Newspoll: 52-48 to Labor

The latest result from Newspoll lands slightly at the upper end of the government’s recent form.

Courtesy of The Australian, the latest result from Newspoll records Labor with a two-party lead of 52-48, down from 53-47 in the last poll (which was three weeks ago rather than the usual two, owing to Easter). Labor and the Greens are both down a point on the primary vote, to 35% and 9%, with the Coalition and One Nation steady on 36% and 10%. Malcolm Turnbull is up two on approval to 32% and down two on disapproval to 57%, while Bill Shorten is up one to 33% and down one to 53%. Turnbull’s lead as preferred prime minister shifts from 41-32 to 42-33.

Author: William Bowe

William Bowe is a Perth-based election analyst and occasional teacher of political science. His blog, The Poll Bludger, has existed in one form or another since 2004, and is one of the most heavily trafficked websites on Australian politics.

1,209 comments on “Newspoll: 52-48 to Labor”

  1. That Anzac tweet takes up about 7/8 of the acreage of the front page of today’s Telecrap. No doubt it’s attack dog columnist are frothing at the mouth. Murdoch attacking a rival, it’s so transparent.

  2. “That Anzac tweet takes up about 7/8 of the acreage of the front page of today’s Telecrap. No doubt it’s attack dog columnist are frothing at the mouth. Murdoch attacking a rival, it’s so transparent.”

    Anything to deflect attention from the shenanagins coming from the LNP.

  3. **Commemoration of loss…How can it be restored…**
    Commemoration is a complicated term and requires subtlety in meaning and act. We dont do ‘subtle’ anymore. Heck, we dont do ‘complicated’ either.

    I thought the recent film Frantz did a good job of it.

  4. Bemused
    “And that has completely turned me off the whole thing.”

    Me as well. Bit sick of being told what I’m supposed to say and think on Anzac Day, and being obliged to regurgitate the same patriotic myths I learned in primary school.
    My family was decimated by WWI. To me Anzac Day is about the stupidity and futility of war, especially the industrialised carnage of WWI.
    More power to Yassmin for going against the grain.

  5. Re celebrity deaths, Tim Pigott-Smith, who played Creedy* in “V”, died suddenly earlier this month.

    * not ‘McReedy’ as per my prior post

  6. ‘Commemoration is a complicated term and requires subtlety in meaning and act. We dont do ‘subtle’ anymore. Heck, we dont do ‘complicated’ either.’

    Too true. Nuance has flown out the window also, seemingly never to return.

  7. This article in The Age caught my attention and proved to be more interesting that I expected.

    Here’s what Australia’s cellular network scene could look like by 2020

    TPG Telecom Ltd has announced it intends to become Australia’s fourth mobile network operator, along with Telstra, Optus and Vodafone.

    TPG Telecom Ltd has purchased spectrum licenses for $1.26 billion and will spend another $600 million building the network infrastructure. However, it has emphasised it will not be competing across the whole Australian market, just 80 per cent of the population.

    TPG Telecom Ltd has announced it intends to become Australia’s fourth mobile network operator, along with Telstra, Optus and Vodafone.

    TPG Telecom Ltd has purchased spectrum licenses for $1.26 billion and will spend another $600 million building the network infrastructure. However, it has emphasised it will not be competing across the whole Australian market, just 80 per cent of the population.

    So what will the mobile network environment look like in a few years time? It is reasonable to make some informed forecasts.

    If the market can indeed support a fourth network, the network scene is likely to be dominated by four carriers whose main offering is 4G mobile communications standard. However, significant inroads by Wi-Fi based services can be expected. Also, “Internet of Things” devices may constitute a revenue stream to the four main operators, but that may well be undermined by emerging linked technologies.

    City dwellers are spoilt for choice when it comes to which mobile operator they do business with, and consequently there is a great deal of competition for subscriber business.

    For consumers outside major population areas, perhaps not so much. This does lead to the question as to whether consumers could be served better if mobile infrastructure were treated as a natural monopoly with infrastructure built once, and licenses issued to operators to use it.

    It seems wasteful that in the suburbs of the capital cities there are typically three, soon to be four, mobile base stations within a few hundred metres of each other. In rural and remote areas there is typically one or no service.

    An interesting development in this area is that competition regulator the ACCC has recently proposed that Telstra might be obliged to share its infrastructure in rural areas with other carriers. We may be seeing a de-facto move towards a utility model of mobile infrastructure. Perhaps consumers overall would be better served if mobile infrastructure were provided by a single, regulated entity.

    As ever in telecommunications, we live in interesting times.

    I have posted several times before my belief that the NBN should incorporate mobile telephony so that we avoid the folly of duplicated, triplicate or worse infrastructure in some locations and blackspots or inadequate service in others. I am please to see I am not alone in this belief.

  8. **Channel Nine urged by financial analysts UBS to drop loss-making cricket broadcast coverage – ABCNews**
    This is a bad thing?

  9. kakuru @ #1004 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 1:35 pm

    Bemused
    “And that has completely turned me off the whole thing.”
    Me as well. Bit sick of being told what I’m supposed to say and think on Anzac Day, and being obliged to regurgitate the same patriotic myths I learned in primary school.
    My family was decimated by WWI. To me Anzac Day is about the stupidity and futility of war, especially the industrialised carnage of WWI.
    More power to Yassmin for going against the grain.

    I hate the way many things have been captured by bogans with Australian flags as items of apparel.
    I used to accompany my father and am familiar with the demeanour of him and his surviving comrades at ANZAC day and other events. Far removed from some of what takes place now.

  10. About 1/8 of the Telecrap front page (along the left) is taken up with an attack on renewables, blaming the for electricity price increases. The bottom left corner has something about NRL. The bottom centre and right has a report (which seems to be fair) on Bill Shorten spending $400* million on a rail link to Badgery’s Creek Airport, billed as an ‘exclusive’.

    * that’s very generous of Bill. I didn’t know he was that rich

  11. lizzie @ #999 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 1:25 pm

    John Wren‏ @JohnWren1950 · 6m6 minutes ago
    and by the way RWNJs, the photo of @yassmin_a in @dailytelegraph with 2 finger salute was taken in 2015. Nothing to do with #ANZAC. #auspol

    This kind of stuff infuriates me. They have every right to criticise someone for their position, but why add unrelated material to further misrepresent someone?

    It’s like that doctor who got removed from the UA flight and then adding his past convictions into it which has nothing to do with his removal.

  12. raaraa @ #1015 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 1:53 pm

    lizzie @ #999 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 1:25 pm

    John Wren‏ @JohnWren1950 · 6m6 minutes ago
    and by the way RWNJs, the photo of @yassmin_a in @dailytelegraph with 2 finger salute was taken in 2015. Nothing to do with #ANZAC. #auspol

    This kind of stuff infuriates me. They have every right to criticise someone for their position, but why add unrelated material to further misrepresent someone?
    It’s like that doctor who got removed from the UA flight and then adding his past convictions into it which has nothing to do with his removal.

    That sort of blatant and intentional mis-representation should be actionable.

  13. kakuru @ #1004 Wednesday, April 26th, 2017 – 1:35 pm

    More power to Yassmin for going against the grain.

    Indeed. Still don’t understand the faux-outrage.

    How is reminding people about the plight of modern-day refugees in any way disrespectful or inappropriate towards veterans? The two things aren’t mutually exclusive; it’s entirely valid (and appropriate) to give thought to both.

  14. I meant to post this yesterday as I thought it included so many interesting elements.

    From Shanghai to Sydney to Baghdad: Captain Feng’s own Anzac journey

    Yikang Feng was raised in Shanghai. His grandmother was on Mao Zedong’s Long March, the famous military retreat by the communists that saved them from the ruling nationalists’ army.

    He’s now Captain Feng, on his second rotation with the Australian Defence Force to Iraq, training local forces in the fight against the so-called Islamic State.

    On the 101st Anzac Day, the capability of a modern army like Australia’s that battles shadowy insurgencies among civilian populations, or trains local forces who have their own intricate cultures, rests as much on understanding the world’s array of peoples as it does on traditional war fighting skills.

    Captain Feng is a case in point. He didn’t know what Anzac Day was until he joined the Australian Army. He came to Australia at 18 to study, then became a Sydney finance trader with Macquarie Group and CommSec. He paints and plays cello.

    He now serves with the 5th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment based in Darwin, where he has a fiancee.

    As second-in-command of a training company, he liaises with the Iraqis and oversees the trainers. Over two deployments, he’s watched the Iraqis grow from shaky and uncertain fighters as they faced retaking the city of Ramadi, a key test when they were still on the back foot, to a confident force that knows it will conquer the great bastion of Mosul.

    His background has helped him navigate the local culture, which has some of the social complexities of China such as saving face and the need sometimes to skirt issues gently rather than approach them head-on.

    “My personal experience was I had to shift from Chinese culture into Australian culture and get myself integrated. I’m doing the reverse

    in Iraq

    . Arab culture has intricate social layers and structures.

    “I’m not saying my trainers can’t pick up the difference. I’m slightly more sensitive.”

    Just as important is understanding that some things are universal. He sees Anzac Day, for instance, as a story of sacrifice.

    “I grew up with stories of the Red Army. My Grandma walked in the Long March, so I think you connect at a human level and realise the magnitude of the sacrifice … That’s not a very difficult concept to comprehend.”
    http://www.smh.com.au/federal-politics/political-news/from-shanghai-to-sydney-to-baghdad-captain-fengs-own-anzac-journey-20170424-gvrkut.html

    Worth reading the whole article.

  15. bemused

    I find the discussion on the viability of a fourth mobile network to be interesting. Not quite a coincidence but TPG also won the right to run the fourth network in Singapore, a smaller market but one which on first look, seems saturated. I can’t remember by what factor mobile phones outnumber people in Singapore, but I think people are keen with the competition.

  16. **There is an opportunity for a cartoonist to depict Credlin’s rich backers in an oldie perambulator**
    Or suckling… on Tori Amos.

  17. Perhaps the O’Dwyer baby comment was some sort of moan that she or her supporters are ‘hiding’ behind the recent birth of her baby to discredit those making a move on her seat.

    It all seems very ugly.

    I’d be willing to give credence to the idea this campaign against O’Dwyer is just a feint from the Abbott/RWNJ faction to say “lay off moving against the conservative faction or we’ll go for preselection MAD”, except for the fact that the nutty “don’t touch our super millions” rich white guys have been making such a big deal about being in the vanguard.

    Meh. Who knows. Entertaining to watch from the outside. Hard to imagine that if this were Labor, particularly in government, there wouldn’t be wall-to-wall headlines of “Chaos!” “Disunity!” “Factional brawling!” “Faceless men!”.

  18. raaraa @ #1023 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 2:05 pm

    bemused
    I find the discussion on the viability of a fourth mobile network to be interesting. Not quite a coincidence but TPG also won the right to run the fourth network in Singapore, a smaller market but one which on first look, seems saturated. I can’t remember by what factor mobile phones outnumber people in Singapore, but I think people are keen with the competition.

    It seems to me that TPG have a business model to ‘cherry pick’ by only targeting the most profitable areas of a market and to hell with the rest. They tried the same thing with a fibre network to compete with NBN in selected highly profitable areas.
    Good for them, but to the overall detriment of a good service.

  19. guytaur @ #967 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 12:25 pm

    abcnews: .@yassmin_a: #ABC can’t sweep presenter’s #AnzacDay controversy under the carpet, @Barnaby_Joyce says ab.co/2ou8zZa pic.twitter.com/FmWfRctlF6
    https://twitter.com/abcnews/status/857057828640608257
    Bullying so natural for the LNP

    I found this tweet interesting for the lack of response.

    Queen Zhalli …‏ @zhalli1 53m53 minutes ago
    More
    Replying to @abcnews @yassmin_a @Barnaby_Joyce
    You know I find it disgusting & sad That Yassmins comment didn’t open up a discussion of the abuses in Manus & Nauru

    The obvious answer is that the outrage is to distract from any discussion of the point being made.

  20. Raaraa, the said doctor had no previous convictions, they belonged to another doctor with the same surname. Not sure if that makes it better or worse.

  21. bemused @ #1026 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 2:08 pm

    raaraa @ #1023 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 2:05 pm

    bemused
    I find the discussion on the viability of a fourth mobile network to be interesting. Not quite a coincidence but TPG also won the right to run the fourth network in Singapore, a smaller market but one which on first look, seems saturated. I can’t remember by what factor mobile phones outnumber people in Singapore, but I think people are keen with the competition.

    It seems to me that TPG have a business model to ‘cherry pick’ by only targeting the most profitable areas of a market and to hell with the rest. They tried the same thing with a fibre network to compete with NBN in selected highly profitable areas.
    Good for them, but to the overall detriment of a good service.

    Definitely a case in a point for a good well-run network overseen by the government like the NBN (though unlike how it is allowed to run now), if left to private enterprises, some people will never be connected.

  22. raaraa @ #1030 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 2:43 pm

    bemused @ #1026 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 2:08 pm

    raaraa @ #1023 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 2:05 pm

    bemused
    I find the discussion on the viability of a fourth mobile network to be interesting. Not quite a coincidence but TPG also won the right to run the fourth network in Singapore, a smaller market but one which on first look, seems saturated. I can’t remember by what factor mobile phones outnumber people in Singapore, but I think people are keen with the competition.

    It seems to me that TPG have a business model to ‘cherry pick’ by only targeting the most profitable areas of a market and to hell with the rest. They tried the same thing with a fibre network to compete with NBN in selected highly profitable areas.
    Good for them, but to the overall detriment of a good service.

    Definitely a case in a point for a good well-run network overseen by the government like the NBN (though unlike how it is allowed to run now), if left to private enterprises, some people will never be connected.

    Indeed!
    We have (had?) a Universal Service Obligation for telephones so that everyone had access to a telephone service on equal terms as far as possible. We need the same for NBN and Mobile Telephones.
    In a country like Australia with big distances, coverage is a big issue.

  23. Bemused

    I hate the way many things have been captured by bogans with Australian flags as items of apparel.
    I used to accompany my father and am familiar with the demeanour of him and his surviving comrades at ANZAC day and other events.</blockquote
    Your comment about "bogans with Australian flags" is spot on.
    My father was a medical orderly on the Kokoda Track and had to cope with some pretty horrific stuff which he did not talk about until late in life. He had no time for the RSL bullshit, and would have been totally appalled by the plight of refugees on Manus.

  24. Bemused
    (blockquotes this time)

    I hate the way many things have been captured by bogans with Australian flags as items of apparel.
    I used to accompany my father and am familiar with the demeanour of him and his surviving comrades at ANZAC day and other events.

    Your comment about “bogans with Australian flags” is spot on.
    My father was a medical orderly on the Kokoda Track and had to cope with some pretty horrific stuff which he did not talk about until late in life. He had no time for the RSL bullshit, and would have been totally appalled by the plight of refugees on Manus.

  25. Divided Nation know how to pick them.

    Another lowlife bites the dust.

    Oh come on, the guy had a reffo sounding name. Had it coming.

    Silly ex-copper shoulda joined the Libs. With his talents he could be Immigration Minister in a few years.

  26. For us on Fixed Wireless NBN : needed now

    NBN Co achieves superfast broadband speeds with fixed wireless in a demonstration of capacity not yet available

    NBN Co has trialled a superfast broadband in Ballarat, that delivered speeds 20 times faster than normal fixed wireless — but it won’t be available anytime soon.

    Achieving 1.1 gigabits per second, that would allow you to download a high quality Blu-Ray movie in just five seconds.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2017-04-26/nbn-achieves-superfast-broadband-speeds-with-fixed-wireless/8473024

  27. Ratsak **With his talents he could be Immigration Minister in a few years**
    Oh come on. Did you read this…
    **when told Guardian Australia had confirmed the threats came from his bona fide personal Facebook account, Ellis said he did not “remember doing that message” and that “it might be [me], it might not be, I don’t know which”**
    He is clearly already Minister for Industry and Science level material – if not Attorney General.

  28. PhoenixRED
    Thid bit of the article sounds dodgy:

    The 1,100 megabit per second, compares with the often-criticised speeds of 25 megabits per second download or slower if many users are active, available on the Fibre to the Premises (FTTP) or to the Node (FTTN).

  29. trog sorrenson @ #1035 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 2:59 pm

    Bemused

    I hate the way many things have been captured by bogans with Australian flags as items of apparel.
    I used to accompany my father and am familiar with the demeanour of him and his surviving comrades at ANZAC day and other events.</blockquote
    Your comment about “bogans with Australian flags” is spot on.
    My father was a medical orderly on the Kokoda Track and had to cope with some pretty horrific stuff which he did not talk about until late in life. He had no time for the RSL bullshit, and would have been totally appalled by the plight of refugees on Manus.

    Apart from anything else, I am greatly amused that those bogans professing love/respect for the flag violate so many of the protocols for using/handling the flag.
    Idiots!

  30. From the link by Bemused:

    His background has helped him navigate the local culture, which has some of the social complexities of China such as saving face and the need sometimes to skirt issues gently rather than approach them head-on.

    I have worried about this for some time. Aussies often take pride in being ‘frank and outspoken, but… What if Barnaby was given more authority? Or Derryn Hinch? Or any of the RWNJs currently posting their aggressive rubbish on Twitter?

  31. Bring back Paul Keating. Now.
    Watched him today at the Lowy Institute at a book launch for Alan Gyngel. His language, his knowledge , his imgination and his grasp of the big global picture is unmatched in this country.
    He could run the show for four or five days a week. Take weekends off. Forget the cableTV drones. Ignore the Gallery.
    I reckon he’d fix the joint in two years.

  32. bemused: re your #935
    What was exposed last night was your narcissistic personality disorder, and your incapability of understanding when you had been gratuitously and deliberately offensive to another contributor to this blog. Your absolute certainty of the correctness of a seriously stupid assertion of yours, when you were patently just plain WRONG, was also amusing to those of us with functioning, socially adept personalities.

    You have an absolutely staggering lack of self awareness. You are plainly too far gone, and too thick, to do anything about your disorder, so the rest of us will just observe, and make up our own minds on whether to ignore you, or laugh at you. I choose the latter.

  33. ctar1 @ #1042 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 3:21 pm

    PhoenixRED
    Thid bit of the article sounds dodgy:

    The 1,100 megabit per second, compares with the often-criticised speeds of 25 megabits per second download or slower if many users are active, available on the Fibre to the Premises (FTTP) or to the Node (FTTN).

    It is entirely artificial as it only involves one user.
    As regards those FTTP figures, that is because retailers are not buying enough capacity from NBN to allow the claimed speeds to be met except when only a few users are active. They do this because of high NBN wholesale prices.
    It is a goddam mess.

  34. CTar1 Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at 3:21 pm

    PhoenixRED
    Thid bit of the article sounds dodgy:

    “The 1,100 megabit per second, compares with the often-criticised speeds of 25 megabits per second download or slower if many users are active, available on the Fibre to the Premises (FTTP) or to the Node (FTTN).”

    *********************************************

    It’s Malcolm …… it’s FRAUD – Band ….. of course it is dodgy ….. its par for the course of all his endeavours …..

    Like his new mate, Donald – If you can’t dazzle them with brilliance, baffle them with bullshit ….

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