Newspoll: 53-47 to Labor

The second Newspoll for the year finds no continuation of the Coalition’s recent improving trend.

After a period of improving poll results for the Coalition, the latest Newspoll records a tiny shift on primary votes to Labor, but not another to alter their existing lead of 53-47 from a fortnight ago. Labor is up one point on the primary vote to 39%, after a three-point drop last time, while the Coalition is steady on 37%, retaining their two-point gain in the last poll. The Greens are steady on 9%, while One Nation is down a point to 5%, the lowest it’s been in a year. Scott Morrison’s personal ratings are improved, with approval up three to 43% and disapproval down two to 45%, and his lead as prime minister out from 43-36 to 44-35. Bill Shorten is down one on approval to 36% and up one on disapproval to 51%. The poll was conducted Thursday to Sunday from a sample of 1567.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

2,273 comments on “Newspoll: 53-47 to Labor”

  1. Franking Credits was introduced as a clever rort. Firstly Keating, then Costello, didn’t foresee the billion dollar industry it was to become. At its rate of growth it’s clearly unsustainable.
    There exists rorts aplenty. Unrorting the taxation system is a major challenge.
    Rorting is a national pastime. Watching people being caught out rorting is a national pastime.
    The difference this time is the incompetent Abbott/Hockey/Turnbull/Frydenberg/Costello/Howard/Cormann/Morrison government on the eve of being expunged from the government benches, desperate for votes, have stupidly chosen to pursue a rort.
    Looks like a rort, walks like a rort, is a rort.
    Some of the rorters should remain quiet and calm, dare we expose a few more rorts.

  2. Zoomster,

    ‘And compulsory super isn’t affected, so that’s not a worry.’

    I don’t understand your point.

    Is the end result as high as it could be is the real question. That is the selling point of industry funds ‘compare the pair’ ads. It is not to late to change is the call to action.

    Some people are happy to have a smaller balance to use in retirement as they see the cash rebate is unethical and prefer the government to keep the money.

    Others would prefer a bigger balance to retire on.

  3. Every single piece of expert analysis I’ve seen has emphasised that super funds are not affected in any way whatsoever.

    There might be some self managed super funds that suffer a little.

    They might need to realign portfolios, and this might affect in a minor way the value of shares that pump out dividends in excess of the real value of the company, to help take advantage of the stupidity that is dividend imputation credits. It needs to happen it was those economic vandals Howard and Costello that put in two the two biggest inequities, the stupid CGT discount being the other.

    Having said that the time for the actual dividend imputation might well be over too. To soften the impact perhaps it should be be phased out over 5 or so years, but any plan like that is then messed up by the LNP who sabotage poor and move as much money to the spiv mates as possible.

  4. Pee Bee I understand most of the Franking credits argument but don’t fully understand the investment adviser….. but if you need to rely on a rort surely that is bad or lazy investment advice

  5. All very lovely that Hakeem is released. What about the girl who was bound and gagged by Dutton s Goons and with collaboration with the Saudis and sent back to imprisonments and possibly death?

  6. Mogotrone @ #957 Tuesday, February 12th, 2019 – 12:37 am

    All very lovely that Hakeem is released. What about the girl who was bound and gagged by Dutton s Goons and with collaboration with the Saudis and sent back to imprisonments and possibly death?

    Yes. She is probably dead by now, honour killing. It is like Dutton’s goons are intercepting women on their way to the women’s refuge and taking them back to the family home where the husband is waiting with a knife.

  7. Christ! SMH today has three Married At First Sight articles.

    It’s about as stupid as believing that World Championship Wrestling isn’t faked.

    The rest of the SMH isn’t much better: a hodge-podged potpourri of Rugby League beef, domestic abuse and biffo, real estate selling tips, fake political news and breathless STAN commentary.

    Not that it was much good before, but lately… what a rag!

  8. “Christ! SMH today has three Married At First Sight articles.

    It’s about as stupid as believing that World Championship Wrestling isn’t faked.

    The rest of the SMH isn’t much better: a hodge-podged potpourri of Rugby League beef, domestic abuse and biffo, real estate selling tips, fake political news and breathless STAN commentary.

    Not that it was much good before, but lately… what a rag!”

    Might just have something to do with who now owns Fairfax. … Morals of an alley cat, as PJK remarked.

  9. I’m over this constant debate about franking credits cash refunds and Wilson’s scare campaign.

    Fact don’t get in the way of good media fodder for Schomo but let me say my last word on this subject.

    Parliamentary Budget Office provided information clearly demonstrates that SMSF members “are not on struggle street”. For example, in 2014-2015 more than 80 per cent of excess franking credits claimed by SMSFs went to funds with balances above $1 million and more than half by funds with balances above $2.44 million.

    Source: Caitlin Fitzsimmons Real ‘victims’ of Labor’s dividend tax policy are not average Joannes. SMH 24 November 2018.

    Here are the Marginal Coalition seats where the policy might bite for Labor trying to gain seats
    50+ voters 2PP
    Gilmore NSW 61.2 50.6
    Cowper NSW 58.6 54.5
    Page NSW 57.6 52.1
    Grey SA 57.1 51.7
    Barker SA 56.9 54.0
    Boothby SA 51.9 52.3
    Corangamite VIC 51.5 50.6

    Here are the Marginal ALP seats where the policy might bite for Labor trying to retain seats
    50+ Voters 2PP
    Richmond NSW 57.9 4.0
    Lyons TAS 56.1 4.0
    Braddon TAS 55.3 2.4
    Eden-Monaro NSW 53.9 2.9
    Bendigo VIC 51.4 3.9
    Longman QLD 50.1 4.5
    Macquarie NSW 49.7 2.2
    Dobell NSW 49.6 4.8
    Source: Australian Electoral Commission. Federal Voting Entitlement– Elector Count by Division, Age Groups and Gender for all States/Territories as at 30 September 2018.https://www.aec.gov.au/Enrolling_to_vote/Enrolment_stats/elector_count/2018/elector-count-sep-2018.pdf

    The latest newspoll said 50% of those 50-65 said NO to the policy and 59% of those 65+ also said NO, the rest were either for the policy or undecided.

    My view is only Eden Monara and Macqaurie might get a kick in the butt in Labor held seats and Gilmore, Page and Grey will be a bit tougher to win at this election, That’s about it – nothing to sweat over really.


  10. clem attlee says:
    Monday, February 11, 2019 at 9:22 pm

    PS, where AFL has shown growth is in girl’s participation. A lot of my female students have taken it up. However, a number of girls are also playing football.

    Is the “football” a repeat of what was said in the first sentence or a reference to soccer’s attempt to screw with the English language?

  11. Labor know the government holds the winning cards in this game where they are playing for AS lives. Following a vote loss of Phelps’ bill in parliament all the Gov’t has to do is allow through the boats which it normally turns back, then give the rabid MSM video of the arrivals.

    As Mark Dreyfus said:

    “We now know that the Government is set on a scare campaign.”
    Labor is hoping to reach agreement with crossbench MPs, but not leave itself exposed to attacks from the Coalition that it is compromising border security

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-12/labor-shifts-position-on-medical-transfer-bill/10801534

    Trouble is, many Labor supporters want the Phelps bill passed (myself included). Will they lose support if the bill is compromised?

  12. Maude Lynne says:
    Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 6:34 am

    Trouble is, many Labor supporters want the Phelps bill passed (myself included). Will they lose support if the bill is compromised?

    We know the cross benchers and Greens will go nuts about it and Schomo will try to wedge Labor on it – I want the Phelps Bill passed but I think most Laborites will see the cards Labor have been dealt and forgive them for ‘compromising’ on poisoned issue. That’s my 2 cents anyway.

  13. Bushfire Bill @ #883 Monday, February 11th, 2019 – 10:51 pm

    Speaking of death (well, body farms are related to death), can any medical people here tell me why, if it’s such a rare disease, so many people seem to be dying of pancreatic cancer?

    Serious question

    Pancreatic cancers (adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors, & a few rare subtypes like the hereditary ones) have been increasing as a proportion of lethal malignancies worldwide, particularly in countries (like ours) in which people live longer. The age standardised incidence in Australia at present is ~10/100,000 deaths (~11 for males, ~9 for females) .

    Pancreatic malignancies are strongly age related and very rare before 40 (apart from the hereditary ones), so the relative incidence increases as one does not die of something else – like cardiovascular disease or lung cancer. Pancreatic cancers also present late, often too late for surgical ‘cure’, and, until quite recently, chemo and radiotherapy have been pretty useless (they still pretty lousy, but some give 1-2 years median survival). While the the major risk factor of smoking is decreasing (well done on a personal level), others, like obesity and diabetes are becoming more prevalent.

    So, in answer to your question – yes, the incidence of death from pancreatic cancer is increasing, particularly in people of our demographic(s), but it remains rare and nasty.

  14. BB: to expand a bit on what’s already been said about pancreatic cancer, the reason it’s so lethal is that in nearly all cases there’s no way to tell that someone has it until after it is too late. It produces no symptoms in its early stages, and no screening tests can pick it up – there’s no pancreatic equivalent of a mammogram or stool test or skin check or even PSA test. So by the time it’s picked up, it’s already started to spread all through the body, and is thus inoperable and resistant to chemo.

    It’s the military sniper of cancers – it doesn’t shoot that often, but when it does, it doesn’t often miss.

  15. The peoples rep on Q&A was very impressive – her response to the business / lib rep re franking credits and lack of consistency in responses was brilliant.

    If you haven’t seen it do so

  16. I found this puzzling. Doesn’t it imply that Aus authorities are the ones first at fault? Acting on an Interpol red notice issued by the Bahraini government, Australian authorities tipped off their Thai counterparts without informing them that al-Araibi was a refugee.

    Al-Araibi was detained for more than two months after flying to Thailand for his honeymoon in November. Acting on an Interpol red notice issued by the Bahraini government, Australian authorities tipped off their Thai counterparts without informing them that al-Araibi was a refugee. Former Socceroos captain and SBS commentator Craig Foster, who spearheaded the #SaveHakeem campaign, said al-Araibi’s release was a victory for “people everywhere standing up for good, pushing back against regimes who flout international law, for human rights”. TheSatPaper

  17. Albo made a speech.

    As a shadow minister, it is highly unusual for Mr Albanese to speak in caucus unless the matter relates to his portfolio. It is traditionally a forum for debate for backbench MPs.

    However, shadow cabinet members said Mr Albanese was simply spelling out the agreed position of cabinet on the extension of the 24 hour rule, not demanding further changes.

    Labor MPs last night said Mr Albanese’s intervention was a sign that Bill Shorten had mishandled the issue by not arriving at a clear position sooner.

    “I don’t think there’s been a huge shift but there’s a perception that we have,” one Labor MP told The New Daily.

    “Albo just explained something better than Bill, who had failed to do so,” another MP said.

    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2019/02/12/albanese-back-shorten-asylum-bill/

  18. Roger Stone refuses to deny Mueller has a witness who heard him talking to Trump about WikiLeaks

    Jeffrey Toobin’s big New Yorker profile of Trump ally Roger Stone contains a tantalizing nugget about information special counsel Robert Mueller may have about Stone’s conversations with President Donald Trump.

    In his interview with Stone, Toobin asks the now-indicted Trump ally to comment on “persistent rumors that Mueller has a witness who says he heard Trump and Stone on a speakerphone discussing WikiLeaks.”

    Stone simply replied by saying, “Prove it.”

    https://www.rawstory.com/2019/02/roger-stone-refuses-deny-mueller-witness-heard-trump-stone-talking-wikileaks/

  19. Fr Rod Bower
    ‏@FrBower
    10h10 hours ago

    Paladin’s pocketing more than $17 million a month on #Manus. That’s 85% profit on tax payers money #Qanda we need a Federal #ICAC

  20. ‘Bad news for the president’: Fox News analyst explains why Trump could go down in Jeff Bezos blackmail case

    Fox News senior judicial analyst Andrew Napolitano on Monday warned that an alleged extortion plot against Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos “could be bad news” for President Donald Trump.

    “Here’s the essence of what Jeff Bezos claims,” he explained. “He was admonished by AMI’s people: ‘If you continue your investigation — wherever it goes — we will publish more photos of you.’”

    “Now that is an act of blackmail,” Napolitano insisted. “Because it is an effort to prevent him from doing what he has a right to do by the threat of exposing something.”

    According to Napolitano, there is suspicion that the White House was involved in the alleged crime.

    “Because of the close relationship between [AMI CEO] David Pecker and Donald Trump,” he remarked. “I’ve seen no evidence of this. But that is the implication in the media, that if Jeff Bezos continues with his investigation, that’s where it will lead

    https://www.rawstory.com/2019/02/bad-news-president-fox-news-analyst-explains-trump-go-jeff-bezos-blackmail-case/

  21. Andrew @ #969 Tuesday, February 12th, 2019 – 6:04 am

    BB: to expand a bit on what’s already been said about pancreatic cancer, the reason it’s so lethal is that in nearly all cases there’s no way to tell that someone has it until after it is too late. It produces no symptoms in its early stages, and no screening tests can pick it up – there’s no pancreatic equivalent of a mammogram or stool test or skin check or even PSA test. So by the time it’s picked up, it’s already started to spread all through the body, and is thus inoperable and resistant to chemo.

    It’s the military sniper of cancers – it doesn’t shoot that often, but when it does, it doesn’t often miss.

    Andrew

    It is also because the location of the cancer is very close to the major artery some operating is extremely dangerous.

    Now I have known two people of whom I was very, very fond die of pancreatic cancer. Oddly enough they both had the same surname and origins way back in time (Northern Ireland), reminded me very much of one another – both extremely intelligent with a quirky sense of humour. There were some other similarities in appearance. Made me think of a possible genetic connection.

  22. Got to say pancreatic cancer is hopefully the one I don’t get. Saw my father diagnosed and dead within 8 weeks – hideous and saw him degenerate very quickly from the strong father I use to know. Still have those visions 7 years after his death.

    Mark Dreyfuss did very well on Q&A and hopefully all the ALP verbalise it like that and I would be a beneficiary of the rort. I have recently retired I hadn’t allowed for it in my financial planning therefore don’t expect it.

  23. lizzie

    I assume that what happened was there was that he was simply listed as an Australian citizen, and that the authorities didn’t have a list that put him into a different class of Australian citizens.

    With all the Big Brother ‘their eyes are everywhere’ tosh we read, almost any interaction one has with almost any government agency suggests that they know remarkably little, even in areas where they should.

    And people would be outraged if they discovered that there were lists of “Australian citizens who can’t safely leave the country’ even if there should be.

  24. The Saudis ‘have leverage over Trump’ that will let them get away with murder: Retired admiral

    Retired Rear Admiral John Kirby on Monday suggested that Saudi Arabia has some kind of “leverage” over President Donald Trump that would allow the country to skate on accusations that its top officials ordered the murder of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

    Kirby then explained how the Trump administration is so dependent on the Saudis that the country likely now believes it can get away with anything.

    “They have leverage over Trump,” he said. “I think they are absolutely seeing signs from the Trump administration that they’re going to continue to get away with this. It’s what both sides are doing — the Saudis and the Trump administration — just playing for time.”

    https://www.rawstory.com/2019/02/saudis-leverage-trump-will-let-get-away-murder-retired-admiral/

  25. Is the “football” a repeat of what was said in the first sentence or a reference to soccer’s attempt to screw with the English language?

    Outdoor futsal.

  26. How is soccer calling itself ‘football’ screwing with the English language when soccer was the first game called ‘football’? And indeed, the game where actually the only part of you meant to deal with the ball is your foot.

  27. Good morning Dawn Patrollers.

    According to Eryk Bagshaw Experts believe Liberal MP Tim Wilson may have breached privacy laws by failing to tell hundreds of people who signed up to a petition that their names, addresses, phone numbers and emails would be transferred to a multibillion-dollar fund manager.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/liberal-mp-tim-wilson-faces-breach-of-privacy-claims-20190210-p50wtk.html
    David Crowe reports that Labor’s shadow cabinet has signed off on a modified refugee bill that could still pass Parliament. So stand by for some fun and games in parliament this morning.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/labor-shadow-cabinet-signs-off-on-modified-refugee-bill-that-could-still-pass-parliament-20190211-p50x16.html
    Katharine Murphy says that following a substantial rhetorical bombardment from Scott Morrison, Labor will seek agreement on three amendments to the crossbench bill.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/feb/11/labor-shifts-position-on-medical-transfer-bill-under-pressure-from-government
    Sam Maiden tells us how Anthony Albanese has made a rare intervention in ALP caucus to back Bill Shorten’s contentious changes to a plan to allow for the medical evacuations of asylum seekers.
    https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/national/2019/02/12/albanese-back-shorten-asylum-bill/
    Michelle Grattan says that now the crossbenchers must decide between something or nothing on the medical transfers bill.
    https://theconversation.com/crossbenchers-must-decide-between-something-or-nothing-on-medical-transfers-bill-111551
    Meanwhile Scott Morrison has not ruled out axing a $234 million deal with Bob Katter if he sides with Labor to force a recall of Parliament to deal with the royal commission.
    https://www.outline.com/tnVsnS
    Jennifer Hewett says that Morrison is raising the national security beacon – to keep the Coalition safe!
    https://www.outline.com/KEcXxz
    Latika Bourke reports that Richard Di Natale has been forced to apologise to Kevin Rudd, after the Greens leader called the former prime minister a “sociopath” on live television. Richard’s really not going that well.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/richard-di-natale-apologises-to-kevin-rudd-over-q-and-a-sociopath-slur-20190211-p50wx7.html
    Greg Jericho examines and outs into perspective the taxation policy being proposed by Labor and what the government is saying about it. Well worth reading!
    https://www.theguardian.com/business/grogonomics/2019/feb/12/the-government-only-wants-you-to-focus-on-half-the-story-labors-taxes
    AustralianSuper, which once warned against changing dividend imputation tax, now backs Labor’s franking credits policy.
    https://www.outline.com/YDVNyC
    Tony Wright says Morrison’s booklet reveals recipe for a pumped-up scare campaign.
    https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/scott-morrison-s-booklet-reveals-recipe-for-a-pumped-up-scare-campaign-20190211-p50x1n.html
    More than half of all aged-care providers have missed a deadline by the royal commission to provide a list of all incidents of abuse and neglect going back five years despite clear warnings they will face “careful scrutiny” if they fail to comply.
    https://www.outline.com/sLuDqt
    Peter Hartcher writes about the status of democracy in Thailand.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/brotherly-love-fails-thai-king-20190211-p50x2z.html
    Stephen Bartholomeusz says that one of the biggest fears that the banks had in the early stages of the royal commission, stemming from its focus on responsible lending, was that they could end up with a lot more responsibility for the outcomes of their lending.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/banking-and-finance/how-removing-two-letters-could-have-hurt-financial-system-20190211-p50wzb.html
    Craig Emerson in the ASR says that with Tim Wilson’s sham inquiry Trumpism has arrived in Australia.
    https://www.outline.com/ZS9GTN
    Labor has asked the corporate regulator to investigate a failed Queensland lobbying firm which donated to the Liberals while in financial turmoil.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/feb/12/labor-seeks-inquiry-into-firms-donations-to-liberals-despite-financial-trouble
    The report is in, bank shares have rallied and we could almost hear the collective sigh of relief from bank boards, executives and investors. While Commissioner Kenneth Hayne has handed down an impressive document, it is essentially an exercise in tinkering and, even if implemented and enforced by a suddenly lively force of regulators, would not be enough to fix the fundamental flaws in Australia’s banking culture, writes Kim Wingerei in his two-part analysis of the Commission’s final report.
    https://www.michaelwest.com.au/haynes-final-impressive-tinkering-but-big-banking-flaws-remain/
    Jenna Price explains how our social security system hurts women with young children. She says the government’s ParentsNext is a scandalous misuse of the powers of those who run social security in this country.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/our-social-security-system-hurts-women-with-young-children-20190211-p50wwy.html
    Michaelia Cash’s former media adviser has admitted in court that he leaked details of a federal police raid on the Australian Workers’ Union but declined to say who tipped him off.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/feb/11/michaelia-cashs-former-adviser-wont-reveal-who-tipped-him-off-on-awu-raids
    London’s Sunday Telegraph goes into the precarious nature of the Eurozone as it currently stands.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/the-economy/the-eurozone-hell-that-haunts-brussels-20190211-p50wxg.html
    The Banking RC Report marginalises small business borrowers, effectively calling them sore losers and whingers and telling them to bugger off once and for all, writes Dr Evan Jones.
    https://independentaustralia.net/life/life-display/banking-rc-report-the-banks-have-learned-how-to-rort-the-system,12361
    South Australia’s $2.2 billion desalination plant would be used to help River Murray flows, under a plan the State Government will consider. A $2 million report examining South Australian water use, including how the desalination plant could be better used, is expected to be handed to Environment Minister David Speirs within months.
    https://www.outline.com/ZrMftA
    In an op-ed two asylum seeker advocates write that we can balance compassion and safety as a country.
    https://www.smh.com.au/national/we-can-balance-compassion-and-safety-as-a-country-20190211-p50wyz.html
    Australians have had enough of the Coalition’s complicity with Saudi, savagery and ignoring international law, writes human rights lawyer and Greens candidate for Dixon, Benedict Coyne.
    https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/ignoring-international-law-the-dutton-and-morrison-way,12364
    The AFR says that Bendigo is one of a number of regional banks that have delivered poor financial performance and then tried to blame someone else and it’s time for them all to stop whingeing.
    https://www.outline.com/dzxuCq
    The NSW government has rolled out the second phase of its $1.1 billion Social and Affordable Housing Fund, choosing four community housing providers to build 1000 homes.
    https://www.outline.com/w9jCYA
    John Silvester tells us how, just a day after a front-page story said Tony Mokbel was a powerful enforcer inside Barwon Prison, he was stabbed inside that very jail and left in a serious condition.
    https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/tony-mokbel-was-a-big-target-in-the-biggest-game-in-town-20190211-p50x37.html
    Victorian planning minister Richard Wynne says removing flammable cladding from the most high-risk buildings in Melbourne is a “complex problem which will take some time to fix properly.” The Victorian Building Authority (VBA) has said it could take two years to remove and replace combustible aluminium polyethylene composite panels from high rise apartments and hotels around the city.
    https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/feb/12/it-could-take-two-years-to-replace-flammable-cladding-in-melbourne-says-building-authority
    The bidding war among NSW political parties over solar panels has been joined by the Greens who want photovoltaic systems and batteries to be made compulsory for all new dwellings.
    https://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/nsw-greens-push-for-mandatory-solar-and-batteries-for-all-new-homes-20190211-p50x2h.html
    Cara Waters reports that The Franchise Council of Australia has asked the regulator to investigate troubled franchise Jump! Swim Schools after a rising number of complaints.
    https://www.smh.com.au/business/small-business/watchdog-asked-to-investigate-jump-swim-schools-20190211-p50wy1.html
    Apple need to fix battery problem before it’s too late.
    https://www.outline.com/qUjJwd

    Cartoon Corner

    David Rowe and an OTT Morrison.

    David Pope and high rise developments.

    Cathy Wilcox gets ready for today’s vote.

    From Matt Golding.






    A couple from John Shakespeare.


    Peter Broelman and the parliamentary sitting schedule.

    Zanetti’s back on the job!

    You can trust Johannes Leak!
    https://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/18d1dcb3af920657f68b3edd57e23cbe

    From the US.






  28. ‘Tens of thousands of fighters in Syria and Iraq’: Top US commander issues warning as he visits the region – as Donald Trump plans to withdraw US troops

    A top US commander has issued a warning saying there are ‘tens of thousands’ of ISIS fighters spread across Syria and Iraq – despite President Donald Trump’s declaration that the terrorist organisation had been defeated.

    General Joseph Votel said ISIS fighters are ‘dispersed and disaggregated’ in the Iraqi-Syria border area, but that there is ‘leadership’, ‘fighters’ and ‘facilitators’ there.

    His comments came as the US is set to begin its withdrawal of troops from Syria, following a surprise announcement by Trump in December.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6691289/Top-commander-issues-warning-visits-region.html

  29. ‘Football’ refers to games played on foot, not with foot.

    ‘Soccer’, an abbreviation of association football, was in common usage in England until relatively recently, particularly in the north, until it was deemed unfashionable by FA marketers.

    No one sport owns the term football.

  30. zoomster

    With all the Big Brother ‘their eyes are everywhere’ tosh we read, almost any interaction one has with almost any government agency suggests that they know remarkably little, even in areas where they should.

    Mmmm. ScoMo and Pyne shouting that they’re “keeping us safe” doesn’t fill me with confidence. Security seems to rely more on the lowest cog in the machine. I’m thinking of the “country policeman” who started the investigation that led to a “huge drug haul”. And even then, I wonder if the story is genuine.

  31. So far it seems the Saudis have leverage over Trump, the Israelis have leverage over Trump and the Russians have leverage over Trump. There may be others yet to be revealed.
    Looks like our Government has been asleep at the wheel.

    Oops forgot to add the National Enquirer.

  32. mick Quinlivan says:
    Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 12:26 am
    Pee Bee I understand most of the Franking credits argument but don’t fully understand the investment adviser….. but if you need to rely on a rort surely that is bad or lazy investment advice.

    Mick, it is a complex issue and that is why people pay investment advisor who have the time to sit around and think about the implications of regulatory change to your financial wellbeing.

    These advisors also attend conferences and swap ideas so often they come up with similar advise.

    If you cannot understand a professional who’s bread and butter is understanding these things, perhaps you don’t know as much as you think.

    The premise that because you feel it is a rort (an emotive term) they see as how the situation is now and how it will change and how to work their way through the change to best advantage.

    Describing it as lazy or bad advice, is just plain wrong. It takes effort to understand what is happening and then thinking what the best tactic to move forward.

    Bad and lazy advise is to sit back and do nothing.

  33. Desert Qlder

    Just checked my 1889 edition of Chamber Encyclopedia (love those books) – no listing of anything under ‘soccer’, but there is a game described as ‘football’ — only one.

  34. PeeBee

    Your financial advisor only refers to ‘self managed super funds’ as being affected. Your contention was that compulsory super funds would be.

    You have still not provided any evidence to support your contention.

  35. re Pancreatic Cancer

    Google is your friend – Cancer Council of Australia, Pancreatic Cancer

    Worth noting is the 5 year survival of 8.7%. That’s a shockingly bad number. As Wombat and others have said, it is the location where the cancer can ‘silently’ grow before it causes symptoms that is a big factor is the ‘late’ diagnosis. The other great killer from ‘delayed’ diagnosis is ovarian cancer – growing away there in the pelvis and by the time it gets big enough to cause discomfort or pain, it’s too big.

    I’ve anaesthetised (with the go-to surgeon in a major teaching hospital) a lot of patients with pancreatic cancer deemed suitable for a Whipples Procedure which involves the removal of the ‘head’ of the pancreas (where the majority of cancers occur) which is tucked into the c shaped curved outlet from the stomach, the duodenum. It is very major surgery, with the complex removal and reattachments of lots of pipes, including the biliary system. And then you die.

    (btw, DTT, blood vessels aren’t, or shouldn’t be in the right hands, the major problem)

  36. Itzadream

    My OH uncle had the whipple procedure in early 2017. Two years later he is doing well. Someone noticed that he looked very jaundiced and he took himself to see the GP.

    Not long after this my own BIL was diagnosed with stomach cancer and was gone within weeks. Thems the breaks. Sigh

  37. Victoria

    We had a friend whose wife (a nurse) left him at home to go to a party because he had a migraine. He wasn’t in bed when she came home, she thought he had stayed up to read. Found him dead in the morning where she’d said goodbye to him the night before, sitting on the deck with a glass of red.

    Turned out he had a massive brain tumour, which had only manifested as the occasional headache.

    He was in his late thirties, with three young kids.

  38. Morning all and thanks BK for today’s wrap.

    Those cheering on Amy Klobuchar’s candidacy may be interested in this.

    She could only do that by appealing to both swing groups in America’s volatile electorate, blue-collar Trump Democrats and white-collar, anti-Trump Republicans. Democrats in Minnesota are known as the Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party because of their 1944 merger with the Farmer-Labor Party. Blue-collar Trumpers can see Klobuchar as a Democrat in that tradition rather than a fan of the identity politics that seems to be sweeping the national party. And white-collar former Republicans can see her as someone like themselves: educated, tolerant, ambitious, conscientious.

    Trump’s margin was so thin that any significant defection among either group dooms him. Many anti-Trump Republicans nevertheless voted for him in 2016 because they thought Hillary Clinton was worse. The same was true for a good number of the blue-collar Trump Democrats. Klobuchar will be difficult to demonize because of her manner and her record. If the best nickname he can come up with, based on the recent revelations, is something like “Krabby Klobuchar,” she can start measuring the Oval Office draperies.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2019/02/11/amy-klobuchar-is-trumps-worst-nightmare/?utm_term=.a4d2e3160335

  39. Thanks for all the scary cancer stories.

    I was, at one stage, going to add that I asked out of curiosity, not because I had symptoms.

    Now it seems that the main symptom is death.

  40. Just finished watching last night’s QandA.

    Dreyfus could’ve turned that smartarse question about 9,000 voters in Henderson’s seat being affected by Labor’s proposed franking credit reforms back on the questioner. Hoe could’ve done it by asking “How many of those 9,000 are Labor voters, or would’ve voted for Labor at the upcoming election?” or, “How many of those 9,000 have always voted Liberal, will vote Liberal at the next election, and every other election after that”.

    The way the question was framed was that Labor would “lose” these votes. If they never had them in the first place, and are never likely to get them, they haven’t lost a single vote.

    Judging by the applause from the audience though it seems that people are cottoning on to the fact that this is a “wealthfare” rort that needs to be knocked on the head.

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