Newspoll: 52-48 to Labor

The latest result from Newspoll lands slightly at the upper end of the government’s recent form.

Courtesy of The Australian, the latest result from Newspoll records Labor with a two-party lead of 52-48, down from 53-47 in the last poll (which was three weeks ago rather than the usual two, owing to Easter). Labor and the Greens are both down a point on the primary vote, to 35% and 9%, with the Coalition and One Nation steady on 36% and 10%. Malcolm Turnbull is up two on approval to 32% and down two on disapproval to 57%, while Bill Shorten is up one to 33% and down one to 53%. Turnbull’s lead as preferred prime minister shifts from 41-32 to 42-33.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,209 comments on “Newspoll: 52-48 to Labor”

  1. peebee @ #1087 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 4:46 pm

    AR, ‘I think the speed you can get on NBN Fibre is actually quite good and essentially exactly as advertised’
    To you maybe, but not to me. My speed at the moment is 135mbps download. The best I can get with NBNCo is UP TO 100 Mbps.
    Of course it is ‘essentially as advertised’ because 1 Mbps is still covered by the ‘up to’ get-out-of-jail clause!

    That is not quite right.
    From the article I linked to earlier.


    He called his internet retailer to ask about their 100 Mbps NBN plan ($80 a month), and here’s where the story gets interesting. They didn’t want to sell him the 100 Mbps plan, recommending a 25 Mbps plan instead, and telling him the NBN had said that, for the coexistence period of 18 months (while ADSL and NBN technologies were running simultaneously), there’d be a slowdown in NBN speeds. Curious, Adam called the NBN and was told that was rubbish, and he should definitely be able to get up to 100 Mbps at his address. He called the retailer back and ordered the 100 Mbps plan. Off-peak he is now getting 25 Mbps, but it fluctuates wildly, and at peak times in the evening he is getting between 2 and 8 Mbps – worse than before. Adam chatted with an IT guy at work and found out broadband retailers were cutting corners … it was all about something called “CVC”.

    As it happens, that little acronym now represents one of the biggest problems facing the NBN: it stands for “Connectivity Virtual Circuit” and is the wholesale price per megabit that the NBN charges to retailers, who then on-sell broadband plans to you and me. The CVC charge is so high, retailers say, that they can’t afford to provide the speeds that NBN infrastructure allows and still make a profit. But those wholesale charges are necessary for the NBN to make a profit too, which it is barely on track to do. The NBN expects to make a meagre 3.2% return on the roughly $30 billion equity taxpayers will inject in total – any lower and it would have to be accounted as an expense rather than an investment, blowing out the budget deficit. One solution, often touted by the telco industry, is a huge writedown to the value of the NBN – probably $20 billion – so it can lower its CVC charge and retailers can “unclog the pipes”.

    https://www.themonthly.com.au/issue/2017/april/1490965200/paddy-manning/network-error

  2. ‘I’m pretty sure that “up to” was only tacked on when FTTN and HFC were added to the mix. Because then attenuation between the premises and the node becomes a limiting factor.

    This shouldn’t apply if you’ve actually got access to FTTP. You get the full 100 Mbps (or more if/when NBNCo fixes their CVC mess). Or if you don’t it’s because the ISP has themselves underprovisioned on capacity, which is something that can happen with any ISP and any connection type.’

    What a way to run a business. We will sell you this petrol and you will get up to 1000 km to the litre. (Which is true if you have an electric vehicle).

  3. Former PM @TonyAbbottMHR on @2GB873, going from criticising Abdel-Magied comments to praising free speech in space of eight minutes #auspol

  4. bemused

    Try claiming against the operators of the compactor or whoever engaged them to operate it

    Yeah, right. ‘Try’ wasting thousands of dollars …

  5. raaraa @ #1091 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 4:48 pm

    On my last comment I realised Opticomm might have done this outside of NBN, then I guess the government can’t enforce it. But then there’s the question of apartments not giving residents a choice in fibre internet, and I believe ACCC was looking into it at one point.

    Companies like Opticomm and TPG are undermining competition at the retail level in Internet provision. They should be stopped or forced to wholesale on identical terms to the NBN.

  6. lizzie @ #1099 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 4:56 pm

    Oh cripes, they’re springing up like mushrooms after rain.

    Sir Clyde Of Nob‏ @nobby15 · 12m12 minutes ago
    Possible New Party Being Considered By Ex Phony Members 26 April – 2017 pic.twitter.com/jRH1UBa8dY

    Plans to launch a counter organisation “for the people of Australia”.

    I see this as a cunning plan by Divided Nation.
    Form a Party of the extreme nutters in an attempt to make themselves look reasonable and rational by comparison. 🙂

  7. Have the Australian Greens clarified that they support Macron for no other reason than he is not Le Pen?
    Or they still doing the old Sanders, Di Natale, Corbyn dirge that there is no difference between Shorten/Turnbull; Clinton/Trump; May and somebody who could actually beat her; and Macron/Le Pen?

  8. Bw

    Have the Australian Greens clarified that they support Macron for no other reason than he is not Le Pen?

    I doubt that who the Australian Greens endorse is uppermost in the minds of French voters.

  9. Jackol

    Thanks for that. I suspect as much.

    Like something from Yes, Minister!, I think they probably wanted to gut it so bad that the public will start believing in the rhetoric that the government should not be doing it and leave it to private enterprises.

  10. Bemused, I saw the builder on Friday. He seemed pretty open to the suggestion of making good on my cornice. A tradie that I chat to from time to time who works on the site told me they are very good and will sort it out. So fingers crossed!

    The point is, as BW has identified, insurance companies are sweet as pie when accepting your premium, f#ck all attention when making a claim. Pricks.

    Just for those who have just tuned in the insurance company in question is RACV.

    (I am clocking the bad-mouthing so I can report it on my assessment when they want to know about my experience with dealing with them!!!)

  11. CTaR1
    True.
    50% of them did not vote in Round 1, apparently.
    This is a bit of a worry.
    But there are positives.
    It means that only 10% of french voters could drag themselves from their lovers’ beds to vote for Le Pen.

  12. Peebee

    I have a feeling the government caved into to these businesses like Opticomm because they could help out the speed of the roll-out. The Governement did care if the customer didn’t get a competitive service or that NBNco loses a high value site because of the customer density, they just wanted to look good as the roll-out was happening.

    I’m probably going into conspiracy theory mode here, but I think it is less a case of the government having their arm twisted by Opticomm and more like some of the members of parliament having interests in companies that benefit in such dealings.

  13. I think the French equivalent, the Ecolo, in the end chose not to run their own candidate but instead endorsed the PS candidate Hamon. Didn’t help that many of the PS chose to instead endorse Macron, which is an understandable position considering where Hollande was standing in the polls.

  14. The French polls are showing a nearly 2:1 support for Macron over Le Pen, but the worry here is in that the non-Macron/Le Pen voters might just stay home, while those motivated enough to vote Le Pen will come out in force.

  15. peebee @ #1114 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 5:12 pm

    Bemused, I saw the builder on Friday. He seemed pretty open to the suggestion of making good on my cornice. A tradie that I chat to from time to time who works on the site told me they are very good and will sort it out. So fingers crossed!
    The point is, as BW has identified, insurance companies are sweet as pie when accepting your premium, f#ck all attention when making a claim. Pricks.
    Just for those who have just tuned in the insurance company in question is RACV.
    (I am clocking the bad-mouthing so I can report it on my assessment when they want to know about my experience with dealing with them!!!)

    Yes, but the problem is they are all much the same.

  16. Raaraa
    Indeed. Especially when dangerous fools like Melanchon refuse to urge their supporters to get off their arses and vote for Macron rather than the anti-semitic Le Pen folk.

  17. CTar1

    I remembered Hollande implemented some more right-wing measures to appease the UMP voters, which made me go “huh?” so I don’t think he was anything like Corbyn. But that being said, like in the US, the French parliamentary system works like the US Congress. The president might have to agree to some of the measures that they don’t traditionally agree on, if the Parliament has a majority in the party that the president is not part of.

  18. kayjay @ #1088 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 4:46 pm

    Player One
    I refer to the various problems with emoji and Windows 7 with Chrome.
    I updated my Windows 7 Ultimate Service Pack 1 machine and installed the latest Chrome 58.
    Many of the problems with posting emoji are related to Musrums CCCP.

    Thanks for investigating, KayJay. I tried disabling CCCP and I still can’t see any emoticons. However, I will do some more experimenting when I have time – perhaps I actually have to uninstall it. But Crikey is pretty unusable without Musrum’s various scripts, so if I have to choose between emoticons or CCCP , I’d have to choose CCCP.

  19. Boer…the chauvinists fall into two groups, one of the left and the other of the right. They despise each other almost as much as they despise the Republican, pluralist, modernist and democratic majority.

    The effect of this alignment has been to shrink both the conventional left and right and consolidate support in the centre – to suspend the historic, class-mediated divide.

    It remains to be seen how long this alignment will last. But considering the appalling damage done to France by chauvinist forces in the past and the menace they now pose to public order and prosperity, there must be almost no chance of success for FrontNational this time.

  20. I would have expected Abbott to merge his criticism of Abdel-Magied and purported defence of free speech into the one incoherent statement

  21. Corbyn and Hollande have almost nothing in common. At least Hollande, to his credit and despite his poor polling, has a defined view on the future of his country. Corbyn has no such distinction. He is an abstainer on the matter of the future. Who can possibly support him?

  22. Superb comment article in the SMH on religion in schools.

    Churches should play fair in teaching scripture

    It makes sense to have religious education in schools. In an era of filter bubbles and stratified communities, comparative religion taught by class teachers would be a very valuable tool for familiarising school kids with the faith systems of the major global religions, demystifying difference, and promoting respect for others’ beliefs. Class time could reasonably reflect the foundational significance of the Christian faith in Australia.

    Instead, we get Special Religious Education – where students are corralled in faith groups and taught scripture from material that is not even assessed by the department; where teachers are volunteers from church groups, who may have no teaching qualifications at all.

    Or, if their parents have figured out the convoluted system, students can opt out and sit in the library doing “meaningful activities”, an Orwellian departmental coinage that means not doing any schoolwork in case the scripture kids are put at a disadvantage.

    There are complaints on record of SRE teachers telling kids they or their family would go to hell, disapproving of homosexuality and abortion, saying cancer is a consequence of sin or that people should die for their faith.

    These may not be widespread practices. But without this month’s long-buried review of SRE and SEE in NSW government schools, we wouldn’t know.

    The department has no oversight of what is taught in SRE. It is taught by providers, faith groups which self certify that what they are teaching kids is age appropriate, among other things. The department does not check. (The government has now accepted that providers should publish curricula online.)

    But the weird stuff around the fringes is not the most important point.

    If SRE is really about giving students the opportunity to learn about the faith of their parents, which is fair enough, why can’t they do it at their church, synagogue, mosque or temple, on their own time, instead of taking up school time?

    Because the faith groups see their privileged access to impressionable young minds through SRE as incredibly valuable recruitment avenues, that’s why. And they are about as likely to let go of it as a pitbull of a bone.

    Fair enough, you might say – the faith groups want to spread their version of the word. But that’s indoctrination, not education, and it does not belong in secular public schools.

    http://www.smh.com.au/comment/churches-should-play-fair-in-teaching-scripture-20170425-gvrzq7.html

  23. Faced with a Tory alternative and First Past the Post voting, I would vote for Corbyn-lead UK Labour (or even Obeid-led Labor) unless the UK Liberals or Scottish Nationalists were stronger than Labor in my seat.

  24. ‘Steve777
    Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 5:50 pm

    Faced with a Tory alternative and First Past the Post voting, I would vote for Corbyn-lead UK Labour (or even Obeid-led Labor) unless the UK Liberals or Scottish Nationalists were stronger than Labor in my seat.’
    So would around a quarter of your compatriots.
    The other 75% are going to give it to May.

  25. bemused @ #1138 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 6:05 pm

    barney in go dau @ #1135 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 5:55 pm

    bemused @ #1133 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 5:48 pm

    Superb comment article in the SMH on religion in schools.

    Agree 100%

    Worth reading the whole article.
    NSW centric as all the states differ a bit, but the underlying points apply.

    I did.
    Applying an opt-in clause as well vetting instructors and outlining the curriculum would make a big improvement.

    Ultimately having a comparative course taught by teachers would be a much better option for both the students and the society.

  26. A tour boat came across the turtle, estimated to be about 100 years old, near the Urangan Harbour and recognised it was injured and distressed.

    After slowing the boat down, operator Peter Lynch said the animal swam towards the vessel “looking for help”.

    Videos show the turtle swimming by the back of the boat, allowing those on board to pick it up.

    Mr Lynch said it had obviously been hit by another boat, with deep cuts to its head and shell.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-26/injured-green-sea-turtle-dies-following-boat-strike/8473896

  27. victoria @ #940 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 11:39 am

    C@t
    Scrolling on by is a great strategy.

    I agree. I can’t understand why people allow themselves to get so worked up by other posters on internet blogs. If you don’t like someone then just ignore them. You can even use STFU if scrolling past is too hard for you. You’ll be much happier for it.

  28. Barney in Go Dau @ #1140 Wednesday, April 26th, 2017 – 6:13 pm

    Applying an opt-in clause as well vetting instructors and outlining the curriculum would make a big improvement.

    Ultimately having a comparative course taught by teachers would be a much better option for both the students and the society.

    Yes. Big difference between a course like ‘religious book X says A happened, and religious book Y says B happened, and physical evidence and known science shows little to nothing in support of either A or B’ and one merely like ‘A happened’.

    It sounds like in many cases what students are actually getting is the latter case, which is wrong on many levels.

  29. a r @ #1143 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 6:23 pm

    Barney in Go Dau @ #1140 Wednesday, April 26th, 2017 – 6:13 pm

    Applying an opt-in clause as well vetting instructors and outlining the curriculum would make a big improvement.
    Ultimately having a comparative course taught by teachers would be a much better option for both the students and the society.

    Yes. Big difference between a course like ‘religious book X says A happened, and religious book Y says B happened, and physical evidence and known science shows little to nothing in support of either A or B’ and one merely like ‘A happened’.
    It sounds like in many cases what students are actually getting is the latter case, which is wrong on many levels.

    I wouldn’t go that far.

    I’m an atheist but religions exist and we live in a society where multiple religions exist.

    For me comparative religious education is about gaining an appreciation of many religions so you have a better understanding of others as opposed to the ignorance we see in our society today.

  30. On Saturday morning I noticed my WiFi constantly dropping out. It Required having to go to ‘trouble shoot’ to gain a connection to the modem every time a page required updating. After a long try Google produced a solution, I eventually found the problem was an overnight Win 10 ‘upgrade’ which stuffed the TCP and it required a CMD reinstall TCP/IP (must be done as administrator) Once done back to normal.
    Internode was no use, their solution was to buy a new modem!

  31. simon aussie katich @ #993 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 1:18 pm

    lizzie, if it is coming from the blue ribbon vic lib set, then I assume they are concerned she is holding it without the use of the expected baby carrier – ie, a nanny.
    When they find out she her own breasts to feed the thing they will go apoplectic. Oh, the shame of it all!

    Wasn’t there a blow up a while ago about a MP breastfeeding in Parliament?

  32. Ch9 SYD news just had a report on railway infrastructure and the reporter said it’s looking likely that Bill Shorten will be the next PM! I hope such statements don’t get him in trouble : )

    They also had a bit where some state MP slagged off Shorten and then let Shorten reply. WTTE “I don’t give much thought to Lib’s saying nasty things about me”.

    Can anyone give me a report on how Mark Riley on Ch7 is going these days? I just got so tired of his Turnbull love a few month back I stopped watching.

  33. bemused @ #1146 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 6:34 pm

    barney in go dau @ #1140 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 6:13 pm

    bemused @ #1138 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 6:05 pm
    Ultimately having a comparative course taught by teachers would be a much better option for both the students and the society.

    Yes indeed.
    An intelligent student would quickly work out that they could not all be right and maybe none of them were!
    Little wonder they don’t want it.

    The other important point made in the article is that our schools should be about education, not indoctrination.

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