Senate selections

Labor sorts out its Senate ticket for Queensland, while both parties in Tasmania appear loath to learn from the preselection lessons of 2016.

We seem to be going into an ill-timed poll drought, so to keep things ticking over, here’s a post focusing on Senate preselection news. Please note there’s a post below this one on this Saturday’s Wagga Wagga by-election, which is developing into a fairly interesting contest.

• Queensland Labor’s state conference determined its Senate preselection on the weekend, having been hurried along by a national executive concerned the Liberal leadership crisis might bring on an early election. In doing so it bypassed a vote that was granted to the party membership under rule changes in 2013. The top position has gone to Nita Green, a former staffer to Senator Murray Watt and the favoured candidate of the CFMMEU and United Voice. The position is reserved to the Left, and is being vacated with the retirement of Claire Moore.

Green’s ascendancy has been contentious because party rules reserve the position for a regional representative and she lives in Brisbane, though she says she will move if elected. Supporters of rival Left candidate Tania Major, a Cairns-based indigenous youth advocate and protege of Cape York leader Noel Pearson, have further complained of being ambushed by a process for the factional ballot in which a three-day nominations period was followed immediately by the start of voting.

The second place on the ticket, which is reserved to the dominant Labor Forum sub-faction of the Right, has been retained by incumbent Chris Ketter. The cancellation of the party membership vote saw off any threat from rival nominee Pat O’Neill, former army major and candidate for Brisbane in 2016, although he was reportedly unlikely to win in any case. Number three goes to Frank Gilbert, a former Mackay councillor and candidate for Dawson in 2016, and a member of the Old Guard sub-faction of the Right.

Matthew Denholm of The Australian reports Tasmanian Labor’s union establishment has again lined up against Lisa Singh for Senate preselection, undeterred by the success of a below-the-line voting campaign in overturning her demotion at the 2016 election. Singh will presumably dominate the party member component of the vote, but is reportedly unlikely to do any better than the loseable third position. This is because the dominant Left wants places for an incumbent, Carol Brown, and John Short, the Australian Manufacturing Workers Union official for whom Singh was relegated in 2016, while the Right is defending incumbent Catryna Bilyk.

• Tasmania’s Liberals are also conducting their Senate preselection vote on Saturday, and there are suggestions they too may repeat unhappy history from 2016. Richard Colbeck is again under pressure from conservative forces associated with Senator Eric Abetz, despite having almost matched Lisa Singh’s feat after being dumped to number five in 2016. He found his way back in the recount that followed Stephen Parry’s disqualification in November, and was promoted last week to the outer ministry, making him the only Tasmanian at that level of seniority. Brett Worthington at the ABC reports conservatives want the top position to go to Brett Whiteley, veteran of three winning and three losing campaigns at both federal and state level in Braddon, or alternatively to a woman. Further demotion beyond that would be particularly remarkable for Colbeck, as he is the only one of the four Tasmanian Liberal Senators facing re-election, the others having scored six-year terms. The other nominees for the preselection were detailed in an earlier instalment.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

4,088 comments on “Senate selections”

Comments Page 80 of 82
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  1. Oh my word, Rex expressed an opinion on a political issue and according to self entitled Catmomma that was bullying and so it’s open season on him. Seriously deluded! Ms Husar must be so thankful that Catmomma has spared her Rex’s wrath.

  2. Back from my local chapter of AA, still pondering the notion of a “Higher Power” – maybe GG might provide sage advice thereof – even Yabba?

  3. Clem Attlee @ #3951 Sunday, September 9th, 2018 – 7:30 pm

    Oh my word, Rex expressed an opinion on a political issue and according to self entitled Catmomma that was bullying and so it’s open season on him. Seriously deluded! Ms Husar must be so thankful that Catmomma has spared her Rex’s wrath.

    I’m quaking in my boots at your keyboard wrath. Not.

  4. Toby Esterhase @ #3951 Sunday, September 9th, 2018 – 5:30 pm

    Chris Kenny tweeted earlier that he’d be dropping a hint about tonight’s Newspoll. Anyone brave (daft) enough to watch Sky After Dark seen anything from him yet?

    Curiously we don’t get Sky News on WIN here despite the hype about Sky going to FTA. Obviously an eastern states thing.

  5. Eunoe @ #3942 Sunday, September 9th, 2018 – 7:08 pm

    Yes, the silence of lots of financially and policy literate Liberals we know has been very telling for a very long time, but when push comes to shove they still knowingly, wilfully, reflexively vote Liberal.

    Deeply entrenched is the commitment to take whatever steps necessary to stop daddy spinning in his grave.

  6. Allan Moyes @ #3946 Sunday, September 9th, 2018 – 7:18 pm

    Dtt @ 6.34pm

    I have no idea what happens with goods at present so won’t comment on that side but so far as people are concerned the UK is not part of the Schengen zone so those arriving from another EU country are subject to checks already, whichever mode of transport you use.

    For example, if travelling on Eurostar from Brussels or Paris, you go through immigration at the relevant railway stations in those countries and simply step off the train in London. From experience an EU passport makes little difference – there is still a queue! There are no customs checks as the UK is, as an EU member, in the common customs area.

    This, of course, will disappear with Brexit. The real problem, should there be “no deal”, is that countless regulations affecting such things as the common aviation area (the EACA) will no longer apply and there will be no flights between the UK and the EU countries. As there is a common EU open skies agreement with the US, it will also affect flights to/from there. There may not even be overflying rights so forget travel to the ME, the sub-continent and Australia. UK pilots are currently covered by EU regulations so they will have to get a new licence before the cut-off time. Intra-UK flights may therefore be affected if they cannot legally fly.

    The stupidity with which the UK government is conducting talks with the EU is causing many people to think that there will be no deal – hence the sense of urgency and possibly even panic. Certainly it is looking very like there will not be a deal and thus a “hard” Brexit will ensue. There is very little time left as there has to be agreement from the other EU member states (and a couple of semi-autonomous regions).

    Should there be no agreement, then the almost two year period of grace after 29 March 2019 so that the UK can adapt to the change will not be granted.

    The lies that were fed to the populace prior to the referendum were contemptible. It was all made to sound so simple when, in fact, it is anything but.

    In addition, there is absolutely no deal that can be agreed to which will be better than being a member of the EU. The xenophobes have cut their own throats.

    Allan

    All good points, but they really do not seem major difficulties.

    Air space agreements could be signed off in an afternoon. Every pilot issues with an interim 1 month licence.

    Just not the major issues people claim.

    I am curious though. If someone flies in from Greece, how does the UK know that they have not got a bag full of goods from Turkey.Is it assumes that Greece did the customs check?

  7. DTT
    ‘If the UK has been stupid enough to import all their food then frankly Brexit is needed. When you are an island it is stupid beyond belief to be importing basic food.’
    I am curious to know how Brexit is going to result in Britain being able to increase its food production by a quarter.

  8. [‘It could be anything you believe in intrinsically that inspires you. Like a cat even. ‘]

    Thanks very much, Cat; but I think I’ve passed that point – though I do love my cat, Lucy, who’s just returned from the outter.

  9. “wouldn’t it be good if a solid independent candidate with the right appeal to Liberal voters gave them a red hot run for their money?!” (Fess) My worry is that if a such a candidate should actually win then he/she will not be in a hurry to provoke a dissolution and general election. Should we try to find someone prepared to run on a policy of doing everything possible to provoke a dissolution as soon as possible?

  10. Hayden’s last minute conversion shows that those in the know back in 83 were right about him…he was gutless. He flirted with some extreme right wing ideas too, did did he not? My old man died three weeks ago and he knew it was coming, but no backsliding from him, he died an atheist , still he was a former brickie and tough.

  11. “We have a pollination of 25 Million, of a Global population of whatever, both of which figures are increasing and will continue to increase…”

    About one in three hundred human beings live in Australia.

  12. Great article on Hayden by Keating.
    I have read previous saying the libs blocked supply as Haydens budget effectively got the government back on track and the libs mostly kept Haydens budget intact after winning.
    Did not realise that Hayden was an early campaigner for equal rights especially in those days.

    https://www.smh.com.au/national/bill-hayden-the-most-visionary-pm-we-never-had-says-paul-keating-20170927-gyplac.html

    Haydens beliefs are his own and he has more than shown he puts people first.

    Peoples beliefs are their own too, they only get dangerous when they start to believe and then impose their beliefs on others.

    The most dangerous ones from the RC into child abuse were the priests saying that people did not understand the power they had, to forgive sin and turn water into blood. It still shakes me to this day that they truly believe they have such power, but it some ways it explains a lot of the culture in the church.

    The sedate ones, among many beliefs I have met and read, say it is a way of life, a community and assistance, belief is not a mandatory requirement.

    I met a bloke on the run once, he left me a book about zen, when we got talking about it he said it was good and interesting but if you got too deep into it it became a way of life.

    years later when my kids were doing calisthenics we were talking with one of the old hands there, she said it was a good club but be careful not to get too involved as it could become a way of life.

  13. Clem Attlee says:
    Sunday, September 9, 2018 at 7:43 pm

    Hayden’s last minute conversion shows that those in the know back in 83 were right about him…he was gutless. He flirted with some extreme right wing ideas too, did did he not? My old man died three weeks ago and he knew it was coming, but no backsliding from him, he died an atheist , still he was a former brickie and tough.
    _________________________
    Good on him Clem. Your old man built houses for families to live in. That’s a noble thing my friend.

  14. Jack Aranda:

    I’m thinking a tad longer term than this parliament. A solid indie taking Wentworth at the by-election has the opportunity to consolidate his/her hold at the election next year or whenever. The Libs will still be on the nose at the next general election, and voters will still be swinging those baseball bats, so there’s every chance an independent candidate in Wentworth will be able to cement their vote having won the seat off the Libs.

  15. “Toby Esterhase
    Chris Kenny tweeted earlier that he’d be dropping a hint about tonight’s Newspoll. Anyone brave (daft) enough to watch Sky After Dark seen anything from him yet?”

    I watched his show for twenty seconds. Sorry but that was my limit to remain (more or less) sane. No Newspoll hints in that time!

  16. Bill Hayden’s decision to convert is his alone and not deserving of criticism.

    As for Pascal’s wager, that would be a forlorn hope. Who’s right? The Catholics? One or other fundamentalist bunch? There are lots to choose from. If it turns out to be the Jehova’s witnesses, you’ll be OK, even if you slammed the door on them. They don’t believe in eternal hellfire. On the other hand, if turns out it’s Islam and you decide to be born again, you’re stuffed.

  17. @DTT

    If the UK has been stupid enough to import all their food then frankly Brexit is needed. When you are an island it is stupid beyond belief to be importing basic food. A blockage in the Chunnel or major fuel shortage, let along the problems if a hot war were to break out makes such a strategy

    Yes, funny you should mention that. I am reading an excellent book at the moment entitled “In theWake of the Plague” :https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/173258.In_the_Wake_of_the_Plague
    To paraphrase a bit: “In the 14th century, central and much of South Western England was agriculturally among the most productive in the world. Only the Ukraine and parts of western Canada and the USA are as propitious for growing grain”

    So, yeah, England should just have stuck to growing grain. Trading with other countries and all that was just a big mistake. And trying to keep peace with Europe and other peoples so trade would supply needs for all was obviously a big mistake. Because “Hot War” affecting the UK in 2018??????

    As Douglas Adams noted (or WTTE), “some people thought is was actually a bad mistake to come down from the trees in the first place”.

  18. Great article on Hayden by Keating.
    I have read previous saying the libs blocked supply as Haydens budget effectively got the government back on track and the libs mostly kept Haydens budget intact after winning.
    Did not realise that Hayden was an early campaigner for equal rights especially in those days.

    https://www.smh.com.au/national/bill-hayden-the-most-visionary-pm-we-never-had-says-paul-keating-20170927-gyplac.html

    Thanks for that link Boris. I’d assert that Hayden was also a great GG.

  19. Clem Atlee
    I think you and I have an almost perfect record of disagreeing about everything.
    But I take this opportunity to extend my condolences on the passing of your Dad.
    Best wishes.

  20. Dtt @ 7.37.

    In the case of air travel, you do go through customs but it is of the variety of green zone/red zone, so your honesty as to what you do or don’t declare plus random checks comes into play. There is no way in a busy international airport where you have many flights arriving one after the other from all over the world that you would know from where the original passenger arrived so far as the customs check is concerned. Immigration is, of course, another matter as your passport is screened.

    Cargo arriving by air would have a manifest showing details such as port of origin and that is dealt with in another part of the airport.

    With regard to the difficulties I mentioned earlier, yes there could (and hopefully will) be a pragmatic solution but time is running out. There is an unimaginable amount of paperwork, licensing etc to be done. As I said, any “deal” has to be agreed to by the other EU members. Given the speed with which governments operate, and particularly when they will all have vested interests, there is very little time left. Originally it as to have been a date in October but I understand this has been pushed back a month. However, from all reports, little has yet been finalised, particularly when the UK government is tearing itself apart in bitter disagreement. The opposition is not much better.

    The open skies agreement between the EU/US will remain but without the UK. The UK will therefore have to negotiate a separate agreement with the US. The original agreement took years, as would any trade, banking, medical, aviation, security – the list goes on – deal between the UK and other non-EU countries. It will also have to negotiate such deals with the EU it has just left!

  21. Current PB Newspoll Prediction
    AVERAGE: ALP 55.5 to 44.5 LNP
    MEDIAN: ALP 55 to 45 LNP
    Respondents: 44

    Yeah, bored. So something to enjoy while waiting.

    In the dark ages, brewsters, women who brewed beer, had some rather odd advertising methods. To be noticed in crowded markets, they tended to wear tall, pointed hats. To indicate when a brew was ready, broomsticks would be placed in the doorways of alehouses. Images of frothing cauldrons full of ready product and six-sided stars to indicate the quality of the brew also abounded. Lastly, out of manifest necessity, cats would be kept in the brewhouses to protect the grains from mice.

    https://bigthink.com/scotty-hendricks/the-dark-history-of-women-witches-and-beer

  22. The UK was importing a significant proportion of its food long before it was in the EU or its predecessors. It was in fact importing significant amounts from significantly further past a less geopolitically friendly Europe (including two very serious German submarine campaigns to starve the UK). Even outside the EU, most of Europe is unlikely to start attacking the UK`s food supply as most European nations are also in NATO or neutral. The closest potentially hostile nation is Russia and their ability to attack the UK, without starting a major world war, is limited by geography and NATO`s military power.

  23. Fess

    There was a great cartoon after Hawke made Hayden GG of Hawke in a pub in the 70s with some mates saying how he’d be pm and Hayden GG.

    But yeah, Hayden was a good GG, good at what he did, a restrained caring person not afraid to speak out.

  24. Surely any decision from a dying person to look to God is a personal decision and not some betrayal of non-believers. We are after all a pluralist society.

  25. Douglas and Milko @ #3975 Sunday, September 9th, 2018 – 7:55 pm

    @DTT

    If the UK has been stupid enough to import all their food then frankly Brexit is needed. When you are an island it is stupid beyond belief to be importing basic food. A blockage in the Chunnel or major fuel shortage, let along the problems if a hot war were to break out makes such a strategy

    Yes, funny you should mention that. I am reading an excellent book at the moment entitled “In theWake of the Plague” :https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/173258.In_the_Wake_of_the_Plague
    To paraphrase a bit: “In the 14th century, central and much of South Western England was agriculturally among the most productive in the world. Only the Ukraine and parts of western Canada and the USA are as propitious for growing grain”

    So, yeah, England should just have stuck to growing grain. Trading with other countries and all that was just a big mistake. And trying to keep peace with Europe and other peoples so trade would supply needs for all was obviously a big mistake. Because “Hot War” affecting the UK in 2018??????

    As Douglas Adams noted (or WTTE), “some people thought is was actually a bad mistake to come down from the trees in the first place”.

    Please do not be facetious D&M. I am not with you and it is just silly and inappropriate.

    What I say makes common sense and indeed it is part of the thoroughly environmentally sound local foods movement. Trade is always good but every society locality etc should have enough brains to ensure it can cope with unexpected disruptions in food and water.

    These are ESSENTIAL .

    Given the UKs chicken little approach to Russia, a hot war is becoming increasingly likely. If such a war were to break out then assuming it did not go nuclear then imported food would not make it into the UK. This should be obvious.

    I do not find it funny or acceptable that you belittle me on such an important matter. I have NEVER ONCE belittled you so try to be less prejudiced.

  26. AM
    In terms of Tory infighting, indeed. There is now a rather large dossier circulating about Mr Johnston tour-d’amour. If the size of the dossier is anything to go by he has not been one to let a chance go by. There are sufficient details to suggest that Mr Johnston has indulged in variety as well as quantity.
    The suggestion is that the May mob have released the dossier to scupper an attempt by Johnston for May’s job.
    May and the May mob deny doing any such thing. As in deny ‘100%’. This prompts the question, ‘When did anyone deny anything 63%? Or 44%?

  27. Aunt Mavis @ #3984 Sunday, September 9th, 2018 – 8:09 pm

    How about this

    Ferrier is sublime. I give you Ludwig.

    Urlicht ~ Primeval Light

    O Röschen rot!
    O little red rose!

    Der Mensch liegt in größter Not!
    Man lies in greatest need!

    Der Mensch liegt in größter Pein!
    Man lies in greatest pain!

    Je lieber möcht’ ich im Himmel sein.
    How I would rather be in heaven.

    Da kam ich auf einen breiten Weg,
    There came I upon a broad path,

    Da kam ein Engelein und wollt’ mich abweisen.
    when came a little angel and wanted to turn me away.

    Ach nein! Ich ließ mich nicht abweisen!
    Ah no! I would not let myself be turned away!

    Ich bin von Gott und will wieder zu Gott!
    I am from God and shall return to God!

    Der liebe Gott wird mir ein Lichtchen geben,
    The loving God will grant me a little light,

    Wird leuchten mir bis in das ewig selig Leben!
    Which will light me into that eternal blissful life!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kRWbd9sAHg

  28. With regard to Brexit and importing food, there must be very few advanced nations who do not import food.

    Australia, for example, imports large quantities of coffee and chocolate, without which life would be….. difficult, since they form respectively the two lowest layers of the food pyramid.

    No doubt there are other foods which we import as well.

    But coffee and chocolate are the essentials. Sine qua non.

  29. In the UK one outcome of the Thatcher-Major years 1979-1997 was the gradual relative decline of much economic activity including agriculture, mining and manufacturing – while “financial services” in London became the UK’s biggest industry. Thus the UK food production has not kept pace with their population growth.

    And the current massive reliance on financial services may be a problem after Brexit if more international financial institutions decide they would be better off shifting resources to mainland Europe.

  30. Boerwar

    Yes, Mr Johnston has been, and continues to be, a thorn. Personally I could never see the attraction when he was being the loveable buffoon prior to the London Olympics or appearing on the BBC TV show, Have I Got News For You. Pompous git, in my view.

    LOL re 100% – it’s much like being 110% committed to something.

  31. Tom the first and best @ #3983 Sunday, September 9th, 2018 – 8:08 pm

    The UK was importing a significant proportion of its food long before it was in the EU or its predecessors. It was in fact importing significant amounts from significantly further past a less geopolitically friendly Europe (including two very serious German submarine campaigns to starve the UK). Even outside the EU, most of Europe is unlikely to start attacking the UK`s food supply as most European nations are also in NATO or neutral. The closest potentially hostile nation is Russia and their ability to attack the UK, without starting a major world war, is limited by geography and NATO`s military power.

    Tom
    If hot war were to break of you have to assume that it would be NATO against Russia and China etc. There would be major effects on sea lanes and food imports would be limited. Apart form the obvious disruption to fuel supplies.

    The sad reality is that NATO is stronger than Russia but not stronger than Russia allied to China.

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