saying they don’t vote Labor. When they’re willing to discuss this, it is mainly because they see Labor as tending to favour any cause except that of a business owner. And they don’t see business owners as a privileged class enemy always out to exploit workers for a profit, but as supporters of those workers through the wages they pay.

    The unions are not always heroes to these people: they are often seen as having been worthwhile in the past, but sometimes overly hostile to businesses now. Labor needs to be mature and balanced in its relationship with unions, and at arm’s length from them, or they won’t be trusted by enough voters to manage the economy.

    This is a distillation of Lib ideology. It is a completely false account of life in a broken labour market, a repressed economy and a dysfunctional political order. But enough people buy it to keep the Liberals in power. Labor have no really coherent pitch on the economy. They need one.

  5. The voters of Pearce, Hasluck, Swan and Canning who swung to the Liberals do not live in mansions. They are the work-short, income-short, debt-loaded working people of the outer suburbs.

  6. Labor has a powerful message to sell as the party of transformation. They can rightly claim to be the only party that can transform Australia’s faltering, fossil-fuelled, inequality and ignorance-based economy into a modern, renewable, progressive, equitable knowledge-based economy … with a guarantee that no Australian need be worse off in the process. Not even the multi-billionaires. This is not rocket science.

    Why they are not already doing this is just a mystery 🙁

  7. C@

    ‘No one said that..’

    You don’t need to say something to have people hear it!

    ‘Sally McManus and Michelle O’Neill realise what the future of unions needs to be and they have also said that Setka needs to go. ‘

    Yes, I get back to: Albo has handled this poorly. That’s exactly my point – the issue of Setka could be dealt with differently. (I repeat: I’m not discussing whether Setka should go or not, but the way it’s been handled).

    ‘Supporting Setka is not the way to get there.’

    Again, if you’re reading my posts as supporting Setka, you’re not understanding what I’m writing about.

  8. Had a nice example of NIMBYism when a proposal to build nuclear plants was floated under the Howard government – Sophie Mirabella arguing they were a good idea but not if one was to be built in Indi!

  9. News in the Guardian about one of those ‘brown reffos’ on the Tampa that the The Rodent scared Australia with.

    One of the asylum seekers the Norwegian cargo ship Tampa rescued in 2001 has won a prestigious Fulbright scholarship to undertake postgraduate studies in the US.

    Abbas Nazari was seven years old…………..Ultimately it was New Zealand which gave Nazari’s family a chance to start a new life.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jun/18/tampa-refugee-taken-in-by-new-zealand-wins-fulbright-scholarship

  10. Player One says:
    Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 12:05 pm
    Labor has a powerful message to sell as the party of transformation. They can rightly claim to be the only party that can transform Australia’s faltering, fossil-fuelled, inequality and ignorance-based economy into a modern, renewable, progressive, equitable knowledge-based economy … with a guarantee that no Australian need be worse off in the process. Not even the multi-billionaires. This is not rocket science.

    Why they are not already doing this is just a mystery

    Labor try. But voters are alienated from politics. They don’t trust the system or those who occupy it. They do not listen to the messages. Rather, they intentionally tune out.

    It’s far more difficult to execute than rocket science. Labor have lost 4 elections on the trot trying to pitch for change. They are further behind now in terms of PV than at any time since the Great War.

    Nearly everything that happens in politics furthers alienation and disaffection. This is not going to get better.

  11. briefly says:
    Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 12:03 pm

    I was so proud of Western Australians to see past the viscous tactics employed against the LNP Candidates and rolling out of the Pusser Lawyer McGowan to swing nicely against the ALP and to the LNP.

  12. briefly
    says:
    Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 12:03 pm
    The voters of Pearce, Hasluck, Swan and Canning who swung to the Liberals do not live in mansions. They are the work-short, income-short, debt-loaded working people of the outer suburbs.
    _____________________________
    I’d reckon there were plenty of big 4 bedroom multiple living room houses in those electorates. Certainly don’t look like slums to me. Any resentment you are feeling is probably related to the crash in Perth house prices. I bet they were feeling pretty good before that.

  13. The time lag in getting a nuclear power station up in AUstralia is only partly due to construction. The other issue is the regulatory framework required, siting options and how to fit it into the grid.

    The UK, US and Canada have been working on this for years wrt SMRs (Small modular reactors). Canada released a roadmap for their rollout in 2016.

    As SMR companies are claiming they will be able to build these in a factory and ship them to the site, the actuall build time is far less than was envisaged for the large traditional reactors.

    At the very least, we need to do the prep work for these reactors. If they work as claimed (which all indications are they will) then we will be ready to include them if we need to and decide to do so.

    I do not have shares in them. But I am thinking about it.

  14. Player One:

    “Australia’s faltering, fossil-fuelled, inequality and ignorance-based economy into a modern, renewable, progressive, equitable knowledge-based economy … with a guarantee that no Australian need be worse off in the process.”

    Please do keep rolling out that guff – how many elections have you lost/not won using that bollocks? I’m counting four in a row.

    Just explain to us again how much the ALP renewables target and 50% EV share of new car sales wasn’t going to cost us, again?

  15. poroti says:
    Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 12:16 pm
    News in the Guardian about one of those ‘brown reffos’ on the Tampa that the The Rodent scared Australia with.

    This story is great. But for the ignorant, it reads as an indictment of their selfish, cowardly stupidity. They would rather drive away every other asylum seeker simply so their stupidity will go unchallenged in the future. Ignorance is a self-reinforcing mechanism. If it were not, it would have perished long ago.

  16. You guys demand policy and vision and yet when it is presented it’s all too hard and too long and can’t be done.

    Nuclear could be done – just needs leadership to drive it.

  17. nath
    I agree, as P1 says that horse has bolted. I’m all for nuclear in places that have the expertise and aren’t advanced in RE (which is basically every western country except Italy) but we are way too far behind. It would be too hard politically, too slow and too expensive. We should keep going on RE.

    On the surprise about the SA Govt aiming for 100% RE, some people will hate me for this but there really is marginal difference between a Marshall and Weatherill government. Same-same is true in SA (which is not necessarily a criticism of either).

  18. briefly says:
    Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 12:22 pm

    A place in our world leading and very generous voluntary refugee resettlement program is denied for every country shopper arriving by boat. Exactly why are the country shoppers more entitled to a place than someone in some godforsaken refugee camp who can’t afford to country shop?

    We can’t take them all but we do our bit.

  19. nath, I door knocked the areas where we lost votes. They are not mansion-land. Not at all. The comfortable swung to Labor. Their fears centre on the climate, but their immediate needs are satisfied. They have an easier choice to make. Working people have fears around both the climate and their jobs. They have a very difficult choice. It’s not a wonder they are so troubled. They were startled into voting Liberal, though they really did not want to. Life is hard for people in the outer suburbs. After all, it is because of their many difficulties that they live there in the first place.

    There’s no sweet spot here for most people. There is simply a rock and a hard place.

  20. briefly

    They’d be thinking he was the exception, all the rest would definitely have been simultaneously ‘dole bludging’ and ‘taking our jobs’ 🙁

  21. The Liberals and the Greens are very happy with the program of exemplary cruelty that passes for the treatment of refugees. They prosper by the inhuman treatment of the powerless and the voiceless. They like it. They have done very well from it. There will be more of it.

  22. Seeing that W.A has voted for the Coalition strongly for decades I don’t find any real surprises in the election result for Perth.

    There are numerous outer suburbs in Melbourne with similar issues to you mention which voted over 60% ALP PV.

  23. Just explain to us again how much the ALP renewables target and 50% EV share of new car sales wasn’t going to cost us, again?

    We have had this argument. And I agree the policies and the means to make it fair to all were not sold well – inconceivable considering how much time they had to nail the sell down. Inconceivable, as they had a great template in the Gillard carbon price that was negotiated with Windsor to take into account the hardships that would be felt in rural and regional areas.

    The most economically responsible action is to rapidly reduce our emissions. Failure to address climate change is the quickest and surest path to the stone age. Failure of Australia to do its bit risks the global coordinate efforts to address climate change or risks international alienation and being relegated to a new economy backwater.

  24. You guys

    If we were a homogeneous mass it wouldnt be pretty.
    Interesting how you exclude yourself from it. Bro, you are one of us.

  25. So Briefly, maybe you are going to have to accept that you live in one of the most dominant liberal held areas in the country and make your peace with it. Because the next federal election will not be decided in Western Australia. They will continue to vote strongly for the Liberals at the Federal level.

  26. “I wonder why some people continue to champion nuclear.”

    $$$$$

    Big mining and energy companies are generous backers of LNP (& ALP), and concentrating wealth in the hands of the few seems to be their main ambition. Governments also want mining royalties – which is why Qld backs new coal and gas even though it is going out of fashion.

    Distributed energy/power = distribution of political power, weakens their generous patrons and reduces royalties.

    Judith Sloan is in the oz today gloating about how hard Taylor is going to make life for renewables as he promote coal and nuclear. The sheer joy the Oz writers have in their self-interested c@#tiness causes me dispair.

    Australia’s failure to plan for transition to a zero carbon future and changed climate (and fight any transition) could see us become an economic basketcase and backwater within the next 20-30 years.

  27. Simon² Katich® says:
    Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 12:36 pm

    Explain to me how little old Australia producing less than 2% of global emissions ” risks international alienation and being relegated to a new economy backwater” yet China, India and the US generating basically 50% of global emissions between the three of them are going to be ok?

  28. Employers will face a crackdown on cash-in-hand payments from July 1, with new measures to stop businesses from claiming tax deductions for cash payments even though they’re ignoring tax withholding rules.

    If a contractor fails to supply their Australian Business Number and an employer doesn’t deduct tax from their invoice, those wage payments will not be tax deductible either.

    The move is yet another black economy measure coming into effect in two weeks’ time.

    The crackdown comes after research into lost tax income found Australian businesses had previously been able to claim tax deductions for practices that were actually black economy activities.

    This meant businesses had previously been able to pay their staff in cash and then under-declare their income, and if that lack of declaration was later uncovered by the tax office the company would then be able to claim a “pay as you go” withholding deduction for those cash wages.

    “You could say there is a bit of a loophole to be closed here, to encourage proper wages made to staff as well as payments to contractors,” Tax Office assistant commissioner Peter Holt said.

    If a contractor doesn’t give a business an ABN when invoicing, companies should pay the top marginal tax rate to the Tax Office.

    Small businesses who have not been abiding by the rules are invited to come forward ahead of time so they can maintain their deductions and “may be entitled to reduced penalties”.

    It’s unknown how much the new rules will recoup in terms of tax dollars though assistant commissioner Holt believes the move will stop businesses in their tracks when under-reporting income.

    “Transacting in cash is not illegal. When transacting in cash though, it is often used to deliberately hide income.”

    The introduction of single-touch payroll to all Australian businesses will make it easier for the Tax Office to see what a company pays staff in real time.

    Those falling foul of the new system will also face a range of penalties.

  29. briefly says:
    Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 11:59 am
    “… This is a distillation of Lib ideology. It is a completely false account of life in a broken labour market, a repressed economy and a dysfunctional political order. But enough people buy it to keep the Liberals in power. Labor have no really coherent pitch on the economy. They need one.“
    —————————————

    Yes. Unfortunately, the conservative line on the nexus between job security and business profitability is the entrenched view with enough voters to keep the Liberals ahead as perceived better economic managers, simply because they are seen as better guarantors of business profitability.

    Someone should poll support for the following propositions, and Labor should look carefully at the results:

    1. “Too much, or the wrong type of, regulations and tax could choke off business activity enough to put your job in danger.”

    2. “Your boss cannot be trusted to pay you fairly, respect your rights or keep you safe at work, without government regulation to keep them in line.”

    I suspect (1) gets higher agreement than (2), but I am not sure. While the political contest remains a fight on these terms, and if more agree with (1) than with (2), I don’t see how Labor wins. Except if the Libs preside over an undeniable economic wreck.

    (I think during 2005-07, more may have agreed with (2) than with (1), while the economy was still looking bulletproof and WorkChoices was empowering businesses to reveal their true colours more. This may help explain Labor’s successful negation of the Lib’s perception as better economic managers in 2007.)

  30. doyley @ #100 Tuesday, June 18th, 2019 – 10:40 am

    If the CFMMEU is such a “ rogue “ union why did’t Albanese go the whole hog and announce labor would cut all ties with the union nationally ? No longer affiliate with the union and no longer accept donations. Simple.

    Instead Albanese sticks his big boof head into what had been a low profile process and derails all the behind the scenes work being done by McManus and others to remove Setka. The result of his intervention into a Victorian union matter is all of the focus nationally is now on union division and conflict at a time when the labour movement in this country needs to stand united against Morrison and his anti worker ideology.

    It did not need to get to this. All Albanese needed to do was bide his time until Setka fronted court later this month and when Setka had already confirmed he would plead guilty to at least one criminal charge.

    However, it now appears Albanese was simply looking for a fight to raise his profile so he targets one man in one state and goes after him in what he thought would be a easy PR win. Who cares about the collateral damage it would do ?

    All of the hard work by McManus and others now appears derailed and the end result is union pitted against union. All for what ?

    It did not need to be like this but perhaps this is what Albanese planned all along.

    The Shorten approach of softly softly be all things to all people failed catastrophically.

    It’s time for Labor to remove the barnacles and show some strength and passion doing it.

    GO ALBO !

  31. Explain to me how little old Australia producing less than 2% of global emissions ” risks international alienation and being relegated to a new economy backwater” yet China, India and the US generating basically 50% of global emissions between the three of them are going to be ok?

    I already have. Several times. If you havent clued on to how international relations works by now I am at a loss as to how else to explain it.

    As usual, right wing political ideology trumps all reasoning. First – ‘climate change doesnt exist, it is a green socialist conspiracy’. Then, after it is impossible to deny – ‘humans arent causing it, it is a green socialist conspiracy’. Then, when again it is impossible to deny – ‘OK, there is climate change, humans are causing it, but we cant do anything about it, it is a Green Socialists conspiracy’. Then – ‘OK, there is technology to do something about it but little insignificant Australia shouldn’t do anything as it is expensive, greens yadda yadda’.

    You right wing nutters have no credibility on the issue. You cant be taken seriously anymore – your constantly found wrong, over and over. You treat it like a game – yet if it were, you would have been relegated so many times you wouldn’t get a run in a pub competition. It would be laughable if it wasn’t so serious.

  32. Diogenes
    Australia is in the enviable position of not having to de-commission any nuclear power plants nor work out what to do with stuff that doesn’t belong on this planet for 100,000 years.

    Australia will not build a nuclear plant for the same reason all other attempts have stalled. In the end governments get sick of throwing money at it.

  33. nath says:
    Tuesday, June 18, 2019 at 12:52 pm

    So Briefly, maybe you are going to have to accept that you live in one of the most dominant liberal held areas in the country and make your peace with it. Because the next federal election will not be decided in Western Australia. They will continue to vote strongly for the Liberals at the Federal level.

    I do certainly acknowledge Lib dominance in WA. This been the case for more than 40 years. It’s reflected in the poverty of our institutions, in the declines in the labour income-share of the economy, in the recurring failure to invest more wisely in the urban economy, in the appallingly weak initiatives in innovation, the knowledge economy, new business formation, the environment, the education sectors and creative industries. We have a very conservative political culture in WA. We are still a largely colonial economy that is taken completely for granted by the rest of the country.

    The urban economy in particular is under-invested. It is very badly under-capitalised. This is a feature of Lib-dominance.

  34. The next election was probably already decided in Queensland last month. The Liberals have the ascendancy in most of the country. When they figure out how to take Labor seats in Victoria, there will be sfa left.

  35. The Right know they’re playing games with climate change. This suits them. It means they can use the environment to campaign against Labor. They are professional denialists. It’s keeping them in office.

  36. This tweet is very telling

    Conversation

    Donald J. Trump
    @realDonaldTrump
    The story in the
    @nytimes
    about the U.S. escalating attacks on Russia’s power grid is Fake News, and the Failing New York Times knows it. They should immediately release their sources which, if they exist at all, which I doubt, are phony. Times must be held fully accountable

  37. The Reactionary project is very well thought-through, imo. They keep on winning. The more success they have in accentuating inequality, in fostering poverty, in whittling away at educational and other sources of opportunity and mobility, the more political gains they are able to make.

    We have a highly monopolised market sector, an enfeebled public sector, a high degree of concentration of wealth, income and power, acute political alienation and resentment. This is the dystopia the Right want. They’ve created it. In turn it sustains them in power.

  38. Yes it’s not hard to see Fitzgibbon in the backroom sharpening the dagger.

    He has been shown to be a dud. Lost 14pts on his primary in the election.

  39. Bucephalus @ #165 Tuesday, June 18th, 2019 – 12:20 pm

    Please do keep rolling out that guff – how many elections have you lost/not won using that bollocks? I’m counting four in a row.

    The point – which both you and Briefly seem to be missing – is that the ALP is not using this as their strategy. Instead, they try too hard to be all things to all people. Essentially, they promise to be a kinder and gentler “liberal-lite” party, promising not to change much at all.

    They tinker around the edges on taxation, but avoid the really significant changes we actually need, and otherwise rarely discuss the economy at all – let alone point out that it is rapidly becoming a third-world basket case economy with no actual manufacturing capability or technical expertise left. They try and walk both sides of the street on renewables, on education (i.e. public vs private) and even on health – which should be one of their strongest suits. They seriously misread the electorate on security policy, migration policy and population policy. They appear to be afraid to take a stand on anything for fear of losing a few votes.

    They will not win an election this way, as has been demonstrated, and as you yourself correctly point out.

    It is time to try something just a little braver. They are the only party that can do this credibly.

    And FFS, what have they got to lose?

  40. Bucephalus @ #180 Tuesday, June 18th, 2019 – 12:53 pm

    Explain to me how little old Australia producing less than 2% of global emissions ” risks international alienation and being relegated to a new economy backwater” yet China, India and the US generating basically 50% of global emissions between the three of them are going to be ok?

    The levels of ignorance and/or malicious and wilful mendacity in this post leaves me breathless 🙁

  41. I am still very much of the view that some are falling in to the trap of over analysing what happened. I think the overwhelming lessons for Labor to come out of the election loss are really not that much different from those the Liberals had to learn post 1993. The unfortunate reality is that elections are not won by oppositions promising significant policy change/reform. That was my fear right through the lead up to the election, but like most of us, I was falsely reassured by the polls. It was much the same for the Coalition in 1993 with fightback; they were ahead in the polls right through the campaign, but in the end, lost.

    The reality is, negative fear campaigns work. The other reality is, oppositions don’t win elections when they become the focus. Labor over this next term must have a ruthless focus on the government and not be diverted from it. Exactly what form that takes will naturally be determined by circumstances, the state of the economy etc, but early indications are that our economy is in trouble and therefore Labor will have plenty to work with. Then, as the election comes closer and it comes time to lock down an election policy platform, it will be important to make that platform a small target for a scare campaign, so that the focus can be kept on why the government needs to go. Howard’s “comfortable and relaxed” campaign of 1996 and Labor’s 2007 campaign are the templates for this. In the end, change is only achieved when intrenched in government; it isn’t achieved from opposition.

  42. Victoria @ #189 Tuesday, June 18th, 2019 – 1:23 pm

    What a piece of excrement

    Kyle Griffin
    @kylegriffin1
    · 7h
    Conspiracy theorist and InfoWars host Alex Jones sent child pornography to the lawyers for the families of the Sandy Hook tragedy, their lawyers stated in court documents.

    The lawyers said that they have contacted the FBI, CT Post reports. (link: https://www.ctpost.com/local/ctpost/article/Lawyers-Alex-Jones-sent-child-porn-to-Sandy-Hook-14005437.php) ctpost.com/local/ctpost/a…

    THIS GUY IS THE ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE!

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